Places to Camp in Utah

Utah is primarily known for two things: its world-class skiing and winding slot canyons. But the Beehive State has much more to offer the outdoor enthusiast. It's home to five national parks and eight national monuments. And that's just the beginning. There is no shortage of exotic camping in Utah.

For desert dwellers, Monument Valley never disappoints. It’s the kind of place that leaves a person searching for meaning. When the sun dips below the monuments and the sky radiates with color, it’s easy to see why the Navajo people revere the land. Media buffs will also recognize the familiar landmarks from film and TV. Those visiting Bears Ears can see Monument Valley in the distance from campsites like Muley Point.

Campers who visit Goblin Valley get a unique experience. An amphitheater of bizarrely-shaped hoodoos greets visitors. Even though there are hoodoos all over Utah, none compare to the “goblins” in this state park. They make an excellent backdrop for photos, adventure, games, and soul-searching.

A worthy Utah destination is Zion National Park, growing more popular by the year. The etched canyon walls make a lasting impression, as they jut thousands of feet up from the earth. The sense of perspective visitors experience keeps them coming back. The Watchman campground is a popular choice for campers. It offers accessibility to trails, the Virgin River, a shuttle bus, and the adjacent town.

Many will also make a trip to nearby Bryce Canyon National Park, to see the infamous spires. Staying at the North campground is a great way to see the best parts of the park.

It doesn’t take a road trip to go camping in Utah. The state capital, Salt Lake City, butts up against the Wasatch Mountains. Fifteen minutes up one of the canyons is all it takes to trade city noise for alpine meadows and lakes. In the summer, Albion Basin blooms with color. Red Pine Lake is a secluded campsite with two lakes and frequent wildlife sightings.

For a different kind of mountain experience, the Uinta Mountains aren’t much farther. They’re the only mountain range in the contiguous US that runs east-west. Still part of the Rockies, they’re Utah’s highest range, with King’s Peak topping out at 13,528 feet. Most of the camping is dispersed, but Mirror Lake is a great campground right off the main scenic highway.

There’s something for everyone in the great state of Utah. From the desert climate to the fresh mountain air; unique experiences found only in the land of Zion. With nooks and crannies waiting to be explored, camping in Utah is, indeed, life elevated.

Best Camping Sites in Utah (1,490)

    Camper-submitted photo from Watchman Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Watchman Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Watchman Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Watchman Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Watchman Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Watchman Campground — Zion National Park

    1.

    Watchman Campground — Zion National Park

    229 Reviews
    882 Photos
    1602 Saves
    Springdale, Utah

    Overview

    For visitors to Zion National Park, Watchman Campground is an ideal place to stay. Located near the park's south entrance, the campground is just a short walk from the main visitor center, the Zion Canyon Shuttle System and the adjacent town of Springdale. The canyon and most of the park's trails are only accessible by shuttle bus from approximately March through November each year. Season Dates: Watchman Campground is open year-round. Reservations are available 6 months in advance.__

    Recreation

    Hikers can access three trails directly from the facility: the Watchman Trail, a moderate trail that ascends the peak behind the campground; the Archeology Trail, which offers a light hike to an archeological site nearby; and the Pa'rus Trail, a paved walking and biking trail that runs alongside the river, and the only trail in the park that allows dogs. Although there are no rock climbing routes in the campground, many popular climbs are within a short shuttle bus ride into the main canyon. Use of OHVs and ATVs is prohibited in Zion National Park.

    Facilities

    Hikers can access three trails directly from the facility: the Watchman Trail, a moderate trail that ascends the peak behind the campground; the Archeology Trail, which offers a light hike to an archeological site nearby; and the Pa'rus Trail, a paved walking and biking trail that runs alongside the river, and the only trail in the park that allows dogs. Although there are no rock climbing routes in the campground, many popular climbs are within a short shuttle bus ride into the main canyon. Use of OHVs and ATVs is prohibited in Zion National Park.

