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Places to Camp in Georgia

4,166 Reviews

With 63 state parks and historic sites, from the Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic sea islands, more and more adventurers are picking Georgia for their outdoor expeditions. Anchored by the mass metropolis of Atlanta on the north end, and graced by the Southern charm of Savannah in the south, Georgia offers plenty of adventure in between, with some of the highest peaks, prettiest waterfalls, and the best shelling in the South. Grab your tent, your best broken-in boots, or the car-camping accoutrements – camping in Georgia is waiting for you!

The Chattahoochee Forest is a popular camping destination, but it can be hard to escape the hustle and bustle, especially at the Chattooga and Blue Ridge recreation areas. Luckily Three Forks Campground at the Appalachian Trail offers an escape from the hubbub of more popular sites. Enjoy multiple waterfalls, trout streams, and gnarled trees, all in an old-growth forest. There’s also access to several trails – the perfect home base to get some serious day hiking done.

Enamored by all of your options for camping in Georgia? We are too! With its stunning biodiversity (home to the greatest concentration of salamander species in the world), lush forests, and verdant bottomlands, it’s well-worth a trip. For a great taste of the beauty, try the Bear Creek Trail, with its adjacent campground. Winding through a beautiful stream valley, this trek takes you past the second-largest tree in Georgia, burbling waterfalls, and plenty of wildflowers for your 5.7 mile round-trip hike.

But if you’re looking for something different than the Chattahoochee area, check out the Silver Comet Trail, a short jaunt north of Atlanta – perfect for weekend warriors eager to get out into nature. Free and paved, at just over 61 miles long, the Silver Comet trail is built on abandoned rail lines. The path winds through residential areas and forests alike, where you’ll find everything from tunnels to trestles, bike rental shops to wheelchair access points. Find camping in Georgia along the way and get as close to the natural beauty as possible.

Whichever route you choose - mountains or flatlands, waterfalls or sea - you can be sure to find some of the best camping in Georgia off the beaten trail with The Dyrt!

Best Camping Sites in Georgia (832)

  1. Camper-submitted photo from Cloudland Canyon State Park Campground

    1.

    Cloudland Canyon State Park Campground

    122 Reviews
    630 Photos
    895 Saves
    Trenton, Georgia

    Resting on the western edge of northwest Georgia’s Lookout Mountain, Cloudland Canyon State Park is more than 3,000 acres—one of the state’s largest parks—of rugged geology, and offers visitors hiking, camping, rock climbing and more along the park’s most iconic feature: the deep gorge cut through the mountain (elevation varies from 800 to more than 1,800 feet!) by the Sitton Gulch Creek. Multiple waterfalls and cascades, including the uber-popular Hemlock Falls, can be found throughout the gorge, making this park feel like a hidden gem around Lookout Mountain.

    Staring at the geographic anomaly isn’t the only thing to do at this park, however. Beyond the countless miles of hiking, biking and horse riding trails, geology fanatics can find rock climbing, rappelling and spelunking across the park—cave tours are even offered for beginning cave explorers at Sitton’s Cave.

    The park holds a massive variety of camping options, including 72 spots suitable for both tent and RV campers, 30 walk-in sites, 13 dispersed sites, 16 cottages and 10 yurts, each in a different area of the park. With this many options, campers can find seclusion all around.

    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • RVs
    • Cabins

    $65 / night

  2. Camper-submitted photo from Skidaway Island State Park Campground

    2.

    Skidaway Island State Park Campground

    97 Reviews
    369 Photos
    878 Saves
    Savannah, Georgia

    As part of Georgia’s Intracoastal Waterway, Skidaway Island State Park is nearly 600 acres of maritime forest, tidal creeks, and salt marshes nestled between the Skidaway River and the housing developments of The Landing. The park’s main draw is its lush coastal woods of live oaks, red cedars, and pines dripping with Spanish moss, which, in turn, is home for a variety of wildlife, including deer, raccoons and a variety of shorebirds. Many of the park’s flora and fauna can be seen on a network of 6 miles of walking trails and boardwalks. Some trails are ADA accessible, and some are also open to cyclists. For your best chance at spying a resident alligator, go for a stroll on the 2-mile Big Ferry Trail.

