the dyrt
THE BEST CAMPING IN
Oklahoma
502 Reviews 423 Campgrounds

There’s a reason Oklahomans are more likely to camp than the average American: Home to the country’s most diverse terrain mile-for-mile, Oklahoma comprises more than just the Great Plains. Camping in Oklahoma’s 10 distinct ecoregions–claiming four mountain ranges, sprawling forests, balmy swamps, 28 state parks, and more dam-created lakes than any other state—gives you access to more varied recreation opportunities within a short drive than you’ll find almost anywhere else.

You can’t go camping in Oklahoma without visiting Lake Texoma, the 12th-largest lake in the US. Spanning the southern Texas-Oklahoma border (hence the name), the biggest of the Sooner State’s 200-plus lakes provides more than 90,000 surface acres of water primed for sailing, kayaking, jet skiing, and especially fishing: Lake Texoma claims more than 70 species of fish, including Striped Bass impressive enough to make it the Striper Capital of the World. Make sure to pick up a fishing license!

Out of the water, Lake Texoma campers can observe migratory birds and wild hogs in two wildlife preserves, lead horses through 25 miles of equestrian trails, hike 14 miles along lakeside bluffs, and retire to one of more than 700 campsites. Plenty of showers, toilets, potable water points, and RV hookups mean campers have the option to sleep rugged or glamp easy.

When you’ve had your fill of sand and surf, travel to the opposite end of the state for Alabaster Caverns State Park. When an inland sea evaporated millions of years ago, it left behind a real gem: gypsum deposits that developed into some of the world’s largest crystal caves open to tours and wild caving. The biggest highlights of Alabaster Caverns State Park are a three-quarter-mile, 50-foot-tall main cavern, natural bridges, five species of bats, RV camping right near the caves, and best of all, the opportunity to camp in a cavern with a waterfall. For $40, you can rent the Water Cavern, which includes raised sleeping platforms and the option to sleep outside if need be.

Give everyone in your party easy access to the recreation of their choice by camping in Oklahoma only an hour or two from state capitol. Oklahoma City is smack-dab in the center of Oklahoma, making it easy to get a dose of nature without straying too far from nightlife in the state’s biggest metro area. Hike to 2,500 feet and rock climb routes in the storied Wichita Mountains, then explore all 12,500 acres of Lake Murray State Park—the state’s oldest and biggest state park.

Use The Dyrt, and finding all the best sites for adventuring and camping in Oklahoma will be a breeze.

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Recent Reviews in Oklahoma
Ski jump

We stayed at Ski Jump, which is right past Buzaards Roost. Small campground, tents only. Beautiful and quiet (minus a couple of geese who like to honk at each other.) vault toilets.

Nice and quiet.

We were here in early March. There was no water hook up but they did have 30 amp. Very quiet as we were the only ones there.

Large

This place was beautiful in spring

Beautiful, quiet, shade trees perfect location for visiting Fort Sill area

If you don't have a military ID you can stop at the visitor center and get a pass for your stay

Quiet and peaceful

It was great. I took my boys, 8 and 18 year old. Very quiet and felt secluded even though the campsites were about 75% full. Tent camped with electrical hook-ups which I wasn't expecting. I think it was only$14 a days. Went hiking the next day on the trails around the lake and mountain

this is amazing find. used to be a state park

new management of the park has lots of plans. cleaning this already great park, adding mountian bike trails to go along with the hiking trails. has a small fishing pond for kids, swimming pool open during summer months. when you drop down into this park you are in another world just beautiful and serene.

Update by OSU

I will complete this on my computer.

Very Nice

This is a very well maintained RV park. I think the pictures speak for them selves.

  • 32 Spacious Hookups
  • 22 - Drive-through
  • 10 - Back-in
  • Quaint Picnic Area 
  • Convenient On-site Laundry and General Store 
  • Shower/Rest Rooms Building
  • Rental Cabin
  • Free Wi-Fi 
  • Safe Storm Shelter 
  • Stocked Fishing Pond 

Located just minutes from Lake McMurtry, Lake Carl Blackwell, Karsten Creek Golf Course, Oklahoma State University, and all the rest that Stillwater has to offer, Cedar Crest is situated on 40 acres in a natural setting and offers modern amenities. Despite our country setting, we are easily accessible by paved roads.