    Natural Features

    Zion is known for it's dynamic geologic history and Watchman Campground is no exception. Named for the rocky peak that rises above it, the campground is surrounded by tall sandstone cliffs that glow red and orange during sunrise and sunset. The Virgin River, a narrow but powerful river that has carved out the canyon over time, runs adjacent to the campground. Cottonwood trees surrounding the campsite turn golden in the fall. Most of the campsites are in partial to full sun, however in the Group sites (E-Loop) and the Walk-To sites (F-Loop) visitors may receive some shade under pergulas that are constructed over the picnic tables. Visitors can also cool off in the cold river when temperatures peak during summer. Be Advised: The months of April and May bring an unusual infestation of Tent Caterpillars, which fall from trees onto tents, tables, and unsuspecting campers and can make it quite uncomfortable to sit outside. The months of July and August in particular bring a higher concentration of ants in the campsites, which seem to come out especially after the monsoons, but are present all summer long. Insecticidal treatment by visitors is not permitted.

    Nearby Attractions

    The town of Springdale has shopping, art galleries, restaurants, and a public library. Throughout the year, concerts, festivals, and parades are held in the town.

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (877) 444-6777.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Individual Site: A $10.00 service fee will apply if you modify your reservation or change your stay dates. Cancelling your reservation prior to 11:59 pm Eastern Time two nights before your stay will incur a $10 cancellation fee. Camping reservations cancelled the day before and day of arrival incur a $10 cancellation fee and forfeit the first night's use fee If you need to cancel or modify your reservation after 12:00 am Eastern Time on the day of arrival you must contact campground staff at zion_watchman_campground@nps.gov. Group campsite: Customers who cancel a group site reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents

    $35 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park

    2.

    Devils Garden Campground — Arches National Park

    91 Reviews
    349 Photos
    982 Saves
    Moab, Utah

    Overview

    Devils Garden Campground is located deep within the heart of beautiful Arches National Park in Southeastern Utah, at an elevation of approximately 5200 ft.. The campground is situated among natural sandstone arches and fins and is only 18 miles north of the park's entrance and 23 miles from Moab, Utah.__

    Recreation

    Hiking trails are abundant in Arches, including the Broken Arch Trail, a scenic loop with a trailhead conveniently located within the campground. Trails are varied and offer something for everyone, from the easy 0.3-mile loop around Balanced Rock to the steep and strenuous 3-mile round-trip trail to Delicate Arch. Other recreational activities in the park include guided hiking tours of the Fiery Furnace, an off-road vehicle route, road biking and picnicking.

    Facilities

    Hiking trails are abundant in Arches, including the Broken Arch Trail, a scenic loop with a trailhead conveniently located within the campground. Trails are varied and offer something for everyone, from the easy 0.3-mile loop around Balanced Rock to the steep and strenuous 3-mile round-trip trail to Delicate Arch. Other recreational activities in the park include guided hiking tours of the Fiery Furnace, an off-road vehicle route, road biking and picnicking.

    Natural Features

    The campground is forested with mixed stands of Utah juniper and pinyon pine. Flowering prickly pear cacti, yucca and other desert wildflowers dot the landscape, offering vivid color to the surrounding red rock desert. Arches National Park has the highest concentration of natural arches in the world. Over 2,500 of these unusual rock formations can be found here. Towering spires, fins and balanced rocks complement the arches, creating a remarkable assortment of landforms in a relatively small area. The park is within an arid, high desert environment with hot summers and cold winters.

    Nearby Attractions

    Southeastern Utah offers breathtaking scenery, hiking, road and mountain biking opportunities, rafting and scenic driving routes. Canyonlands National Park and Dead Horse Point State Park are within a 45-minute drive of Arches' entrance. Moab offers numerous restaurants, shops and museums. The desert around Moab is a mountain biker's dream, with hundreds of miles of slickrock and single-track trails for all riding abilities.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $100 - $250 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from South Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from South Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from South Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from South Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from South Campground — Zion National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from South Campground — Zion National Park

    3.

