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Places to Camp in Hawaii

Hawaii is known for its beautiful beaches, stunning views of Diamond Head, and relaxed way of life. But one thing that is often overlooked by visitors (and really shouldn’t be!) is the amazing experience of camping in Hawaii.

The Hawaiian Islands are made up of eight main islands, including Hawaii, Maui, Oahu, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Kauai and Niihau. Each one offers unique camping experiences and different activities.

Oahu, home to the city of Honolulu, and the most populated island, offers a unique blend of city comforts and tropical vibes. The southernmost coast is where you’ll find popular tourist destinations like Diamond Head, Waikiki Beach, and Hanauma Bay. Due to the number of people that live on this part of the island, there are limited camping areas, but just a short drive makes a big difference.

On Oahu’s Windward coast, expect stunning views of the Ko’olau mountains and the turquoise waters of Lanikai and Kailua. Bellows is a great camping spot right on the beach away from the bustle of Honolulu, and only a few minutes drive from the popular Maunawili hike trailhead. Permits are required to go camping in Hawaii, and sites usually book up in advance, so be sure to call a few weeks ahead if you want to get a spot.

If relaxing in nature and getting away from the crowd is what you’re after, Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area, located inland near Aiea, provides visitors with lush forest views, and is the site of a former temple of Hawaiian healing. It is also near the trailhead for the Aiea Loop Trail, a popular 4.5 mile hike with stunning mountain vistas, and is just a short drive away from Pearl Harbor.

The Big Island, the largest of the Hawaiian islands and known for its diverse landscape and constantly flowing lava, is another great option if you are looking to do some camping in Hawaii. Camping permits are available for Punalu’u, Hawaii’s famous black sand beach, which has a reputation for great snorkeling and fishing and for sea turtle sightings. You can also snag one of 16 campsites in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Sites are available on a first come, first served basis, and although it’s a little more rustic (there are restrooms but no showers), it’s probably worth it to be able to camp at “one of the most unique campsites to visit in the world”.

Whether you’re camping in Hawaii for the first time, or just looking for a new favorite spot, The Dyrt has you covered.

Best Camping Sites in Hawaii (93)

    Camper-submitted photo from Mālaekahana State Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Mālaekahana State Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Mālaekahana State Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Mālaekahana State Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Mālaekahana State Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Mālaekahana State Recreation Area

    1.

    Mālaekahana State Recreation Area

    22 Reviews
    73 Photos
    31 Saves
    Wahiawa, Hawaii
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • Tents
    Camper-submitted photo from Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground

    2.

    Waiʻanapanapa State Park Campground

    19 Reviews
    110 Photos
    103 Saves
    Haleakala National Park, Hawaii

    When it comes to camping locations in paradise, Waianapanapa State Park remains an unspoiled gem. Low, volcanic cliffs envelop the sparkling black sand lagoon below. Located at the end of Waiʻanapanapa Road off Hana Highway, this park offers a wide range of scenic views, tropical hikes, and tons of unique recreation opportunities. Those looking for solitude and respite from the day-to-day grind of modern life are sure to enjoy this secluded campground.

    Waianapanapa is unique in that it’s one of the few places where you can enjoy dark, volcanic sand beaches. Even cooler, throughout the year the various tide pools throughout turn a deep shade of maroon-red. Scientists attribute this to the shrimp colonies that visit throughout the year. However, locals say it’s a due to a haunting from the blood of Popoaleae, a mythical princess who was killed by her husband Chief Kaakea in a cave nearby. We’ll let you decide what you want to believe.

    The campsites here are spacious enough to accomodate any tent or van dweller, but RVers aren’t going to find much accomodation here. The campground includes bathrooms, drinking water, an outdoor beach shower, fire pits, and tons of hikes nearby. In addition, the park grants access to shore fishing, snorkelling and scuba destinations nearby. Waianapanapa is also known for it’s natural blow-holes scattered through the park, and its world-class sea-bird watching.

