At The Dyrt, we share camping tips from our community of campers and campgrounds. With so many campers staying home, we continue to share this info so you can plan future camping trips across the U.S.

If you don’t know what a teardrop trailer is, get ready for some serious camp envy.

Back in the 1940’s, after the white flags of WWII had been waved, the economy was booming and our national highway system was well on its way to connecting land and sea, urban and suburban, and everything in between. It became easier than ever to load up the kids and stake your claim at a local campground.

Soon the hassle wasn’t how do we get there, but how can we make this easier. If you’ve ever had to load up three antsy kids and a rambunctious dog into a Station Wagon, you too have probably wished for a better solution.

And so, the teardrop trailer was born. 70 years later they’re making a come back, and for good reason. From customization to sheer simplicity, here’s why we’re obsessed with teardrops.





Once you’re convinced tear-drop trailer are just the best, be sure to download The Dyrt Pro for your next adventure. With the upgraded version of The Dyrt app, you can access campgrounds, maps, and photos for offline use during your adventures. 

They Go Anywhere

Not only can they be towed behind almost any vehicle (including a Prius), they’re also fully customizable. Whether you’re looking to venture down rocky dirt roads, or cruising along Route 66, there’s a teardrop for you.

Not only does the teardrop go anywhere, but it can stay anywhere. Gone are the days of maneuvering your Sprinter van into parallel parking spots in downtown San Francisco. Leave your teardrop at Yosemite, and take the Subaru on a scenic drive to the bay area. Less stress, more fun.

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It’s DIY-Able

Even if you aren’t an everyday handyman, you can create your own teardrop trailer via the Mechanix Illustrated (circa 1947!) instructions. If the blueprints aren’t doing it for you, a more up-do-date, step-by-step outline exists at TheTeardropTrailer.com.

We love that ordinary humans like us could make something like this from scratch (supposedly).

Teardrop Trailer original design

©Mechanix Illustrated

 Simplicity

With just enough space for two people to sleep, and an open kitchen beneath the rear hatch, the teardrop trailer is everything you need in a 12’x5′ space. Most trailers include drawers in the sleeping area to store clothes and other essential items.

If there aren’t enough nooks and crannies in the trailer itself, you can always add storage to the frame of the trailer.

 


Prepare for your next adventure in your tear-drop trailer by downloading maps. The Dyrt Pro lets you download maps and campgrounds without cell service. “My alternative to using pro would be to drive back out to cell service”.


 

Fully Customizable

You can add what you need and ditch what you don’t. If you have a few kids in tow, installing a fold out tent on top of the trailer creates additional sleeping space. If you and your partner are DINK’s (Double Income No Kids), and you’re living out of the trailer part-time, build out the kitchen, install a canopy, heck integrate a sound system!

With a teardrop trailer, the opportunities are endless.

They’re ADORABLE

Just look at them!

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  • Megan Walsh

    Megan Walsh

    Megan dreams of one day being a professional recreationalist, and welcomes any and all tips on how to get there. When she isn’t climbing, skiing, or enjoying shavasana, she’s drinking coffee and furiously typing away at her computer––or watching Netflix. Her work has been featured in Climbing Magazine, Utah Adventure Journal, and on Moja Gear.