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With so many options, it can be hard to decide which Olympic National Forest camping spots are right for you. Spanning over 600,000 acres, the Olympic National Forest encompasses a large part of the Olympic Peninsula and surrounds Olympic National Park. The national forest is one of the few temperate rainforests in the world. It gets over 150 inches of rain a year, making it perhaps the wettest destination in the United States. All that rain makes for lush green canopies and abundant marine life. With such a unique environment, it’s no wonder so many people visit the rainforest. We’re here to make the trip easier for you by providing the eight best Olympic National Forest camping spots.

Best Olympic National Forest Camping Spots

1. Kalaloch Campground

Green tent in the lush Olympic National Forest.

Image from The Dyrt camper Scott-Christy B.

The Kalaloch Campground (pronounced “clay-lock”) is on the southwest coast of the Olympic Peninsula, overlooking the vast Pacific Ocean. The campground has sites for tents and non-electric RVs, with fire rings, storage lockers, flush toilets, and direct beach access. You’re right next to several scenic overlooks, the Kalaloch Creek Nature Trail, and Ruby Beach. If you’re lucky, you’ll catch a glimpse of the elusive bald eagles and puffins. Kalaloch is a popular place to camp so reserve your site ahead of time. If you’re visiting in the off-season, sites are first-come-first-served.

“This campground is located in a really nice location, surrounded by the ocean forest, higher than sea level, and all spots are a quick walk down to the sand. We had a pull in spot, there are small and large RV spots here also. Fire rings and clean restrooms on site, RV dump it looked like also. Another plus is that THE TREE OF LIFE is located right on this location.”Jr & Jade S.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $24-48
  • Number of sites: 170
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

2. Fairholme Campground

The Fairholme Campground is on the west end of striking Crescent Lake. The campground has non-electric, lakeside sites for tents and RVs, with fire pits, flush toilets, equipment rentals, and a boat ramp. You have direct access to Crescent Lake and the Olympic Discovery Trail. Sites are first-come-first-served, so arrive early to snag the best spot. A short drive from the campground you’ll find tons of hiking trails, scenic overlooks, and relaxing hot springs. Fairholme is an excellent jumping-off place to explore the variety of ecosystems in the Olympic National Forest.

“Fairholme sits above Lake Crescent in Olympic National Park. The lake is a clear, deep blue lake. So pretty. The campground sits on the side of a hill, so if you’re in an RV, van, or tent trailer, bring your levelers. The sites for camping are awesome…some are right on the lake. All the other sites are up on the hill, forested, with no views of the lake. All sites are a short walk to the lake though, which was nice.” – Blaine B.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $24
  • Number of sites: 88
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

3. Salt Creek Recreation Area

Two dogs overlooking the Olympic Peninsula in Olympic National Park.

Image from The Dyrt camper Sommer C.

The Salt Creek campground is next to the Salish Sea, straddling Crescent Lake and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The campground has spacious year-round sites for tents and RVs, with electric hookups, flush toilets, showers, and beach access. You’re centrally located to explore several beautiful beaches, so bring your kayak or SUP board. The campground is also right next to the Tongue Point Marine Sanctuary, one of the most diverse tide pools in the area. You can reserve your spot during the busy season, but off-season sites are first-come-first-served.

“This is one of my favorite places to go camping, I absolutely love it here. Your right on the ocean and the views are spectacular. The campsites are very nice and clean and you can walk right down to the beach and enjoy the water, it’s such a relaxing place to be, I love this campground.”Juli

Campground Details:

  • Price: $22-32
  • Number of sites: 92
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

4. Hoh Rain Forest

The Hoh Rain Forest Campground runs adjacent to the Hoh River (pronounced “hoe”). The campground has sites for tents and non-electric RVs, with fire rings, flush toilets, and storage lockers. If you want to experience the rainforest, the Hoh campground is the place to be. It’s the only campground located within the boundaries of the Hoh Rainforest. You’re right next to the Hoh River Trail, Hall of Mosses, and Spruce Nature Trail, where you can see some of the largest trees in the world. The Hoh campground is a sought-after destination during the high season, so reserve your site early. If you’re visiting in the off-season, sites are first-come-first-served.

