The best camping in
Texas

2380 Reviews2374 Campgrounds
Camping Texas

Nothing thrills the heart of a true explorer like the stunning diversity of outdoor adventure that awaits in the state of Texas! From the beauty of the Gulf Coast to the High Plains, Texas offers terrain that varies between mountains, woodlands, rolling hills, semi-arid plains and high desert. With more than 78 state parks and numerous wildlife areas, historic sites and natural attractions, Texas truly has something for everyone.

Insiders know that camping in Texas is much more than just hanging out around the campfire. In a state that boasts everything is bigger, natural features as well as wildlife areas are vast and rich, begging the weary traveler to indulge in all the sights and experiences this type of diversity provides. The variety of parks, campgrounds and backcountry offers the full range of adventure for those looking to ‘rough it’ all the way to those who choose to enjoy nature with a few more comforts.

South Central Texas is a prime area of the state to explore. Known far and wide as the Hill Country, it is so named for its rolling hills and woodlands. Famous for its excellent wineries, historic small towns and natural beauty, the Hill Country also boasts a unique offering for campers known as Enchanted Rock State Park.

Enchanted Rock is a large pink granite dome that rises 425 feet above the surrounding terrain and is the largest granite monadock in the United States. Indians, Spaniards and early settlers all had stories of magical, spiritual or unexplained happenings around the rock which gave the feature its name. These days, one of the most intriguing sights is at night, after a rain. The wet dome seems to glitter in the moonlight and while regarded as a simple play of light on the granite, the effect adds to both the mystery and enchantment of the area.

Another intriguing site in the Hill Country is Jacob’s Well, a short 78 miles southeast from Enchanted Rock State Park. Fed by a natural artesian spring, Jacob’s Well consists of a large pool connected to a vast underground cavern system that sprawls more than 4300 feet. The spring is connected to the Trinity Aquifer and emits thousands of gallons of water each day where visitors can enjoy the cool 68 degree water. Jacob’s Well is a popular and welcome retreat from the famous Texas heat!

Texas is the second largest state and for some, camping in Texas can, and does, turn into a life-long pursuit. With so many hidden gems, and areas to explore, it could take decades to experience it all. The Dyrt has you covered though! For the secret hideaways and must-see adventures in Texas, check back often to see the latest insider tips and places to explore!

EXPLORE
The Dyrt App

The #1 Camping App

Camp with confidence with the highest-ranked camping app for both iOS and Android. Search more than 500,000 listings, reviews, and tips for campsites across the U.S.

Enter your phone number to get the app.

The Dyrt App The #1 Camping App
Recent Reviews in Texas
Friendly and quiet - not on a busy highway

Beautiful facility. Small campground, maybe 20 sites. Most of them open with no shade, although we had some morning shade with ours.  Lovely lake and fishing and very friendly staff. The food at the restaurant is very reasonably priced and delicious. We camped at Matilda's Lakeside Store & RV Park in a travel trailer.

Lost Maples State Natural Area Primitive Campsite H

Lost Maples State Natural Area has some beautiful hiking trails and backpacking areas. If you need basic supplies you may find some at the general store in the small town nearby the park named Vanderpool. 

Perhaps the best time of the year to visit is in November when the weather is cool and the fall foliage take place. However, the park is very busy in November, so make a reservation six months in advance. If no campsites are available you may visit for the day and find a private campground nearby to camp.

There are basically two loops- an East Trail and a West Trail and each covers about 4-5 miles. It is completely possible to hike all the trails(about 12 miles) in a single day, but I prefer to hike and appreciate the natural features that can be found throughout the park.

This review is for the Primitive Area H on the West Trail.  The campsite is a primitive or dispersed site so there are no amenities. There is no water, no electricity, no restrooms, just natural space. Leave No Trace and Pack In Pack Out principles should be practiced. The camping area is adjacent to the West Trail and close to the West Loop Trail. There is a open field in one area and a tree covered space in another area. So there are options for both tent and hammock backpackers. 

This park has a number of peaks, creeks and ponds to view. In Texas State Parks fishing is allowed and no fishing license is required. Whether you're visiting to relax, fish or hike this park is enjoyable for all ages.

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area + The Cave

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area is an excellent park to visit for the day or to camp for a few days. It is family friendly with some easy trails, great views and lots of areas to scramble over rock surfaces.

Book a reservation for a day pass for an overnight stay at least a week in advance or it is very likely that there will be not space and you will be turned away at the gate. Yes, even day passes routinely sell out 3 to 4 days in advance.

Enchanted Rock is a huge monolithic granite rock. Most people simply hike up the rock along the main trail. If you take this route you simply follow the line of other hikers until you reach the top. However, if you are a little more adventurous I recommend hiking along the Echo Canyon Trail until you see the BIG ROCK, you'll know it when you see it, then cut through the brush and hike up the steep back side of the rock. You'll be rewarded with a more independent and secluded hike.