Basic

This is an RV park that someone built next to their house, inside Stillwater city limits. I believe it did have a bathroom area, in the green and tan building. I didn't feel right getting out at this one it was right next to the house. This park did have electric, water and sewer. The place is pretty basic, I feel it would be good for out of town workers to stay.

Rustic

Love the creekside sites but watch out for raccoons. Large campground with 100+ sites but zero electric hookups. Dated bathrooms(same ones from 50 odd years ago). This is where I camped as a kid and it still draws me in. A bicycle trail runs along the creek towards little Niagara. 2-3 miles long. Love this campground.

Beautiful sites on the lake

Flat sites with beautiful views. Hook up’s too!

Never busy or loud

Never busy or loud when I've been there. Wish there were fish in the lake. Nice little swim beach. Perfect place to get away from the big city and see the sky.

Beautiful

Beautiful sunsets, quit and very clean. Two playgrounds and a clean bath/shower house. We love camping here.

Secluded & quiet

We stopped by on a weekday. Sights were off to the side from a communal parking lot. Trash & recycling collection. Some trash in the fire pits. It is a ways from gas so make sure you fill up before heading out

A Magical Place Tucked Away in Oklahoma

My dog, Ava, and I joined a group of fellow teardrop campers in a surprisingly unique and fascinating campground in Oklahoma. This campground, formally known as Red Rock Canyon State Park, has now become simply Red Rock Canyon Campground. The state park was slated for closure when a local family from the nearby town of Hinton negotiated to lease this lovely place from the state in order to keep this local gem open for both day use and camping.

WOW, what a great service they have done for camper travelers. After checking in at the friendly office, we found ourselves driving down a somewhat steep and winding road into the canyon. Now I'm pulling a 2300 pound teardrop, but plenty of big rigs have also made it down with no problems. The place really is enchanting. The tent sites are tucked right into the canyon walls, and full hook ups, while not tucked in are right inside the canyon as well. With kids in mind, there are many playgrounds as well as repelling and trails for adult types, but you must bring your own climbing equipment.

The one downside for me was the pay showers. It was 75 cents for a six minute shower, and change machines were right there, but hey, I want free showers.

Trout!

Nice scenery. Good fishing and kayaking. We went on a holiday and 4here was no rhyme or reason to the camping spots. Seemed very crowded with campers pitching tents wherever they can. I stilled enjoyed myself although it was crowded. The mini golf Definetly needs improving. And the info office is nice.

First to Review
Blast!

This campground was super cool because it was a little "out dated" but it made it cozy! So many beautiful trees and walking paths that it made the stay great. We would get up in the morning and do a short hike that was nearby, and then finish it off with one of the walking paths around the campground, then had breakfast. It was a great way to start the day. They offer RV sites as well as small cabins you can rent. My family and I took our RV, and had a blast. The sites were big enough for the RV and had a picnic table and fire ring within the site. We didn't feel like we were right on top of our neighbors either which was nice. There is a lake within walking distance, so we would head down there during the day. Dogs are allowed, but need to be on leashes. We brought our dog and he had a blast in the lake. They have a volleyball court set up as well as horse shoes which was fun! You can also rent stand up paddle boards from the front desk to take down to the lake. They also have a club house that has a pool table, although we didn't partake in this. There is an area where you can do laundry too, which we thought was pretty cool. This is definitely considered "glamping" to us :) There is also a boat launch if you need that too. We caught some really awesome weather while we stayed here which made the trip amazing! We will definitely be back.

Family friendly

Perfect place to camp. Very nice facilities.

Fine- Could Get Crowded in Summer

I stopped at Highway 9 Landing while driving from Taos, NM to Nashville, TN. Just a little ways off the highway it was a nice place to spend the night right on Oklahoma's biggest lake (at least the biggest that's entirely within the state of OK). Midweek in mid-October the campground was all but deserted. The only sounds I could hear were the roadway across the lake, birds, and lapping water.

In the off season the bathrooms were sort of clean-ish. Sites have picnic tables and grills and some have good flat spots for tents but I got the feeling that it was a campground more geared to RV and van camping.

