At The Dyrt, we share camping tips from our community of campers and campgrounds. With so many campers staying home, we continue to share this info so you can plan future camping trips across the U.S.

Do you remember that scene in Wild where Cheryl Strayed thinks she’s being stalked by a mountain lion and she starts singing every song she knows to scare it off?

Imagine if instead of struggling to remember the lyrics to “Country Roads,” Strayed could have sung along to the real deal while keeping an ear out for nearby wildlife with Aftershokz bone conduction headhones.

Last month, The Dyrt team attended Outdoor Retailer and discovered some cool new ways that people are listening to outdoor music during their favorite activities. Here are four we think you’ll like.

4 Ways to Keep the Music Alive Outside

Music is with us all the time, conjuring up memories, even when we are hundreds of miles from the nearest record store.





1. Waterproof Speakers

I love having my favorite songs saved for outdoor use when camping, but the ol’ throw your phone in a cup to amplify the music trick isn’t ideal.

Outdoor Tech’s waterproof Turtle Shell speakers might be the answer for campground tunes — even in the rainy Pacific Northwest where they’ll probably get wet. The twenty-hour lifespan will provide several nights worth of outdoor music without needing to plug in.

2. Tangle-Free, Durable Earphones

Like Strayed in Wild, I could really use a good pair of headphones.  Otterbox’s bluetooth rubber-clad earphones reduce tangles and can take a beating. We already trust this brand to keep our phones safe with their super durable phone cases. Now they’ve got earphones with metal housing and connectors for equally durable tunes. You won’t have to worry about crushing them in your backpack.

Wear them trail running or while you pitch the tent.

3. Wave-Ready Beats

Just a few years ago surf rock was stuck on the shore, rather than out on the board. Now there’s a thing called The Barnacle — it’s a speaker and flash drive in one, and can handle being dunked. It can be mounted to a board or a bike, so it can go up and down the beach with you, or up and down the halfpipe. I’m a mountain girl who’s never had a chance to hang ten, but I can totally see bringing a Barnacle on board next time I go rafting, kayaking, or tubing down a lazy river.

4. Headphones That Don’t Drown Out Nature

Instead of plugging your ears and drowning out the noise around you, these headphones from Aftershokz allow you to embrace both your surroundings and your tunes. When you’re outside, it’s important to be aware of your surroundings. Aftershokz Trekz Air direct music through your cheekbones instead of your ear canals, so you can still hear your friends, fellow hikers, and even the crackle of the campfire.

Whatever you’re into, it’s completely rad living in an era when our tunes can come along for the ride.


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  • Meghan O'Dea

    Meghan O'Dea

    Meghan O'Dea is a writer, world traveler, and life-long learner who grew up in the foothills of Appalachia. College led to summer stints in England and Slovenia, grad school to a sojourn Hong Kong, and curiosity to everywhere in between. She has written for the Washington Post, Fortune Magazine, Yoga Journal, Eater Magazine, and Uproxx amongst others. Meghan hopes to visit all seven continents with pen and paper in tow.