the dyrt
THE BEST CAMPING IN
Arizona
1123 Reviews 907 Campgrounds

Arizona boasts itself as the gateway to the Grand Canyon. And, it’s true: There’s no better place to set off into the red- and orange-painted cliffs, winding canyons, and rippling rivers of this wild and grand desert landscape. But, camping in Arizona doesn’t stop at The Big Ditch. From Flagstaff to Sedona, and beyond, you’ll find some of the best desert camping in the U.S. right in this state.

The Colorado River carved through 277 miles of ancient sandstone and limestone to form the Grand Canyon. Stop along the edges of this natural wonder for some of the most famous and scenic camping in Arizona. Go straight to Grand Canyon Village and camp at the Mather campground on the South Rim to experience the best pit stops and catch jaw-dropping canyon views on the Bright Angel Trail. Or, opt for areas less saturated with people and head to Desert View Campground on the South Rim. Hike to Coconino Overlook to sample views of the massive canyon or put your boots on the Arizona Trail, one of the country’s National Scenic Trails.

For those interested in venturing into other parts of Arizona, head to Sedona for more red rock desert camping. There’s a variety of things to do in Sedona, and camping, of course, is one of the best. From red rock canyons to rock formations fabled as energy vortexes, you’ll find views and adventures in Sedona unlike any other. Camp at Pine Flat Campground, where tall ponderosas brush up against red rock walls. Get up to hike for sunrise or start out at sunset to see the best colors amidst the desert. Or, bring your bike along for the ride to experience world-class mountain biking trails right in Sedona.

Whether it’s hiking, biking, or just sleeping beneath the desert sky when camping in Arizona, the state is truly an outdoor-lover’s desert mecca. So grab your tent and head to the edges of the Grand Canyon or into the quiet nooks of Sedona and discover a land of red-rock beauty.

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Recent Reviews in Arizona
I love this place

Awesome scenery. But the camp ground can get very busy. The site are ok in size but some sites are very close together. There are showers and flush toilets if you are into that. To get to the lake from the tent sites you have to climb down a pretty steep rocky hill or drive to the day use area. We fish for catfish and have caught a few here but also got skunked a few times. I've stayed here June July and October. Dont really recommend fall really windy cold and rainy. But not not many campers that time of the year.

Love it here!

So friendly! Nice dog park, good wifi, activities like potlucks and poker. Would definitely come back.

Age qualified RV resort

This campground was not too far from main towns or stores (like Walmart) but the general area has very poor cellular reception (at least in regards to T-mobile). The resort offers WiFi, but it is only in the library area.

This resort had many people permanently living there, so there was a well established and very organized daily event ritual. There were always some kind of game or potluck happening.

The resort has a heated pool and a hot tub. There were many game rooms that contained dart boards, pool tables, and card tables. There was a shuffleboard area, a library and a laundry room. As most resorts go, it also had group shower rooms available.

The water pressure here was poor. Since I have an on demand water heater, I spent my time here on dry camp mode.

In the middle of nowhere

This is a campground built like a parking lot. All gravel. There are a couple places in area to eat, and a couple of very overly priced grocery stores. Please do all your shopping before you get there, otherwise go to the dollar store that's in the area for the best deals. The gas in this area is reasonably priced though. This campground is more for the ATV/dirt bike owners. Mostly everybody there hailed some kind of gas powered toy with them. This place appeared to have many trails going for miles in every direction. We walked a few miles on one of them, but it's relatively flat land, and not much to see but sand and cactus.

This campground had a very warm pool (90 degrees) and hot tub (104 degrees). It was pleasurable swimming at night, especially when the air is cold. It was like being at a hot spring! There were a few events hosted on the grounds, such as a potluck dinner on Mondays, and blueberry pancakes & orange juice on Tuesdays, hot dog & chips on Wednesdays. Saturdays was movie night with popcorn, and every night the guests would play games at 630 in both community areas. This is where we leaned to play "fast track". There was a small putting green, pool table, a ping pong table, a small library, a crafts area, a laundry room, a small store, shower areas, and a cardio exercise machine. Fire rings are available to rent from the camp store for $5 a day.

The cellular service for T-mobile was excellent there, but the water pressure was relatively jumpy from okay to low.. So if you have an on demand water heater like I do, you might want to switch to dry camp mode for stability.

Age qualified resort with lots of extras

My husband and I asked if we could stay there even though we aren't 55, and they allowed us to do so. We've found most age qualified resorts will let you stay if you don't have kids or pets.

This is a busy little 55+ RV community. There are many who live there full time, but many who come and go like we do. There's lots of activities like shuffleboard, pickleball, billiards, card tables, bocce ball, karaoke, bingo, concerts, seminars and exercise classes like Zumba or Tai chi. There are many clubs to join that do singles events, food events, arts & crafts events, prayer groups, music groups, volunteer work, bus trips, card tournaments, dancing, pool activities such as exercise classes and water volleyball. There are also lots of off-site events such as hiking, golfing, bowling and casino nights.