There's a marina on one side of the campground and I can imagine that in the summer there's lots of activity on the lake making this a very lively campground. It was a fine campground just not my cup of tea. (Also the sunset was incredible)

RANGER REVIEW: VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG at Cold Springs Campground

Check Out The Campground: CLICK HERE

VIVO BareFoot: CLICK HERE

My Full Video Review Of The The VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG: CLICK HERE

Campground Review

Pulling into the Chickasaw National Recreation Area several camping options jump out just begging for you to choose them. I selected the Cold Springs Campground on this trip because its great location and access to the many falls of the area.

Along this turn out you can find many of the most popular stops for cool waters, hiking and natural beauty including most arguably the best stop to take a cool dip on a hot day, Little Niagara, a spring fed waterfall system which traverses some 2 mies downstream. With this being one of the first campgrounds in the area you are also just moments from the Chickasaw Cultural Center, a location which hosts many Native American educational events, stomp dance exhibitions and festivals for the community of Sulphur.

The campground has been partially modernized in comparison to other camps around the state, with a digital kiosk pay station as you enter camp, you can come any time, find a site and easily pay using any payment method. By far this surpasses the traditional honor box system which sometimes can be a bit tricky when you don’t bring exact change.

I found that campsites were large and welcoming when pulling into this camp. Big enough for RVs but ideal for tents, a variety of campers could call this space home with 65 campsites. In addition to this being the perfect site for individual campers, a group camp is located just a few hundred yards away for those needing a bit more.

The site I selected was right inside the opening loop, close to the restrooms, shaded in the rear from the road and with a large flat pad for my tent. The pad was constructed from small gravel and took little to no time to clear from fallen debris.

While the sites are dry camping, there are water spigots scattered throughout camp. Sites are equipped with a picnic table, fire ring with grill and lantern post, pretty typical of any government site, however these did look to be much more well maintained than others I have visited in the area. Restrooms at this site were well maintained and had nice flush toilets.

The only downside I found to the particular site I selected was its proximity to the gate itself and the influx of in and out traffic. Typically I would select something a bit further into the campground for privacy, but this site was so welcoming I went against my gut and with it. But for only $14 you could not beat the feeling this place offered with the woods engulfing your site and in the evening the deer roaming around ever so cautiously.

A few things to remember about this campsite:

  • Seasonally open from May through September.
  • Pets are welcome here but do require a leash at all times.

Rating:

I would give the Cold Spring Camp a 4 of 5 for its proximity, overall spaciousness and amenities. This site was only a short 5 minute drive from the Nature Center, had access to many hiking trails in the area and was secluded from the major highway just enough to make it feel much further away from town than it actually was.

Product Review

  • Name: VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG
  • Retail Price: $150.00
  • Size: 7.5
  • Color: Olive

As a Ranger for the Dyrt, I am sent items to test from time to time to give real feed back about how these items work within my active lifestyle. On this trip I was closing out my review cycle for the VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG shoes. These shoes are a part of the vast line of minimalist shoes VIVO Barefoot has released utilizing recycled bottles and other materials to keep in line with a Vegan outlook. The shoes are the “soft ground” version of their outdoor line, designed to grip comfortably the ground below you and provide both support and traction when running, hiking or simply walking.

Shipping:

I placed my order for these shoes and within 5 days they arrived at my home. Shipping for the package arrived in a VIVO red reinforced bag with bold branding on the outside. Inside the box was a hefty box containing materials about the shoe, shipping receipt, 1 pair of shoe laces, 2 insoles and the shoes neatly wrapped in branded tissue paper.

Field Testing:

I tested these shoes over 5 different wears over two weeks of doing typical things I do in my day to day life. With my stop at Cold Springs I put them to the final test, navigating on slippery rocks as I traversed the many waterfalls in the area, trekking through boggy wet grounds as I visited the neighboring Fall Festival at the Chickasaw Cultural Center, climbing on steep gravel banks and walking on various types of surface. I can only say that the shoes never seemed to miss a beat or make me feel the slightest bit uneasy in my footing.

For someone like myself, finding a shoe which suits my lifestyle is multi-fold. I have had issues with chronic sciatica over the years which has nearly grounded me from travel multiple times, my joints tend to build pressure and pop often and over time and though playing sports as a child I just wasn’t the most friendly to my body as I could be. I had seen information about minimalist shoes helping retrain your step and get your body more in line with its natural feel by extending the muscles you typically are shrinking wearing highly padded shoes, by allowing your toes to rest more naturally and less hindered while in the shoes and by allowing your joints to naturally cushion your walk. I didn’t know what exactly to expect from the shoes and was not expecting a miracle, but I was curious I will say.