    South Campground — Zion National Park

    92 Reviews
    361 Photos
    837 Saves
    Springdale, Utah

    Overview

    Reservations for South Campground are available up to 14 days before your arrival and may extend up to two days beyond this 14-day booking window.__ For visitors to Zion National Park, South Campground is an ideal place to stay. Located near the park's south entrance, the campground is just a short walk from the main visitor center, the Zion Canyon Shuttle System and the adjacent town of Springdale. The canyon and most of the park's trails are only accessible by shuttle bus from approximately the end of February until the end of November each year. Season Dates: South Campground is open from early March to the end of October. Reservations are available up to 14 days before your arrival. For example, if you want to make a reservation for March 14 to 16, you may book this reservation beginning on March 1. Reservations that extend beyond the 14 day booking window cannot be altered. For reservations more than 14 days ahead of arrival, please check Watchman Campground which offers reservations six months in advance of arrival.

    Recreation

    Hikers can access three trails directly from the facility: the Watchman Trail, a moderate trail that ascends the peak behind the campground; the Archeology Trail, which offers a light hike to an archeological site; and the Pa'rus Trail, a paved walking and biking trail that runs alongside the river, and the only trail in the park that allows dogs. The Zion visitor center and the park shuttles are a short walk from the campground. Many popular rock climbing routes are within a short shuttle bus ride into the main canyon. Use of OHVs and ATVs is prohibited in Zion National Park.

    Facilities

    Hikers can access three trails directly from the facility: the Watchman Trail, a moderate trail that ascends the peak behind the campground; the Archeology Trail, which offers a light hike to an archeological site; and the Pa'rus Trail, a paved walking and biking trail that runs alongside the river, and the only trail in the park that allows dogs. The Zion visitor center and the park shuttles are a short walk from the campground. Many popular rock climbing routes are within a short shuttle bus ride into the main canyon. Use of OHVs and ATVs is prohibited in Zion National Park.

    Natural Features

    Zion is known for its dynamic geologic history. The South Campground and Amphitheater were built by the Civilian Conservation Corp in the early 1930s. The project was completed and opened to the public in the spring of 1935. The Virgin River, a narrow but powerful river that has carved out the canyon over time, runs adjacent to the site. Cottonwood trees surrounding the campsite turn golden in the fall. Although the campground is moderately forested, most of the campsites are in partial to full sun but visitors can cool off in the cold river when temperatures peak during summer. Be Advised: The months of April and May bring an unusual infestation of Tent Caterpillars, which fall from trees onto tents, tables, and unsuspecting campers and can make it quite uncomfortable to sit outside. The months of July and August in particular bring a higher concentration of ants in the campsites, which seem to come out especially after the monsoons, but are present all summer long. August and September bring yellowjackets. Insecticidal treatment by visitors is not permitted.

    Nearby Attractions

    The town of Springdale has shopping, art galleries, shower facilities, restaurants. equipment rental businesses, gas stations, markets, bike rentals, library and health clinic.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Individual Site: A $10.00 service fee will apply if you modify your reservation or change your stay dates. Cancelling your reservation prior to 11:59 pm Eastern Time two nights before your stay will incur a $10 cancellation fee. Camping reservations cancelled the day before and day of arrival incur a $10 cancellation fee and forfeit the first night's use fee. If you need to cancel or modify your reservation after 12:00 am Eastern Time the day of your arrival you must contact campground staff at zion_south_campground@nps.gov.__ Group campsite: Customers who cancel a group site reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $50 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

    4.

    Lone Rock Beach Primitive Camping Area — Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

    91 Reviews
    283 Photos
    1309 Saves
    Big Water, Utah

    No reservations. $14 per vehicle/per night in addition to entry fees. Primitive camping is on a sandy beach or in dunes. No designated campsites. Open fires permitted, must be within four foot squared area. Quiet time 10pm-6am. 4 micro flush toilets, 6 vault toilets, 1 comfort station/wheelchair accessible, outdoor cold shower, Off Road Vehicle area, dump station, potable water (seasonal), and day use area. No launch ramp.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $14 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park

    5.