    Visitors to Skidaway Island State Park, just a 10-mile drive southeast of Savannah, have access to nearly 90 tent and RV campsites, in addition to 3 camper cabins and 3 group campsites. All sites offer electrical hookups, and some are ADA accessible. Campground amenities include restrooms with showers, bike rentals, picnic areas, two playgrounds, laundry facilities, and an interpretive center. There is also an amphitheater that hosts seasonal interpretive programs. A hiking trail from the campground leads to an observation tower that overlooks the Skidaway Narrows, where you can scan for egrets and osprey. If you’re lucky, you might spot dolphins swimming up the waterway. Campsite rates range from $40–$49/night; cabins range from $42–$140/night.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $40 - $49 / night

  3. Camper-submitted photo from Stone Mountain Park Campground

    3.

    Stone Mountain Park Campground

    87 Reviews
    259 Photos
    379 Saves
    Stone Mountain, Georgia

    Nestled among 3200 acres of natural beauty just outside of Atlanta, the Stone Mountain Park Campground features over 400 RV, Pop-up, and Tent sites as well as Yurt, Safari Tent, and RV Rentals. While Stone Mountain GA camping you'll also find a variety of recreational activities and family-friendly attractions and events available seasonally.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $44 - $65 / night

  4. Camper-submitted photo from High Falls State Park Campground

    4.

    High Falls State Park Campground

    72 Reviews
    327 Photos
    232 Saves
    Jackson, Georgia

    Located Northwest of Macon and great for camping near Atlanta, High Falls State Park is named for tumbling cascades on the Towaliga River. Boat rental, ramps and fishing docks provide easy access to the park’s lake, known as one of Georgia’s top fishing spots for hybrid and white bass. Overnight visitors can choose from a spacious campground or lakeside yurts, which are like canvas and wood tents. Each yurt features a small deck, picnic table and grill outside, plus furniture, electrical outlets and a ceiling fan inside. During summer, guests may cool off in the park’s swimming pool.

    Visitors can hike along the river’s edge and through hilly forest to the remains of a hydroelectric power plant foundation. In the early 1800s, this area was a prosperous industrial town with several stores, a grist mill, cotton gin, blacksmith shop, shoe factory and hotel. High Falls fell from prosperity in the 1880s when a major railroad bypassed it. Today, the park is a popular camping destination and a relaxing side trip for travelers on I-75.

    Reservations, Accommodations & Facilities:

    -1,050 Acres

    -650 Acre Lake

    -6 Yurts

    -106 Tent, Trailer & RV Campsites, some seasonal

    -1 Pioneer Campground

    -1 Paddle-In Primitive Campsite (sleeps 25)

    -1 Group Shelter (seats 125)

    -5 Picnic Shelters

    -River Pavilion — for campground guests only

    -Swimming Pool (fee) — seasonal

    -2 Boat Ramps

    -Playgrounds (Note: the playground in the River Campground B Loop has been removed)

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $41 - $85 / night

  5. Camper-submitted photo from Red Top Mountain State Park Campground

    5.

    Red Top Mountain State Park Campground

    72 Reviews
    262 Photos
    399 Saves
    Emerson, Georgia

    This popular park on Lake Allatoona is ideal for swimming, water skiing and fishing. Visitors can bring their own boats or rent from nearby marinas. A sand swimming beach is nestled in a cove and surrounded by trees, providing a great place to cool off during summer. Picnic shelters and group shelters may be rented for meetings, parties, reunions and other celebrations. Guests often stay overnight in rental cottages, a spacious campground, or the park’s lakeside yurt. While best known for the 12,000 acre lake, Red Top Mountain is also a hiker’s haven. More than 15 miles of trails wind through the forested park, providing opportunities for exercise and nature photography. A short, paved trail behind the park office is suitable for wheelchairs and strollers, welcoming guests to explore a reconstructed 1860s homestead. The gravel-topped 4 mile Iron Hill Trail is open to both hikers and bikers, offering pretty views of the lake’s shoreline. Named for the soil’s rich red color caused by high iron-ore content, Red Top Mountain was once an important mining area. Iron pour programs are occasionally held near the Vaughn Cabin behind the park office. The park also maintains Allatoona Pass Battlefield, a historically significant battlefield due to the well-preserved trenches and earthworks.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  6. Camper-submitted photo from Mistletoe State Park Campground

    6.

    Mistletoe State Park Campground

    65 Reviews
    348 Photos
    217 Saves
    J. Strom Thurmond Lake, Georgia

    This recreation area is part of J. Strom Thurmond Lake

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  7. Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground

    7.