Over the first 4 wears I noticed that taking the shoes off I did not experience the same pain after long days that I typically would in a standard pair of running shoes. Pain is perhaps a strong word, discomfort would be more appropriate. Instead I simply felt like I had removed the shoes. I know that sounds strange but considering I didn’t even know I had an issue it was a strange feeling indeed when I had the ah ha moment. Not only that I noticed following removal, typically I stand and stretch and hear my joint popping, however with the VIVO Barefoot shoes I didn’t have the tension release.

With these I can walk around feeling the ground below me in a comfortable way. On stones and uneven surfaces I feel like I can grip better with my feet to secure my balance and though they are taking a little adjustment I am really enjoying the overall feel of the shoes.

Pros:

  • Water resistant - When I was walking on the rocks and around the waters edge at Cold Springs, I noticed that while I could feel the water, I didn’t feel like it was sloshing inside my shoes. They are water resistant, and while that does not mean I could fully submerge my foot I felt with the hiking around the rocks I was safe.
  • Flexible - When you get this shoe you are inclined to test the shoes flexibility considering it is made from recycled plastic bottles, something I feel is much more rigid by nature than what I feel my shoe should be. They completely roll up end to end! Any shoe that will do that is a shoe I know will move and grip in any direction I am moving for sure.
  • Tight Ankle - It was great for keeping debris out of my shoe and assisted in my shoe not slipping on my foot when I was wearing it throughout the day or competing with my sock.

Cons:

  • Tight Ankle - It was very difficult to get onto my foot because it was not stretchy enough to easily slip on. Over time I know it will loosen a bit, but that by far is the worst thing about the shoe in my opinion.
  • With or without insoles - Inside the box an insert insole is provided, to get the full barefoot experience you can opt to not use these or you can use them for a bit of cushion. I was a bit conflicted by the choice. Without the insoles the shoe slips on much easier but it also is a bit more of a rough ride feel when getting used to them.

Rating:

Of 5 stars I would give the VIVO Barefoot Primus 4 stars. I love the shoes but the process of putting them on being so difficult (almost 10 minutes the first time I put them on). I feel like it will continue to take some warming up to them to really know how I like that aspect. I have found that when using them to workout that tight ankle does make a small red impression on the top of my foot and while my feet themselves do not hurt, in the long run I would not want the to be the continued outcome. I will continue wearing them and testing them and I assume this will pass.

Nice Campsite On Busy Boating Area

Of the campgrounds around the water, this one is perhaps one of the more busy. When visiting we noted numerous boat trailers just waiting for their owners to return to them. Despite it being so busy it was pretty quiet as a whole. Lots of trees around this location make for plenty of shade during warmer months and sites are large enough to easily accommodate rigs of all sizes or tent campers.

Sites are well priced at $14 which wasn't bad considering how the campground was set up. Despite it being a primitive camp and only having vault toilets it was surprisingly comfortable feeling and does have water spigots around. It is also one of the smaller campgrounds at the Lake of the Arbuckles so during summer it can fill up quickly.

The site I checked out here had a picnic table and fire ring and was fairly even. There was a nice grassy pad which was ideal for tent camping like I enjoy.

I lot of people, as I mentioned before, take advantage of the lake from this campsite area so it is pretty noisy during the day at some of the sites and getting in the water can be a bit hard when its super busy because the boats really kick up the waves and there is no designated swimming area, however a bit further away it wasn't to bad. Nighttime, pretty quiet.

TIPS:

  • These sites are not reservable so it is first come first serve. Arrive early during busy times of year to ensure your space.

  • If you have a boat, make sure your registrations are cleared by the State of Oklahoma before entering the water, this site is a very active site for game wardens to inspect so if you are hauling anything which does not fit guidelines to the water, you might want to reconsider doing so here.

Huge Campground With Group Camping

My first impression of this campground was a little fear…. but let me explain….

When I pulled into this campground it looked like a festival had set up shop right inside the gate with dozens of tents in a clearing. It was a little overwhelming and I was afraid that with the closure of one of the local camps, I felt the overflow had come mostly to this camp and that it was not going to have an ounce of privacy.

