The best camping near
Big Bend National Park, TEXAS

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Camping Texas Big Bend National Park
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Most Recent Big Bend National Park Camping Reviews
Rocky road in but worth the drive

Robbers Roost can accommodate 2 vehicles and about 8 people. Nice views from this primitive site, especially the night sky, and there is very little traffic. Robbers Roast has a bear proof storage box. Unfortunately, there is no shade at the campsite.

Great views of the desert and rugged mountains. The South Rim is visible to the west. Elephant Tusk and Backbone Ridge are visible to the south.

A mile high and out of the way

Nice campsite with two pad locations each suitable for a 4 man tent complete with the obligatory 2ftx2ftx2ft bear box at around 5900 ft elevation. Trees provide shade.

Boulder Meadow Number #4 is the last in a cluster of 4 camps sites. I wouldn't hesitate to select it again. There is a BM #5 campsite little further up the Pinnacles Trail and before the Pinnacles Campsites.

As all Backcountry campsites at Big Bend it's a leave no trace and pack out your important papers location. Get your permit and reservation in person at the Backcountry office behind the Panther Junction Visitor Center.

The BM-4 campsite is a well marked two tenths of a mile off the Pinnacles Trail and 2.2 miles from the Chisos Basin Amphitheatre parking lot near the camp grounds there. The parking sits at an elevation around 5150 ft for an elevation change of 700 ft.

My crew went at it's typical 30min mile pace, but we stopped frequently for pictures and my 5th grade sons pack adjustments.

You could cut .5 miles at 150 ft of elevation change for some of your party if you drop them off at the parking loop for the visitors center.

Don’t go unless you want your vehicle scratched.

The road leading in is one of the worst in the park because it’s un maintained and very very narrow, I recommend taking the river road then heading north on black gap road to make it somewhat easier on your vehicle. There’s a decent trailhead by the camp and it’s pretty close to the old mercury mine in the park those are the only upsides.

Endless moos

The campsite is on top of a hill overlooking the brush near the river. It was really windy at night and throughout the night cows kept mooing. The only good thing about the site is it’s 15min of off-roading from the nearest paved road.

Very neat location.

Probably one of my favorite camp sites in big bend, was right on the river with plenty of wildlife to see. Saw a wild mare and her foal a few times which was pretty cool. The story of Johnson’s ranch is pretty cool too and while driving in you can see foundations of old buildings and a few marked graves here and there.

Pretty sketchy

When we first got to the camp site we realized just how remote it was. In the middle of the night a old beaten down sedan drove right up to our site and parked for a bit then drove off. Other than that is was a pretty good location.

Rancherias Spring Campsite on the Rancherias Loop

Rancherias Spring is a dispersed primitive campsite on the Rancherias Loop Trail. 

The main attraction of this site is the unique opportunity to walk through a cottonwood forest grove in the high mountain desert. There is not much water in this region, but there is apparently sufficient water to sustain a grove of trees. You also have the opportunity to cross over a high desert mesa. 

There are no facilities nor amenities at this campsite. Leave No Trace principles should apply. Purchase gas and supplies in Fort Stockton, Alpine or Terlingua before entering the park because there are no supplies within the park. Prior to visiting this site it is required that you check in to the Barton Warnock Visitor Center from 8am to 4pm and secure a backcountry permit. Sites must be at least 1/4 mile from any other existing campsite; at least 300 feet from water sources and prehistoric or historic cultural sites; at least 3/4 mile from trailheads or roads. 

At the trailhead and once you enter the trail, there is no cell phone signal. This is a remote area of the park which has few visitors, so take appropriate safety precautions for self-rescue if needed. 

This site is about 7 miles from the West trailhead entrance of the Rancherias Loop Trail. The spring itself was just a trickle when we visited. We were able to collect and filter water. Some in our group camped in the river wash. Others and I elected to camp up the hill on the rock surface. The surface on the hill was almost all rock, so instead of tent spikes I used large rocks to secure down my tent. 