The resort itself has a sewing room, craft room, ballroom, fitness center (with an assortment of cardio and weightlifting machines), library, computer room, two laundry rooms, two pools (87 degrees) and one hot tub. There's a mail room, billiards room, card room and shower rooms. There's a dog run, golf green, horseshoe, darts, pickleball, shuffleboard, bocce ball courts/areas. One pool allows for only 18 and up, while the other pool allows 18 and under. There are grills and picnic ramadas scattered about for everyone's use.

Cell coverage for T-mobile is great here, there are lots of big name stores (like Walmart) all within walking distance from this resort. And in the case you have an on demand water heater like I do, the water pressure here is great!

Ugh

No real access to water from campgrounds. Unkempt and not the outdoorsy camping we were looking for. Lots of double camps that were decent looking but nothing cool enough for us to stay. Definitely take the time to go to Lower Burnt Corral campground for a scenic drive and better camping.

Great campground

Nice area. Didn't catch any fish and lots of trees and rocks near water by camps. Didn't notice a dock till we were leaving. Enough room between neighbors, clean bathrooms. No phone service but it was nice to be off the grid. We will definitely camp here again!

Primitive campground with vault toilets

Just south of highway 60, West of Superior, AZ (about 4 miles). Paved road to the turnoff for the campsite and then dirt but not too rough. My Prius made it just fine. Though there are definitely some roads farther on that are extremely uneven granite dells.

Two pit toilets are the only amenities, but there is plenty of hiking. You can hear road noise from highway 60. There’s a nearby mine and I occasionally heard muffled explosions but I did not feel them. On two of the days I was there I saw or at least heard low flying fighter jets (but within FAA regs) go by and a couple of multi-rotor helicopters. Had the skies not been overcast I’d have seen all of them. They were very loud but it was maybe five minutes total out of my week-long stay.

There’s no WiFi, even if you have a yaggi antenna. There’s enough cell service for text and phone calls (maybe/iffy) on the Verizon network.

Stayed Feb. 14, 2019 - March 14, 2019

Staff is very friendly, good size sites, beautiful views, and bathrooms are clean. Cable and WI FI available. They had a luncheon for Valentines day and Fat Tuesday, We enjoyed our time and will return again.

A little pricey but well worth it--beautiful, quite place with basics

I generally try to avoid paid campgrounds but there are few options, even in the off-season, in this area, and we were driving late into the day, so it was a relief to get to this campground, and even more pleasant to wake up here the next morning. The area is beautiful, the campground is pleasant and you have all the luxuries a paid campground should offer--water, picnic tables, toilets, fire pits, etc. About 45 minutes from Page, and if you are headed for the North Rim of the Grand Canyon this would be a good stop (though not in the winter, as the North Rim is closed dec to mid-may.

Small & remote camp

Happy Valley campground's name can be decieving.. its actually at 6,000' of elevation, 4.6 miles up the Miller Creek trail in the Rincon mountains east of Tucson. It lies within the Saguaro National Park so a permit is required ($8 fee). Up to 6 people per permit. There is 3 spots at the camp. Each spot has a fire ring, bear box, and some good size stumps to sit on around the fire. There is a vaulted toilet at the site as well. Water can be scarce in the Rincons so plan accordingly!

Another 3.4 miles up the trail and you'll be at the summit of Rincon Peak (8,200'ish).

Perfect Day for Petroglyphs

Well maintained trail system that offers amazing views of the sandstone rock formations and petroglyphs. There is a rock squeeze in the trail too.

Remote campground

I love this campground because it's off a dirt road, quiet, and small. Mostly for tents, small groups, or 4x4's. There is a clean vault tiolet with a garbage receptacle. Rv's could get stuck.

We'll be back, Kofa!!!

Free dispersed camping, about 23 miles south of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and stunning views of surrounding mountains. Camped here for 3 days and loved it! Many RVers were using solar panels instead of generators, adding to the serenity here. In addition to RV access, there are a couple of beautiful tenting areas near the entrance to Palm Canyon. No water or toilets nearby, so plan ahead!

Awesome hiking and mountain biking in the area. Be sure to visit Palm Canyon and Kofa Queen Canyon -- very different from each other, but both are spectacular. Kofa Queen is accessible via OHV and mountain bike as well as on foot. Palm Canyon is a fun, scrambling hike and much more difficult than Kofa Queen, but absolutely worth it.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town (via Hwy 95) for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about everything a camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Wrong spot

Kehl is on top of the rim not below. Great campground.

Great little campground

A lot of traffic on 300 but it never bothered me. Small but very very nice campground. Love the area for Boondocking too.

Terrific Winter Boondocking!