“While the park itself is smaller than you would imagine, the campground it provides is simply amazing! You’re definitely in a rain forest, but there’s also a beautiful blue waters of the river nearby and some mountain views. You’re super close to the visitor center and the trails at the Park provides. The bathroom facilities here were also great. Would recommend getting here early as it fills up pretty fast”Brooke H.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $24-48
  • Number of sites: 72
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

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5. Dosewallips

Point of view image from hammock at campsite with picnic table and orange tent.

Image from The Dyrt camper Art S.

The Dosewallips campground straddles the Dosewallips River and Hood Canal. The campground has reservable tent and RV sites, and cabin rentals. Amenities include fire rings, flush toilets, showers, and incredible views. You can hike the nearby trails, check out the local bird species, or go hunting for oysters. The Dosewallips campground gives you an immersive experience of the eastern side of the peninsula. Take your pick between freshwater or saltwater, enjoy the lush green forest, and marvel at the herd of elk roaming around.

“This is a large campground with all the camping options. They have tent sites, platform tents, cabins and RV hookups. This is located on both the Hood Canal and the Dosewallips river. This provides lots of activities like hiking, fishing, clam digging and exploring. There are several camp sites located on the river. The campground is well maintained year round.”Rich M.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $20-50
  • Number of sites: 123
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

6. Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort Campground

The Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort Campground and RV Park is in the Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort (pronounced “sole-duck”). The campground has two tent-only loops and a separate RV loop. The reservable tent sites come with fire rings, storage lockers, and flush toilets. Reservable back-in RV sites include full hookups, hydrants, and close access to restaurants. The defining features of Sol Duc are the three incredible hot spring pools and freshwater pool. Relax in the hot springs and let your troubles melt away while the kiddos splash around in the large mineral pool. Then check out the hiking trails and boat tours, or grab a massage. Your stay at the Sol Duc campground will calm the mind and soothe the soul.

“While all the campsites were a bit close on Loop A, we hardly even heard or noticed anyone. It was amazing to fall asleep with the Sol Duc river close by and a nice little hike to the Sol Duc falls simply made this camping weekend amazing!!”Suzie L.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $21-40
  • Number of sites: 98
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

7. Sequim Bay

Sunset glow through the forest at a campground in the Olympic Peninsula.

Image from The Dyrt camper Esther Y.

The Sequim Bay campground is on the northeast end of the Olympic Peninsula, along the tranquil shores of Sequim Bay (pronounced “skwim”). This marine campground offers spacious reservable sites for tents and RVs, with fire rings, flush toilets, showers, and a boat ramp. Explore the beaches for shellfish, go fishing in the calm Sequim Bay, or play sports in one of the park’s courts. If you’re feeling adventurous, check out a local section of the Olympic Discovery Trail or search for wildlife. Due to Sequim Bay’s location, it’s the perfect place to go for marine enthusiasts and adventurers looking for a more arid climate.

“This is a nice wooded campground located right off Hwy101 and on Sequim Bay. Boat launch and at low tide a pebble beach make this a great spot for water recreation. Some campsites are waterfront (#80-82 have best views) and others have partial water views through the trees. The Olympic Discovery Trail runs through the park making this an ideal spot for people wanting a protected and scenic bike trail cycling experience. Some hike-bike-in only sites as well.”Emma A.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $20-50
  • Number of sites: 60
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

8. Ocean City

The Ocean City State Park campground is located on the southwest side of the Olympic Peninsula, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The campground has reservable sites for tents and RVs, with amenities like full hookups, fire rings, flush toilets, and horse rentals. You’re steps from the ocean, where you can enjoy the surf and sand, go clamming, or hike local trails. The campground is also near the quaint town of Ocean Shores, where you can play a round of golf and grab a bite to eat. And don’t miss the North Bay Natural Preserve, where you’ll find rare birds and other wildlife. The Ocean City campground is a great place for families who want to get away for some quality family time.

“If an ideal camping trip is one with your tent pitched in a wooded setting, but you love to spend time on the beach, this state park is for you. Make sure you can get a reservation before coming in or you can wind up getting a spot for one night but have to move to another the next day. But, nicely laid out campground, very short walk to the beach, wildlife is pretty abundant.”Erinn B.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $20-50
  • Number of sites: 178
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed:Yes

The novelty of the Pacific Northwest’s rainforest leaves a lasting impression. With miles of hiking trails, shorelines, and woodlands, you’ll see species of animals and plant life you never thought possible. Check out these Olympic National Forest camping spots for the most memorable trip of your life.

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