The main attraction of this site is the unique opportunity to walk through a cottonwood forest grove in the high mountain desert. There is not much water in this region, but there is apparently sufficient water to sustain a grove of trees. You also have the opportunity to cross over a high desert mesa.

Casa Reza Farmhouse and Creek on the Rancherias Loop

Casa Reza Farmhouse is a dispersed primitive campsite on the Rancherias Loop Trail. 

The main attraction of this site is the ability to see a bit of pioneer history at the farmhouse. Also, having a perennial water source in this remote area is a nice luxury. You’ll also scamper over rock formations, through desert brush and around a myriad of desert flora. 

There are no facilities nor amenities at this campsite. Leave No Trace principles should apply. Purchase gas and supplies in Fort Stockton, Alpine or Terlingua before entering the park because there are no supplies within the park. Prior to visiting this site it is required that you check in to the Barton Warnock Visitor Center from 8am to 4pm and secure a backcountry permit. Sites must be at least 1/4 mile from any other existing campsite; at least 300 feet from water sources and prehistoric or historic cultural sites; at least 3/4 mile from trailheads or roads. 

At the trailhead and once you enter the trail, there is no cell phone signal. This is a remote area of the park which has few visitors, so take appropriate safety precautions for self-rescue if needed. This site is about 7 miles from the East trailhead entrance of the Rancherias Loop Trail. It is recommended and encouraged to not camp at the farmhouse site, but rather collect any needed water from the spring and walk further down the trail to camp. Reportedly this spring is a perennial water source. When we visited the water was freely running and we were able to collect and filter water easily. 

The main attraction of this site is the ability to see a bit of pioneer history at the farmhouse. Also, having a perennial water source in this remote area is a nice luxury. You’ll also scamper over rock formations, through desert brush and around a myriad of desert flora.

Seep Spring on the Rancherias Loop

Seep Spring is a dispersed primitive campsite on the Rancherias Loop Trail. 

The main attraction of this site is that it is relatively close to the trailhead entrance. Also, camping in the river wash on soft sand with high bluffs surrounding us was a fun experience. On route to this site you will pass through desert brush, see a variety of high mountain flora and weave your way through ocotillo forest. 

There are no facilities nor amenities at this campsite. Leave No Trace principles should apply. Purchase gas and supplies in Fort Stockton, Alpine or Terlingua before entering the park because there are no supplies within the park. Prior to visiting this site it is required that you check in to the Barton Warnock Visitor Center from 8am to 4pm and secure a backcountry permit. Backcountry sites are$10 per night with a limit of 6 people. Sites must be at least 1/4 mile from any other existing campsite; at least 300 feet from water sources and prehistoric or historic cultural sites; at least 3/4 mile from trailheads or roads. 

At the trailhead and once you enter the trail, there is no cell phone signal. This is a remote area of the park which has few visitors, so take appropriate safety precautions for self-rescue if needed. This site is about 4 miles from the East trailhead entrance for the Rancherias Loop Trail. Along the trail you will cross over mountains, valleys and river washes. During our trip there had not been rain and there was a forecast of zero rain. We elected to set up camp and sleep in the river wash on the sand. This is not advisable if there is rain or a forecast of rain because this area could flash flood. 

The main attraction of this site is that it is relatively close to the trailhead entrance. Also, camping in the river wash on soft sand with high bluffs surrounding us was a fun experience. On route to this site you will pass through desert brush, see a variety of high mountain flora and weave your way through ocotillo forest.

First to Review
Great location in Terlingua

We wanted to spend time in Big Bend, but also wanted to be able to have cell service for the work week.  This campground mostly rents out trailers, but they do have 2 RV spots.  We were lucky to get one of them!  The owners are really nice and the location is super convenient to check out the bars and restaurants of Terlingua.  We used this as our jumping off point for Big Bend explorations.  It was a bit of a drive into the park, but worth it to us to be able to have a solid work week with cell service.  We also enjoyed checking out downtown Terlingua.  There is a shower/bathroom here and it was kept really clean.  If we are ever back in the area we would absolutely stay here again!