    Waianapanapa State Park is massive, featuring over 122 acres of unspoiled volcanic terrain. However, parking is limited and the campground itself is on the small side. If you’re looking to camp here, reservations must be made at least 3 days prior to your check-in date. For HI residents, fees are $12 per night for up to 6 people, and $2 per night for every person thereafter. If you’re not a resident, fees are $18/night, with an addition charge of $3 per additional camper. Additionally, the park also offers Cabins on reservation at $60/night for residents, and $90/night for visitors. That being said, if you’re planning on camping in a cabin be aware there is a 2 day minimum. If you’re the type to procrastinate, definitely take care of your reservations in advance as they are strict about permitting here.

    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • RVs
    • Cabins
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $12 - $90 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Camp Olowalu
    Camper-submitted photo from Camp Olowalu
    Camper-submitted photo from Camp Olowalu
    Camper-submitted photo from Camp Olowalu
    Camper-submitted photo from Camp Olowalu
    Camper-submitted photo from Camp Olowalu

    3.

    Camp Olowalu

    18 Reviews
    71 Photos
    110 Saves
    Lahaina, Hawaii

    COVID-19 regulations: we are following all local, state and federal regulations regarding COVID-19, and recommend our guests to comply with current mandates and travel requirements to Hawaii and inter-island before making a reservation.

    PRE-CHECK IS REQUIRED FOR ALL INTER-ISLAND AND OUT-OF-STATE RESERVATIONS! AS OF OCTOBER 15, 2020, all inter-island and out-of-state visitors must prove the completion of the quarantine requirement or provide validated Safe Travels Hawai’i/DOH quarantine exemption. Documentation must be submitted via email to reservations@campolowalu.com, before 2PM on check-in day. Guests in non-compliance with the pre-check requirement will not be able to enter the campground. CAMP OLOWALU IS NOT A QUARANTINE SITE.

    Currently, reservations are open for tent sites, car camping, tentalows (no linens provided) and A-frame cabins. The camp store will remain closed until further notice; morning complimentary coffee is also discontinued.

    Camp on one of the 35 sites. Alongside Maui’s Olowalu Beach enjoy our campground amenities.

    Tent camping Tentalows Car Camping Cabins

    COMMON AMENITIES

    Bathrooms: toilet, sink, mirror, hand soap, paper towels & toilet paper
    Instant hot water showers
    Outdoor dishwashing station
    Wifi internet hotspot at check-in area
    Trash & recycling stations
    Private parking
    2 Charging stations
    Fire pit
    Picnic benches
    BBQ grills
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • RVs

    $24 - $1600 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park

    4.

    Hosmer Grove Campground — Haleakalā National Park

    18 Reviews
    53 Photos
    69 Saves
    Haleakala National Park, Hawaii

    Haleakalā Volcano, on the Hawaiian island of Maui, is a massive shield volcano that rises more than 10,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean, and makes up more than 75% of the island’s land mass. Its name, Haleakalā, is Hawaiian for “House of the Sun,” and is steeped in Hawaiian legend. More modern references attribute it to the spectacular sunrises observed from the rim of the summit crater. In an effort to preserve and protect the volcano’s spectacular summit crater, as well as the Kipahulu Valley rainforest on the volcano’s eastern slope, Haleakalā National Park was established in 1961. The majority of visitors to the park drive the long, winding road to the summit viewpoints and visitor center. The small number of adventurers who descend into the crater can explore an otherworldly landscape of colorful cinder cones, lava flows and other volcanic features.

    For those interested in a little primitive camping on the flank of this sleeping giant, the Hosmer Grove Campground provides close access to the summit’s viewing areas and hiking trails. The campground is located partway up the mountain, just 0.5 mile past the park’s entrance station. From Kahului, it’s only about 28 miles, but the winding road makes the drive pretty slow. Hosmer Grove offers 10 campsites in a large, grassy area surrounded by foreign and native woods. Campsites have picnic tables and cooking grills, and vault toilets are available. Campfires are not permitted, but contained camp stoves are allowed. The campground is situated at 7,000 feet above sea level, right in Haleakalā’s “cloud belt,” so it’s often cool and foggy, and overnight temps can plummet below freezing. Free camping is first-come, first-served, with a three-night limit..