    Fruita Campground — Capitol Reef National Park

    79 Reviews
    365 Photos
    154 Saves
    Torrey, Utah

    Overview

    Located in south-central Utah in the heart of red rock country, Capitol Reef National Park is a hidden treasure filled with cliffs, canyons, domes and bridges in the Waterpocket Fold, a geologic monocline (a wrinkle on the earth) extending almost 100 miles. The Fruita Campground has 71 sites. 65 sites are reservable from March 1 to October 31. Sites 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8 are used as administrative sites. Sites 14, 24, and 63 are accessible sites with electrical hookups. Beginning August 1, 2023 generators are only allowed in loop C. There are no first come first serve sites during peak season.

    Recreation

    Walk to historic inscriptions on the Capitol Gorge Trail and stroll the Goosenecks Trail. Visitors looking for longer trails can explore Cohab Canyon, Chimney Rock and Cassidy Arch. Enjoy the geology and view the Fremont petroglyph panels along Hwy 24. In addition, the Scenic Drive will introduce you to the fascinating cultural and geological history of Capitol Reef National Park. The drive includes a portion of the original road through the Waterpocket Fold. The road passes through parts of the Fruita Historic District and follows the western faces of the Waterpocket Fold, and spur roads allow exploration into beautiful Grand Wash and Capitol Gorge. Check at the visitor center for a current schedule of interpretive programs, which may include geology talks, Fremont culture talks, evening programs, star gazing, moonwalks and geology hikes. Stop in at Ripple Rock Nature Center to experience interactive exhibits, games, activities and free educational programs. Wander through the historic Fruita orchards and pick fresh fruit when in season. The orchards contain approximately 3,100 trees including cherry, apricot, peach, pear, apple, plum, mulberry, almond and walnut. Discover Mormon pioneer history at the historic Gifford House store and museum.

    Facilities

    Walk to historic inscriptions on the Capitol Gorge Trail and stroll the Goosenecks Trail. Visitors looking for longer trails can explore Cohab Canyon, Chimney Rock and Cassidy Arch. Enjoy the geology and view the Fremont petroglyph panels along Hwy 24. In addition, the Scenic Drive will introduce you to the fascinating cultural and geological history of Capitol Reef National Park. The drive includes a portion of the original road through the Waterpocket Fold. The road passes through parts of the Fruita Historic District and follows the western faces of the Waterpocket Fold, and spur roads allow exploration into beautiful Grand Wash and Capitol Gorge. Check at the visitor center for a current schedule of interpretive programs, which may include geology talks, Fremont culture talks, evening programs, star gazing, moonwalks and geology hikes. Stop in at Ripple Rock Nature Center to experience interactive exhibits, games, activities and free educational programs. Wander through the historic Fruita orchards and pick fresh fruit when in season. The orchards contain approximately 3,100 trees including cherry, apricot, peach, pear, apple, plum, mulberry, almond and walnut. Discover Mormon pioneer history at the historic Gifford House store and museum.

    Natural Features

    The Fruita Campground area is located one mile south of the visitor center and is often described as an oasis within the desert. Fruita Campground is a semi-shaded, grassy campground and is located in the Fruita Historic District of the park.

    Nearby Attractions

    The Fruita campground is adjacent to the Fremont River and is a short walk from the group site, amphitheater, picnic areas, hiking trails, the historic Gifford house and orchards.

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (435) 425-3791.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $25 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Zion Canyon Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion Canyon Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion Canyon Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion Canyon Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion Canyon Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion Canyon Campground

    6.

    Zion Canyon Campground

    78 Reviews
    197 Photos
    835 Saves
    Springdale, Utah

    Zion Campground is a spacious piece of paradise that has been owned and operated by the Ferber family since 1973 when the adjoining Zion Canyon Campground and RV resort was founded by David Ferber. Our staff has explored the canyons and surrounding areas and can be quite helpful about where to go, what to wear and who to see for the outdoor adventure of a lifetime.