But… turns out that it was just a Boy Scout group in the group camp which is positioned right inside the gate. So my fear of overcrowding subsided and as I traveled a bit deeper into camp I noticed it wasn't to bad, in fact there were tons of places because this campground has over 100 sites, spread over several loops. This gave me not only a great confidence that I could find something perfect, but also something removed from the sounds of the populated group camp and enjoy a little time away from it all.

Sites at this camp vary, there are both pull through and back in sites. The strange however, was that online on Receation.gov (where you typically book any sites located on government lands) this campground is known only to be a "group camp". However clearly there are individual sites, and you can access these through the kiosk just inside camp.

The site I selected had a strange configuration for parking, you park beside the spot, but in a large truck it seemed to be a bit in the way of the road, in my car it would have by far been a bit better fit. I was positioned on a corner which meant I had a lot of space and my campsite had both a picnic table and fire ring with attached grill in addition to the lantern post. Overall minus the parking the site was pretty ideal with big shade trees and a pretty even place to set up a tent.

I did notice around camp not all sites are created equally, while my site had a nice even space not he table top some of the sites still were utilizing the older tables which were warped from weather.

TIPS:

  • If you aren't a group wait til you get here to select a site because online there doesn't seem to be a good reservation system for regular campers.

  • If you are a rig which uses solar, the sites on the furthest loops might be a better fit, the first loop of camp is pretty tree covered.

Loop C & D Large & Spacious

When I went to check out this area it was mid-October and the campground was limited to only the loops C & D while the A & B, the first you see when you arrive were barricaded for the season. While I did see a few rogue campers who had parked at the entrance and hiked into these spaces, I chose to go ahead and explore the actual open spaces.

Pulling into the second loop of camping, you first arrive at Loop C, just before the pay station this area has a clearly posted sign that you need a reservation to stay here when you enter. I could see why when traveling through the loop, it was a pretty day and the spaces all seemed full with the exception of one. Toward the end of the loop, the road narrowed and made any passing impossible. Some of the spaces were pretty close to the water line toward the end and one even seemed to be a floating island all its own.

Spaces were open for both tents and RVs in this area for between $16 and $24 a night depending on the amenities you are looking for. All of the spots I looked at on loop C were $24 and had full electric and water in addition to their nice even pads, large paved drives, lantern hooks an both picnic tables and grills. I did notice on the map however there were a few scattered smaller sites without electricity.

The nice thing about the sites on Loop C were that they seemed large, especially toward the beginning and end of the loop, while these were not waterfront they were within yards of the water front and backed up to the wooded areas which made for a quieter evening and also for more space in the sites themselves.

TIPS:

  • Book in advance if you are wanting to stay at this campground, you will have a full listing of all sites and be able to chose from your amenities you are looking for. In addition, you will be able to assure you will have a space at the campground. For those not able to do so, try Loop D during fall and winter.

  • Beware of snakes in brush near shoreline and raccoons which often can be spotted trying to pillage through camp. Make sure you take precautions to keep animals from your camp by storing food inside vehicles when not in use and utilize dumpsters near camp instead of leaving trash near camp.

  • Cell phone coverage might be spotty in this area. Though with AT&T I had good coverage reports from other providers have netted a less desirable signal.

Cramped Quarters

This place is to close for comfort. When we visited and drive through it was a busy weekend to say the least.

Checking out the three campgrounds on this turn off this one was the least appealing. Why? It looked like every spot was occupied by RVs that were large and accommodating large families. Ok so that in itself isn’t bad, but what was bad is each of those families seemed to have multiple vehicles cramming into camp, parking on the narrow roadway and littering the space.

I would compare the cramped feeling of this campground to being in an apartment where your neighbors are right on top of you versus a subdivision like Elephant Rock (neighboring camp) which has spacing between sites which do not feel cram-packed.

The camp ground itself had decent restrooms and paths to them which cut through the camp, but I would not imagine this to be a comfortable camp ground if you wanted something a bit more removed or secluded. This would never be a recommendation for someone who enjoys camping in a more removed setting or in a tent, simply to much in and out traffic.

