Finding the perfect RV campground is like searching for a unicorn—you’re pretty sure it doesn’t exist, but you’ve still got hope that it does. And while perfection is subjective, most RV campers agree that certain elements can set a campground apart from its competitors.

We asked members of The Dyrt’s Facebook Campfire group about what they look for in an RV campground, from the must-have basics to the little details that make it spectacular.



Here’s What The Ultimate RV Campground Looks Like

The perfect RV campground is made up of a combination of three things: the site, the amenities, and the location. Of course, every campground offers these in some way; it’s the thoughtful extras that transform an RV campground from ‘just okay’ to the kind of place you don’t want to leave.

If you’re new to RV camping, these are the things you should look for when searching for campgrounds to park your rig.

Spacious, Private Campsites

a long circular gravel campsite with an RV and campers setting up

Image of Cannonville/Bryce Valley KOA in Utah by The Dyrt camper Charli S.

The perfect RV campsite is spacious, private, shaded, and level, with full hook-ups and ADA-accessible sites available.

A spacious site is large enough for the RV itself and any awnings or side pop-outs, so campers can use their rig to its full advantage. With RVs ranging in size from compact teardrop campers to 45-foot Class A vehicles, this can be tough to accommodate. The solution is sometimes a variety of site sizes, and campground staff who have a magical ability to match the site to the camper.

“My biggest complaint is when the campground employees try to put me in a site that will not allow for the swing of my truck and travel trailer when backing in.” — The Dyrt camper Rob Carter.

Size isn’t the only thing that matters. Campers across the board told us that privacy is a key feature of the ultimate RV campground. That means ample space between sites, so you’re not staring out of your window straight into your neighbor’s bedroom.

Trees, bushes, and other vegetation are useful in creating a privacy barrier; they can also serve multiple purposes, providing shade and somewhere to hang a clothesline.

The ideal RV campsite is level, preferably on a concrete pad or otherwise paved (though some campers prefer less pavement). With a level site, campers can park their RV anywhere without making further adjustments or worrying about rogue tree roots. And speaking of parking, the perfect RV campsite makes it easy to pull in and pull out, whether you’re towing or not.

“Flat level spaces (a cement pad would be great), a great view (lakes, mountains, etc.), full hookups, laundry room, good wifi, affordable, dog friendly, privacy (maybe with trees, or bushes), clean restrooms and shower, friendly staff, easy to pull in back up and/or park the camper, maybe a small grocery store, nice fire pits.” — The Dyrt camper Mike Danich

When we talk about perfect RV campgrounds, we can’t skip over the luxury of full hook-ups. While many RV campers are capable of boondocking off-grid, having water, power, and sewer provides an extra level of comfort. For the total package, some RV campgrounds even include cable hook-ups.

Awesome RV Campground Amenities

a fenced dog park at a campground in texas with RVs in the distance

Image of Hidden Valley RV Park in Texas from The Dyrt camper Teri B.

RV campers appreciate good amenities, and quality matters more than quantity. Clean bathrooms leave a lasting impression, with bonus points for nice shower facilities. And speaking of bathrooms, great RV campgrounds have multiple dump sites, so no one has to wait in line to empty out their gray or black tank.

“Flat spacious sites on the water with a great view. Clean bathrooms, a good spot for water and also for dumping with multiple spots so more than one camper can fill up or empty out at one time.” — The Dyrt camper Brian Evan Truran

These days, camping isn’t always synonymous with being disconnected, especially with so many RV campers working remotely on the road. That’s why WiFi has become a sought-after amenity for many campers, who have to balance work with play at an RV campground.

Campers also look for firepits, firewood for sale, an on-site grocery shop, dog-friendly areas, a fish-cleaning station, campground swimming pools, laundry rooms, hot tubs, playgrounds, and activities. Examples of activities include live music, bingo, pancake breakfasts—anything that creates a friendly, social atmosphere where you can meet like-minded campers.

“Activities would be great. We stayed at an RV Park in Colorado. One night they had an ice cream social and on Sunday mornings, they had a waffle breakfast. Just waffles but different syrups, fresh fruit toppings, and whipping cream. We loved this because it gave us a chance to meet the other campers. They also had a huge dog run which was awesome.” — The Dyrt camper Rhonda Brenner

Unbeatable Location and Price

an RV camper set up at a campground looking at far away mountains in montana

Image of Countryside RV Park in Montana from The Dyrt camper Ernie H.

Finally, the perfect RV campground has a prime location, preferably near water. This could mean a swimming pool or easy proximity to a local lake, river, or ocean. Campers love nature views—it’s hard to beat a water view from the front door.

A good location has easy access to hiking and biking trails, as well as to any nearby attractions. Public transportation links are helpful, too, but (we’re talking perfection here) the campground shouldn’t be too close to noisy, busy roads. Ideal campgrounds are a peaceful oasis, somewhere campers can retreat to after a day of exploring.

For some campers, the perfect RV campground has a microbrewery, cafe, or restaurant on site; for others, it’s enough to have one within a few miles.

“Dog-friendly, a view, and privacy. A great brewery in the vicinity doesn’t hurt :)” — The Dyrt camper Georgina Cole

And the perfect RV campground comes with a fair price. Everyone’s budget and camping style is different, so defining ‘fair’ can be hard. As a starting point, compare prices against other campgrounds in the area with similar amenities to give you an idea of the going rate. Running costs, number of sites, amenities, and location can all affect the cost of a night’s accommodation.

“We like privacy and space, plus affordability. Even at $30 a night you’re spending $1000 a month.” — The Dyrt camper Jerry Fisher




Lauren Fitzpatrick

Lauren Fitzpatrick

Lauren has been a carny, fruit picker, teacher, and movie extra, but what she likes the most is seeing the world and writing about it. She recently spent 18 months traveling Australia in a camper trailer and is still disappointed that she didn't spot a single wombat. Read her writing at Lateral Movements