    After a long day come back to your site and freshen up for dinner with a choice of more than a dozen local eateries from casual to upscale all within a shuttle from our campground. After dinner sit outside and watch the sunset under The Watchman, a truly breathtaking sight.

    We only allow two pets in a site and they must be in an air-conditioned RV/Trailer. There are no pets allowed in tent sites or in sites in which the vehicle will not have air-conditioned being run all day.

    • Pets
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • RVs
    • Tents
    Camper-submitted photo from North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park

    7.

    North Campground — Bryce Canyon National Park

    74 Reviews
    244 Photos
    814 Saves
    Tropic, Utah

    Overview

    North Campground is located in the beautiful and unique Bryce Canyon National Park. Known for its colorful rock spires and grand vistas that sweep out over the High Plateaus region of the Colorado Plateau, Bryce Canyon is the ultimate camping destination. Located at an approximate elevation of 8,000 feet, the campground is centrally located within walking distance of the park's Visitor Center. Famed Sunrise and Sunset Points are located nearby, at the heart of the magnificent geologic wonder of Bryce Amphitheater, where hiking and photography opportunities are plentiful.

    Recreation

    Bryce Canyon offers several day-hiking trails, many of which are inter-connected. Single trails range from easy to strenuous, and from less than a mile in length up to 11 miles. The most popular hikes are combinations of two or three trails. Bryce Amphitheater has spectacular rock formations and sweeping views, providing excellent photography opportunities. The Bryce Canyon Shuttle, which runs from May to September, makes several stops throughout the park, giving visitors easy access to its most popular trailheads and viewpoints. Astronomers love visiting Bryce Canyon, where 7500 stars are visible on a moonless night. An annual Astronomy Festival is held in June, and astronomy and stargazing programs are offered on more than 100 nights throughout the year. Guided full moon hikes are also a fun way to experience the park at night.

    Facilities

    Bryce Canyon offers several day-hiking trails, many of which are inter-connected. Single trails range from easy to strenuous, and from less than a mile in length up to 11 miles. The most popular hikes are combinations of two or three trails. Bryce Amphitheater has spectacular rock formations and sweeping views, providing excellent photography opportunities. The Bryce Canyon Shuttle, which runs from May to September, makes several stops throughout the park, giving visitors easy access to its most popular trailheads and viewpoints. Astronomers love visiting Bryce Canyon, where 7500 stars are visible on a moonless night. An annual Astronomy Festival is held in June, and astronomy and stargazing programs are offered on more than 100 nights throughout the year. Guided full moon hikes are also a fun way to experience the park at night.

    Natural Features

    A ponderosa pine forest towers over North Campground offering equal parts sun and shade. The site is situated in a gently rolling landscape dotted with shrubs and summer wildflowers.

    Nearby Attractions

    The Colorado Plateau contains a multitude of awe-inspiring landscapes and Bryce Canyon lies very close to many of them, including Red Canyon, Kodachrome Basin State Park, Cedar Breaks National Monument, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Panguitch Lake, Boulder Mountain, Calf Creek Recreation Area, Capitol Reef National Park, Zion National Park and Grand Canyon National Park. Driving along Scenic Byway 12 is also a must-do for its red rock canyons and jaw-dropping views.

    Charges & Cancellations

    A customer who does not arrive at the campground and does not cancel the reservation by check-out time on the day after the scheduled arrival date may be canceled, assessed a $20 no-show fee and forfeit the night's fees for a campsite.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest
    Camper-submitted photo from Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest
    Camper-submitted photo from Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest
    Camper-submitted photo from Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest
    Camper-submitted photo from Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest
    Camper-submitted photo from Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest

    8.

    Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed - Dixie National Forest

    68 Reviews
    148 Photos
    1289 Saves
    Fern Ridge Lake, Utah

    Welcome to Tom Best Spring Road FR117 Dispersed Camping Area in the beautiful Dixie National Forest, Utah. This spot is a gem for those who love the freedom of dispersed camping. It's a no-frills, no-reservations-needed kind of place, perfect for those who enjoy a bit of solitude and a lot of nature.