I felt like also, this camp had to many loose children running through campsites, while I do enjoy a good family campground, there simply wasn't enough space for them to do so without being in someone else camp space, taking even further away from the seclusion feeling I enjoy when camping.

There was a playground before you enter camp and there were several people there, this would be ideal for families camping, however many did not seem to be taking advantage of the large spacious area.

TIPS:

  • Even if you reserve a space arrive early. With this camp filling up the way it tends to navigating can be difficult and would become more and more so the more filled it becomes. If you are attempting to drive through with an RV later in the evening you could easily become frustrated trying to get around those parked on the road.
  • This area has some amazing trees for hammocks so if you enjoy spending time kicking back you will enjoy stringing up your hammock and taking in some of the views of the waterline.
Large Open Tent Camping

On this turn out of the Lake there are three campgrounds, this being the most Tent friendly of the three. There are spaces equipped with electrical connections or primitive sites in an open area which are comparable for tents. Both of these sites allow a wide open feel close to the shore line with plenty of room to move around comfortably.

After entering Tipp’s point you first find the day use pavilion and vault toilets. Just beyond that on the left is parking for the open tent area which has scattered grills and a couple of community picnic tables set in the open area. This is ideal for groups that are larger or just the person who wants to dry camp.

to the right are a group of non-primitive sites for RVs and tents. While these are closer together they are not as cluttered feeling as the sites at both the cover or elephant rock. Beyond this point are more RV sites, a shower house and playground.

This campground when I visited was the least used of the three on this turn out. While there were probably a dozen or so campers in the firSt part of the section if was very wide open feeling. The water levels were pretty high and had encroached upon some of the sites near the shower house while higher level sites remained safe.

TIPS:

  • If staying in this section in the open camping tent area you might want to bring a fold out table. There are only a couple in this area for group use and to eliminate having to share better safe than sorry.
  • Bring shower shoes. this should be a given but the showers here aren’t terrible but aren’t something you would want to be barefoot in
Accessible, family-pet friendly site.

We camped with friends, campsite was very roomy with plenty of space for the pups and kiddos. We even brought our own disc basket and had plenty of space to play. The grounds were clean, well kept, restrooms were clean. While the park is relatively small, it is very family friendly with a nice playground,swimming pool. There is a rock climbing area that looks to be a great place for beginners. Everything was walkable. Nice trails that people of all ages and abilities were using. I wish there had been another trail that was longer, I wouldn’t recommend for serious hikers. It’s just about an hour drive from OKC which means we will be back for another quick weekend getaway.

Great site. Great park. We will be back

We found a nice secluded tent site, despite it being fall break weekend. There are many campgrounds at Lake Murray to choose from. We chose this site which was conveniently located near a nature trail with a beautiful lookout point, as well as a hiking trail. Did not use the restroom facilities, but judging from the nature center, lodge and other park facilities I am sure they were nice. The recently built lodge is beautiful. The staff we met were friendly and helpful. Seems like a very nice and well rounded park even if you aren’t planning any lake or water activities. dog friendly. We will be back!

Pretty, FREE park

What’s better than parking overnight at a gorgeous lake? Parking there for FREE with an electric hookup. Plus the town has a great Route 66/Old Town Museum for cheap too! A great find!

There's a lot to do in the area

You have a lot of options for activities - hiking, swimming, boating, fishing. There's a lot of resources near by so you never run out of anything. My only complaint is that it's normally pretty crowded.

Quiet Lake Views

Though still open for the season this campground looks a little forgotten with few campers, overgrown sites and subpar restrooms. Buy the views from these sites at dusk are u paralleled by other sites on the lake.

Sites here are pretty standard with a picnic table, grill and prep station. The road is narrow and though you could navigate an RV here I would not recommend a longer unit.

I found this site to be less improved than Kiowa and less used, however their day use area was nicer with large picnic shelters which can be reserved and include electricity.

The site I selected was waterfront but high enough above the waterline that I would not fear lake waters rising and flooding my space. I was able to easily pull into my site in my small car. The views from this area are uncorrupted by structures and trees and you can clearly see much of the lake, making for beautiful sunsets.

The restrooms at this location were mere pit toilets and it looked as though these hadn’t been maintained in a while. One door was ajar on the men’s restroom midcamp and there were no sinks only non potable water on a spigot outside the restroom.