Great location. Only about 6 miles from Quartzsite, AZ where they have most supplies you need. Cell service in area but slow depending on how many campers are sharing the tower with you. We just got back from our 4th January trip there in a row.

www.hitched4fun.com 🤓 Delivering fun while hitched! 🏕

Amazing

Good hike, cheeted and had the mules carry our stuff. Amazing vews.

Free & Just North of Quartzsite

Free dispersed camping, about 4 miles north of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. No trash service, but this area is very close to the Refuse Transfer Station off Hwy 95. Area is quiet with no major road noise.

Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area.

Many RVers use solar panels for all or at least part of their power needs though, so generator use is minimal.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about everything a camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

First to Review
Convenient to town

A big sandy parking lot of RV’s with both full hook-ups electric/water/sewer and dry camping options.

There are a couple of flush toilets (often no toilet paper though), $5 (passable) showers for anyone to use, and a large dumpster available near the main entrance.

The upside is that you can easily walk/bike to the Big Tent RV Show and just about anywhere in Quartzsite, the downside is that you can hear the incessant hum of Interstate 10. The managers are kind people but bring your patient hat!

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access to town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Close to Quartzsite

Free dispersed camping, about 3 miles north of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. No trash service here, but area is very close to the Refuse Transfer Station off Hwy 95.

Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area.

Unlike some of the other BLM land nearby where many RVers were using solar panels, nearly everyone here at Plomosa was using a generator.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about everything a camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Near Downtown

Free dispersed camping, about 2 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area. The major drawback is that you can hear the traffic on Interstate 10. Many RVers use solar panels for all or at least part of their power needs though, so generator use is minimal.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Near Quartzsite

Free dispersed camping, about 20 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. The major drawback is that you can hear the traffic on Interstate 10. We stayed here for just one night, as we were approaching Quartzsite at dusk and didn’t want to mess with finding a spot in the midst of the crowds after dark. It was a nice, easy stop for the night and put us within 30 minutes of town.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

BLM at its best!

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and just 2.5 miles out of town. You cannot hear Interstate 10 or Hwy 95 if you choose a site close to the mountains.

Services available on-site include a few extremely well-maintained pit toilets and trash dumpsters. By paying the fee, you also have access to both potable/non-potable water and a sewage dump at La Posa South, just a few miles down Hwy 95. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region. Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

We stayed for a 5 days and found this area very quiet and peaceful. Just a few RVers were running gas generators, while most had solar panels, which always makes things more pleasant. Some folks have their area established for the season hence the funny signs around the property.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking, mountain biking, and OHV trails. There are some Native American petroglyphs and grinding holes south of this area, along the main wash (accessible via mountain bike or OHV). Ask the BLM office for details as they are tricky to find, but worth it.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Basic BLM camping

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and just 1 mile outside of town, though you cannot hear either Interstate 10 or Hwy 95 if you choose a site close to the mountains. Trash dumpsters are the only service available on site, but by paying the fee, you also have access to very clean pit toilets, both potable/non-potable water, and a sewage dump at La Posa South, just a couple miles down Hwy 95. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region. Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Amazing BLM Camping with it ALL!

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and just 4 miles outside of town. You cannot hear either Interstate 10 or Hwy 95 if you choose a site close to the mountains. Services available on-site include a few pit toilets, trash dumpsters, potable/non-potable water and a sewage dump. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region. Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Walking Distance to Town

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and within walking/biking distance of town, though you can hear the incessant hum of Interstate 10 on the northern most end of this area.

Services available on-site include a few pit toilets and trash dumpsters. By paying the fee, you also have access to both potable/non-potable water and a sewage dump at La Posa South, just a few miles down Hwy 95. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region.

Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Next to the Big Tent RV Show

A big dusty parking lot of RV’s with both full hook-ups electric/water/sewer and dry camping options. There are a couple of clean flush toilets and a large dumpster available near the main entrance. The managers are sweet and helpful people and have been in the area for years!

The upside is that you can easily walk/bike to the Big Tent RV Show and just about anywhere in downtown Quartzsite, the downside is that you can hear the incessant hum of Interstate 10 and during January show time, it is crowded. We stayed here during the duration of the Big Tent RV Show in 2019 (10 days), while working the Renogy solar booth and easily walked back and forth every day.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access to town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Gorgeous Views

Free dispersed camping, just 5 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. This BLM area seemed to have less traffic and you could not hear the incessant hum of traffic on Interstate 10. You could hear a bit from Hwy 95, but it’s much less frequent and annoying.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Close to Town

Free dispersed camping, just 3.5 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area. The major drawback is that you can hear the traffic on Interstate 10. Combine that with the folks running generators and the noise might drive you further out of town. To be fair, many RVers use solar panels for all or at least part of their power needs.

Scaddan Wash is the site of the annual RubberTramp Rendezvous, held during early January. The famed RTR is a gathering of like-minded mobile dwellers living in everything from new Class A motorhomes to small home-made truck campers. Everyone is welcome and workshops are free! It’s pretty awesome and the numbers of people coming to this event have doubled nearly each year.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/