This article about camping near Honolulu is sponsored by Banner & Oak. Check out Banner & Oak’s snapback hats to beat the heat at these campgrounds.


There’s nowhere on Earth like the Hawaiian Islands. If you have the good luck to find yourself with a free weekend to camp when you’re on Oahu, don’t miss these top sites.

Most of the campgrounds are located on beaches or tucked away into the woods nearby. You will need a permit to camp there, and many are only available on the weekends.


1. Bellows Field Beach Park

wide shot of beach, ocean, and bluffs

Image from The Dyrt camper Alan B.

White sand beaches edge the east side of Oahu, a half-hour’s drive from Honolulu. It’s a secure location because the park is closed from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m., with only campers allowed on-site.





An active military training area, Bellows Field Beach Park is a beautiful respite for campers on a stunning beach stretch on the windward side of the island. This campsite is open on the weekends only.

“It’s popular for swimming, body surfing, and kite surfing. You can get supplies and food in Waimanalo or Kailua to the north.”Steve & Ashley G.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $21-40
  • Number of sites: 50
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

2. Malaekahana State Recreation Area

blue ocean and white beach

Image from The Dyrt camper Crystal C.

On the tip of Oahu’s northeastern coast is one of the most beautiful beaches in Hawaii and, arguably, the world. There are two camping sections – Kalanai and Kahuku – and tons of beach-related amenities like 37 acres include yurts and grass shacks.

Close to the Polynesian Cultural Center, the waves are great all year round. The stretch of beach fronting Malaekahana State Recreation Area avoids some of the extreme waves that a lot of the North Shore sees in the wintertime.

“I suggest this campground to anyone who is either camping solo like myself or bringing the entire family.” April R.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $10-30
  • Number of sites: 74
  • RV sites: Yes
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: No

3. Sand Island State Rec Area

many playing in the waves at the beach

Image from The Dyrt camper Emily W.

Sand Island is not what you think of when you picture a Hawaiian beach. It was a significant outpost in WWII and still retains the bunkers and concrete of the defense structures.

You need a permit to camp at Sand Island State Rec Area, and you can only camp on the weekends. It’s not the best swimming conditions on the island, but you can still have fun wading and body surfing in the water. You have lovely views of the busy harbor and outstanding sunsets, and you’re only 15 minutes from Honolulu.

“Lovely. The water is great for some body surfing.”Leah P.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $20-30
  • Number of sites: 35
  • RV sites: No
  • Fires allowed: No
  • Pets allowed: Yes

4. Kahana Valley State Park

sea kayaks on the water

Image from The Dyrt campers Steve & Ashley G.

Located near the city of Hauula and only a 40-minute drive from Honolulu, Kahana Valley State Park is one of the last ahupuaʻa of Hawaiin land division left, which means it’s mostly unspoiled. Some challenging hikes wind through lush jungle forests amid archeological sites. It is primitive camping with minimal amenities and breathtaking vistas.

“Every campsite is perfect, all close to the water (and the car) and with beautiful views.”Amber A.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $20-30
  • Number of sites: 10
  • RV sites: No
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

5. Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area

houses in a jungly hillside

Image from The Dyrt camper Tetia C.

A visit to Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area blends the history of two cultures – native Hawaiian and American. With the critical ruins of a healing temple, Keaiwa Heiau, and a gorgeous view of Pearl Harbor, this campground is only a 20-minute drive from Honolulu.

Camping is available from Friday until Wednesday by reservation at these primitive sites. You’ll have to bring in everything you need if you get one of these coveted 10 spots.

“The stars are beautiful out here.”Leah P.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $10-30
  • Number of sites: 10
  • RV sites: No
  • Fires allowed: No
  • Pets allowed: Yes

6. Ho’omaluhia Botanical Garden

two people sitting on grass near the water

Image from The Dyrt camper Mike L.

You can either get a 3- or 5-day permit for camping in the Ho’omaluhia Botanical Garden, 20 minutes northeast of Honolulu, on 400 lush acres. The name Ho’omaluhia means peaceful refuge, and this campground certainly is that. It is very primitive camping with no RV sites and no pets allowed.

“Favorite spot for family camping on Oahu! Free fishing (bring your own bread), easy hiking, and large spread-out campsites make this a great spot to camp with little ones!”Mike L.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $10-30
  • Number of sites: 15
  • RV sites: No
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: No

7. Ahupuaʻa O Kahana State Park

tent next to trees at campground

Image from The Dyrt camper Sarah L.

Tucked into a cove, Ahupuaʻa O Kahana State Park is protected from many fierce winds and waves common to the North Shore. Outdoor showers, toilets, and picnic tables are set on the water under towering palms and scrubby pines. Don’t expect any amenities other than basic ones.

“Good amount of stuff to do around the campsite. It makes for a fun weekend activity with family/friends.” Sarah I.

Campground Details:

  • Price: $12-30
  • Number of sites: 10
  • RV sites: No
  • Fires allowed: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

Camping near Honolulu is otherworldly. These campgrounds are only the beginning of the coastal camping options available on the island. For hundreds more, check out The Dyrt’s full list of the best camping in Hawaii.


This article about camping near Honolulu was brought to you by Banner & Oak

banner and oak hat

Their collection of ladies hats are the perfect companion for a Honolulu adventure.

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