    This area is just a stone's throw from Bryce Canyon, making it an ideal base camp for exploring the park. Visitors rave about the spacious sites and the stunning views. You can set up your tent or park your RV and enjoy the peace and quiet, with plenty of room to spread out. The campsites are well-spaced, so you won't feel like you're on top of your neighbors.

    One of the standout features here is that it's free to camp. You won't find amenities like toilets, showers, or drinking water, so come prepared. Fires are allowed, so you can enjoy a campfire under the stars, but you'll need to bring your own firewood. Pets are welcome, so feel free to bring your furry friends along for the adventure.

    The road leading in is in decent condition, and even big rigs can find a spot without much trouble. Some campers have mentioned that the area is big-rig friendly, and there's good cell service for T-Mobile, AT&T, and Verizon, which is a nice bonus if you need to stay connected.

    If you're into hiking, there's a nice little trail behind the campsites that offers a stunning view of Bryce Canyon. And for those who enjoy a bit of wildlife, you might spot some cows grazing in the nearby fields.

    In summary, Tom Best Spring Road FR117 offers a fantastic, no-cost camping experience with easy access to Bryce Canyon. It's a peaceful spot with plenty of space, great views, and the freedom to enjoy nature on your own terms. Just remember to pack in all your essentials, as amenities are minimal. Happy camping!

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion River Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion River Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion River Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion River Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion River Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Zion River Resort

    9.

    Zion River Resort

    66 Reviews
    124 Photos
    741 Saves
    Virgin, Utah

    Just minutes from Zion National Park, we are ideally located for easy access to several of the nation’s most beautiful parks. Zion River Resort is the perfect base camp for day trips to Bryce Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon North Rim, Cedar Breaks National Monument and many other of the Southwest's most popular destinations. Visit our Itineraries page for vacation adventure ideas and our Calendar to see the exciting events we offer throughout the year.

    For your comfort, each site has full hook-ups, a shade tree, fire ring (with the exception of 4 sites), picnic table, free Wi-Fi, and cable television. Pull thru sites are 60-70 feet long with a concrete pad and a grassy area perfect for relaxing on your lounge chair. Riverside Back-In sites average 40-50 feet deep, have gravel, and the Virgin River flowing behind them. There is a berm running along the river’s edge for the protection of our young guests; however, you can hear the river running all year. Standard Back-In sites range from 30-40 feet deep, have 30 amp electric, and are available with either a concrete pad & grass or gravel only. These sites are perfect for smaller RVs. Please help us maintain our desert grass by not putting down mats, rugs, or carpets. We will be happy to help you choose just the right site for your preferences and needs.

    Tent sites are located beside the Virgin River, have small pea gravel, a fire ring, picnic table, and electrical outlet. Potable water is located at either end of the tenting area. The camper kitchen is available for cooking and washing dishes. The restrooms, showers, and laundry are close to the tent area. All resort facilities are included.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground

    10.

    Ruby's Inn RV Park and Campground

    65 Reviews
    130 Photos
    606 Saves
    Fern Ridge Lake, Utah

    Open the end of March through October 30th! Check website for exact dates.

    We have 5 Cabins, 10 Tipis, 35 Reservable Tent Sites, 11 Group Sites, 11 Electric & Water Only Sites and 145 Full Hook-Up RV Sites ranging in size.

    The website has current rates based on your dates and people.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
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Pet-friendly camping in Utah

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Frequently Asked Questions

What camping is available in Utah?

According to TheDyrt.com, Utah offers a wide range of camping options, with 1490 campgrounds and RV parks in Utah and 496 free dispersed camping spots.

Which is the most popular campground in Utah?

According to TheDyrt.com, the most popular campground in Utah is Watchman Campground — Zion National Park with a 5-star rating from 229 reviews.

Where can I find free dispersed camping in Utah?

According to TheDyrt.com, there are 496 free dispersed camping spots in Utah.

What are the best parks in Utah?

According to TheDyrt.com, there are 11 parks in Utah that allow camping, notably Ashley National Forest and Arches National Park.