    Vogel State Park Campground

    64 Reviews
    292 Photos
    560 Saves
    Suches, Georgia

    Established in 1931, Vogel State Park stands today as one of Georgia’s oldest state parks. Over 223 acres of land make up this beautiful reserve, known for its extensive selection of trails and crisp, brightly colored forests. Located at the base of Blood Mountain in the heart of the Chattahoochee National Forest, Vogel is especially popular during the fall thanks to the blanket of colors that transform the park’s trees and wildlife. In fact, Red, yellow, and gold leaves cover the landscape of the surrounding hills, mountains, and valleys for months at a time.

    This park is also full of history, with many facilities being constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. To learn about the “CCC” boys and their incredible story, check out the park museum open seasonally.

    The North Georgia Mountains around Vogel were also linked to native tribes for generations before European settlement, and the adventurous individual can still find remnants from their time on this land via the surrounding trails. In fact, there are a variety of trails available, including the 4 mile Bear Hair Gap loop. Bear Hair is easier than other hikes in the area and leads to the Trahlyta Falls, a peaceful set of waterfalls perfect for photo opportunities or a small picnic. More seasoned hikers can undergo the challenging 13-mile Coosa Backcountry Trail, which showcases the regional wildlife and various water features throughout.

    If hiking isn’t your thing, the park’s 22 acre lake is open to non-motorized boats, and during summer, visitors can cool off at the mountain-view beach. Enjoy paddleboarding or kayaking while your family watches you from shore, then finish up with a round of mini golf at the park’s 18 hole course.

    For overnight accommodations, 34 Cottages, 85 campsites and 18 primitive backpacking sites are all available for a reasonable rate.There is also a pioneer campground available for rent, which is perfect for groups and allows campers to see how past settlers would have lived. During your stay, there are 4 picnic shelters available for use, as well as a group shelter and a lake pavilion, which seat 90 and 100 guests respectively. There is also a general store open year round, with Wifi open at the visitor center.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $30 - $250 / night

  8. Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground

    8.

    Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground

    66 Reviews
    311 Photos
    475 Saves
    Tallulah Falls, Georgia

    Tallulah Gorge State Park is designated one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia and is a great place for camping near Atlanta. Tallulah Gorge is a 2-mile-long, 1000-foot-deep canyon of metamorphic rock, where the Tallulah River tumbles over six dramatic waterfalls. This unique ecosystem is also the home to several endangered plant species, including the persistent trillium. These natural features have drawn visitors to the gorge since the early 1800s, and with the construction of the Tallulah Falls Railway in 1882, it became Georgia’s first official tourist attraction. Now the gorge is a hotspot for outdoor activity, ranging from hiking, fishing and swimming, to more adventurous pursuits, such as rock climbing and whitewater paddling.

    The best way to explore Tallulah Gorge is to camp at Tallulah Gorge State Park. Located 100 miles northeast of Atlanta, this 2700-acre park provides 50 tent and RV sites (two are ADA-accessible) on the rim of the raging river gorge. The park also has one group site, and three hike-in backcountry sites. Campsites in the park are fairly compact and close together, so don’t expect a lot of seclusion. Campground amenities include flush toilets, showers, laundry facilities and a dump station. There are also two playgrounds for the kids, picnic areas, an interpretive center, and access to a sandy beach on Tallulah Falls Lake.

    The main draw to Tallulah Gorge is hiking down to Sliding Rock at the bottom of the gorge. The park only issues 100 permits per day for this hike in order to minimize impact and maintain the canyon’s natural character. These permits are given on a first-come, first-serve basis, and cannot be reserved in advance—so get yours early! Without a permit, there are many more trails to hike along the rim of the gorge, with each offering stunning viewpoints. Don’t miss the suspension bridge on the Hurricane Falls Trail, which provides a spectacular river view from 80 feet directly above the churning waterfall.

    FUN FACT: Tallulah Gorge was used as a filming location for Marvel’s Infinity War. Eagle-eyed fans may recognize Hurricane Falls in the final battle in Wakanda.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  9. Camper-submitted photo from River's End Campground & RV Park

    9.

    River's End Campground & RV Park

    57 Reviews
    135 Photos
    695 Saves
    Tybee Island, Georgia

    Tybee Island, often referred to as Savannah’s Beach, offers visitors a place for all seasons with sandy beaches, great fishing, and rich history at every turn.

    River’s End Campground is a fantastic home base for exploring it all. We’re just a few short blocks from the beach (approx. 1/2 mile) and an easy 15 mile drive to historic downtown Savannah.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  10. Camper-submitted photo from Amicalola Falls State Park Camping

Pet-friendly camping in Georgia

Recent Reviews In Georgia

4166 Reviews of 832 Georgia Campgrounds