Of course the view from the top of the rock is great. You'll have a 360 degree view of the surrounding area. 

At the top of the rock venture toward the collection of boulders. You can scramble on top of the boulders, slide in between the boulders and if you can find the cave you can emerge yourself within the boulders. You can find the cave by asking someone or looking for the X. Once you find the X you will need to drop down the crevice about 8 feet to enter the depth of the cave. Once you drop down into the crevice you are pretty much committed, because it is a little difficult to exit the crevice. The cave stretches for about 100 yards and takes 30 to 40 minutes to pass through. I recommend that you only enter if you have a headlamp and you secure all of your valuables in a zipped pocket within a backpack. There are sections in the cave where if you drop your light, keys or phone you will not be able to retrieve them. Other than that, have fun walking, crawling and sliding through the cave.

There are walk up campsites on a big open field. On this occasion we stayed at the Moss Lake Primitive Campground. The campsite is nestled amongst a forest. There is plenty of shade and trees to hang a hammock. There are not facilities at this site, so Leave No Trace principles should be practiced.

Lost Maples State Natural Area Primitive Campsite A

Lost Maples State Natural Area has some beautiful hiking trails and backpacking areas. If you need supplies you may find some basics at the general store in the small town nearby the park named Vanderpool. 

There are basically two loops- an East Trail and a West Trail and each covers about 4-5 miles. It is completely possible to hike all the trails(about 12 miles) in a single day, but I prefer to hike and appreciate the natural features that can be found throughout the park. 

This review is for the Primitive Area A on the West Trail. I'd say that the hike to the campsite and away from the campsite is more scenic than the actual campsite. The campsite is a primitive or dispersed site so there are no amenities. There is no water, no electricity, no restrooms, just natural space. There is a latrine near the campsite. Leave No Trace and Pack In Pack Out principles should be practiced. There are openings amongst the brush for tents or a number of closely spaced trees for hammock backpackers. 

Perhaps the best time of the year to visit is in November when the weather is cool and the fall foliage take place. However, the park is very busy in November, so make a reservation at least six months in advance. It is possible to just visit the park to day hike the trails as well, but even then a reservation is advisable.

If no campsites are available you may camp at a nearby private campground and visit for the day.

Free boondocking (dry camping) beach

Located between Port Lavaca and Port O'connor, TX. A mile or so of no-fee camping. No designated sites. Hard packed sand/sea shell surface, with paved access roads. Beach is pretty clean but beach appropriate footware is required. There is a bath house with free lavatories. We were there in August 2019 and March 2020 and the inside showers (4) were locked. There is a free use outside shower. There are picnic tables covered with 4 open sided concrete shelters. There are trash barrels in front of all the shelters. The picinic shelter closest to the rest rooms is wheelchair accessable. No electric, sewer or water sites. This is a very windy place. If you tent camp, low profile strong tents are recommended. I've seen many RVs with generators, PV solar arrays and wind turbines. There are small convience stores and bait and tackle stores nearby. There is a fishing pier towards the Southern part of the beach. A few RV campgrounds in the area. It is kept pretty clean. In the warmer months the crabs like to hide in the bathrooms out of the sun. Don't be alarmed, they stay away from people. Don't miss the Camel memorial at the Southernmost entrance. There is a Geocache in the area.

Up and Coming!

This New Holiday Campground is really getting off the ground. Staff is amazing and very welcoming. They have great amenities and the campsites are great sized. Facilities are clean and nice upgrades. Laundry on site and machines work really well and its open 24/7. They have a camp store that is really great and well stocked. They are very dog friendly with a dog park and daily trash pick up at your site. The kids loved the pool and us parents enjoyed the hot tub.

Nice Escape from Covid-19

Everything is true as others have reviewed. Friendly and helpful staff. For RV site, some require at least a 50’ hose for water. Others are closer to the water. Electric is located close by sites. Some sites also have sewer. Nice place, I shall return one day.

Amazing state park

We were pleasantly surprised at the size of the RV spots in this state park. So much room!

Pros:

  • Large sites.
  • Lots of easy trails.
  • Plenty of recreational opportunities.

Cons:

  • If you miss the turn off to the 2nd loop of campsites, there is no place to turn around for miles.
  • The entrance road to campsite loop is really only 1.5 lanes wide, except at the turnoff. There is no shoulder.
Good place to stop

It pretty much rained almost the entire two days we were there. 😂

Pros:

  • All non-permanent sites are pull through. Still ended up unhooking our tow vehicle because we are almost 40’ long. zthry say they are big rig friendly, but we may have been put in whatever was available.
  • Nice picnic table.

Cons:

  • Local rock and dirt turns into a sludgy mud that we are still vacuuming out of our Jeep.
First to Review
Awsome

Clean, spacious and owner is awsome.