    Taking in Haleakalā’s summit sunrise show requires making a long, slow, winding drive up the mountain in the blackness of night to reach the viewing areas before sunrise. In efforts to alleviate road and parking congestion at the summit, the national park has implemented a permit requirement to access the viewing areas. These can be obtained up to 60 days in advance from the recreation.gov website. Permits are only required for driving up the mountain between 3am and 7am. Dress warmly, as it is cold on the summit rim. Hikers will find more than 30 miles of trails that journey down into the crater for exploring its many features. There is no shade or water on the crater floor, and temperatures can vary significantly, so pack along plenty of water and sunscreen. Also, due to the soft, sandy nature of the trails, plan on spending twice as much time to hike out as to hike in.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    Camper-submitted photo from Polihale State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Polihale State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Polihale State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Polihale State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Polihale State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Polihale State Park Campground

    5.

    Polihale State Park Campground

    15 Reviews
    68 Photos
    46 Saves
    Kapa‘a, Hawaii

    WARNING: The road leading to Polihale State Park is an unimproved dirt road that may flood during rains and become impassable. Other areas have deep sand. Four-wheel drive vehicles are required to access the park. Rental car companies prohibit use of their vehicles on the Polihale State Park access road.

    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • Tents
    • Group

    $20 - $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    6.

    Nāmakanipaio Campground — Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    16 Reviews
    53 Photos
    42 Saves
    Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

    Nāmakanipaio Campground is located 31.5 miles south of Hilo on Highway-11 at 4,000' elevation. It is a large, open grassy area with tall eucalyptus and 'ōhi'a trees. This campground has restrooms, water, picnic tables and barbecue pits. Campfires are permitted in the barbeque pits only. If there are more than 2 people in your party, you can expand to 4 people per site with another tent. Maximum stay is 7 days.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • RVs
    Camper-submitted photo from Bellows Field Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Bellows Field Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Bellows Field Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Bellows Field Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Bellows Field Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Bellows Field Beach Park

    7.

    Bellows Field Beach Park

    15 Reviews
    28 Photos
    67 Saves
    Kailua, Hawaii

    Bellows Field Beach Park is located on a beautiful stretch of windward beach and holds fifty campsites. It is also a part of an active military training area. Campgrounds are not available before 12 noon on Friday. Bellows camping is closed between the hours of 8 p.m and 6 a.m. and no one is allowed to enter. Campers must remain in their designated camping area during those hours. A printed permit is required to camp in this park. All fees are non-refundable.

    Facilities 50 campsites total 2 Comfort Stations Outdoor Showers 2 Lifeguard Towers Limited parking

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Anini Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Anini Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Anini Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Anini Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Anini Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Anini Beach Park

    8.

    Anini Beach Park

    10 Reviews
    39 Photos
    53 Saves
    Kapa‘a, Hawaii

    Anini Beach Park campground closes each Tuesday at 10AM for maintenance and reopens at 12PM each Wednesday. For more information on camping at Anini Beach Park or to obtain a camping permit contact the Kauai Parks Permitting Section at 808-241-4463 or email recpermits@kauai.gov.

    • Pets
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Dispersed

    $3 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Hā’ena State Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hā’ena State Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hā’ena State Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hā’ena State Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hā’ena State Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Hā’ena State Park

    9.

    Hā’ena State Park

    10 Reviews
    23 Photos
    25 Saves
    Kapa‘a, Hawaii

    Hā’ena State Park is located at the northwestern extent of Kuhio Highway on Kauai’s north-shore. The park offers viewing of restored lo’i kalo (taro field, as well as, the spectacular Nāpali Coast State Wilderness Park. The park also offers beach-related activities including shore fishing and swimming at Ke’e Beach. Hā’ena is also home to the trailhead of the world famous Kalalau Trail [11 miles], as well as, Hanakāpīʻai Falls trail [4 miles].

    • Pets
    • Reservable
    • Tents
    • Trash
    • Picnic Table
    • Showers

    $3 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Salt Pond Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Salt Pond Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Salt Pond Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Salt Pond Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Salt Pond Beach Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Salt Pond Beach Park

    10.

    Salt Pond Beach Park

    10 Reviews
    29 Photos
    22 Saves
    Kapa‘a, Hawaii

    Salt Pond Beach Park campground closes each Tuesday at 10AM for maintenance and reopens at 12PM each Wednesday. Lifeguards on duty at Salt Pond Beach Park from 9AM to 5PM daily.

    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Trash

    $5 - $150 / night

Showing results 1-10 of 93 campgrounds

Pet-friendly camping in Hawaii

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346 Reviews of 93 Hawaii Campgrounds