The best camping near
Berry, ALABAMA

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Beautiful

Lake Lurleen is a beautiful, well kept place to camp. Bathrooms are exceptionally clean. The camp sites are big and well maintained. The only draw back was if you are camped at the bottom and have to do the hill climb in the dark to the rest room.

Pretty good

We got a tent site with power. Great price! Clean park, lake is always a good thing. Lights at camp ground kinda bright, but guess if I needed to go pee that would help lol. Lady working office was pretty nice and helpful. Has a little store can get almost anything you might need. Bath house shower had great hot water with good pressure. Felt safe here that’s important. I’d definitely come back. Probably next weekend lol the beach area had a lot of rocks! Probably due to water level low had to go buy some water shoes, but then it was all good.

Pretty trail, Lots of primitive campsites

The entire Sipsey Wilderness is gorgeous, but if you want a trail with lots of great spots to camp, this trail is fantastic. Don't expect bathrooms or drinking water to be nearby, but if you're looking to really get away from it all and do some primitive camping, this is a great place to go. You'll find fire pits at most of the sites that previous campers have made, but that's about it. Most of the time, except during dry spells, there are LOTS of waterfalls. Also lots of shallow places for the kids to play in the water. Watch for snakes and bring bug spray. If you want a good campground in Bankhead National Forest near Sipsey that is more modern with a bathhouse, picnic tables, etc, try Brushy Lake. But this trail is perfect for primitive camping.

Beautiful, One of a Kind Place

My family has been going to Dismals Canyon since I was a child, and my mother's parents took her when she was a child. Now I take my children. The reason we return year after year is that it is absolutely gorgeous, and is one of the few places in the world where you can see the tiny glow worms called Dismalites. When you first arrive, you go down to the little general store that now has a cafe. I have not eaten at the cafe, so I can't attest to the quality of the food, but I can say everyone who has worked there has always been very friendly and knowledgeable about the canyon. Here you will pay for your campsite and/or your canyon access. Day tours are self guided, but the night tours to see the dismalites are guided. The campground is relatively expensive, for our area anyway, but it is very clean and beautiful, and each campsite we have visited has been very private. There is a nice bathhouse for campers. Each campsite also provides garbage cans and a fire pit. They DO NOT let you bring in firewood, but you can get firewood there. Also you cannot park right next to your site, you will have to park in the parking area and walk to your site. All of their rules are very strict, but they do so to preserve the park in a clean, natural state. There is a nice fairly deep reservoir to swim in, as well as creeks and streams throughout. Also waterfalls, giant trees, and many neat rock structures. The trail through the canyon is not terribly difficult. I hiked it with my 2 year old strapped to my back the last time we went, and my 62 year old mother and 5 year old in tow. The hardest part is really the long stairs going into and out of the canyon. The cost is really the only reason I gave this 4 stars instead of 5. Bring bug spray.

We'll Be Back!

Corinth Recreation Area– USFS 

Corinth Recreation area is located near the town of Double Springs, Alabama. The area is operated and maintained by the United State Forest Service (USFS) and can be reserved through www.recreation.gov. There are 52 total sites here and most reserved on line, there are a few sites only available as walk ins. This area is very clean and really quiet at night, the campgrounds are near the lakes edge but not lakeside. The sites are very well maintained, paved and gravel with full services including sewer. There are two RV campgrounds, Firefly and Yellowhammer. We stayed at Yellowhammer as this had more shaded sites than Firefly. There’s also a few tent only sites between the two loops. The bathrooms were clean and the staff was pleasant during our visit, we stayed five days and found so much to see near by the campground. There is very nice boat ramp on the park for easy access to Smith Lake, the beach area is also a great asset. Clean with a well-marked swimming area with bathrooms near the beach area. 

The Houston Jail (http://soloso.com/houston/) was a few miles away, this is the only surviving jail constructed from logs in 1818. It’s a historical landmark and worth the short drive to go and see. 

Natural Bridge Park (https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/alabama/natural-bridge-al/) is located in Natural Bridge, Alabama is also nearby. This rock formation is the longest sandstone natural rock bridge east of the Rocky Mountains. It’s a good hike through well marked trails and there is a small gift shop that also sells refreshments.

Dismals Canyon (https://www.dismalscanyon.com/) is thirty miles from the campground near the town of Phil Campbell, Alabama. This natural formation will make you question if you are really in Alabama. The hike is a good way to spend the day in a shaded but humid natural wonder. You can also attend a night hike to see the dismalites that only reside in a few places in the world. 

The Bankhead National Forest surrounds the entire area. The forest is huge and trying to visit the area waterfalls and trails without a plan is not recommended. Take the time to study the area maps and map the accessible roads before heading out. We actually stopped by the NSFS Office to ask for information, there was also a large map of the area there you can take a picture of that will help you with your planning. 

We had a wonderful time here at Corinth, we especially liked the campground and the deer that would come out to graze every evening. This coupled with the fireflies really made this stay memorable, we’ll be back.

Great park just needs a little updating

Decent state park hosted by always friendly staff. Large swim beach with bath house and a few small playgrounds scattered throughout. several pavilions that can be reserved for parties. 4 camping sections with power and water, plus a primitive area. only about half have sewer, and even less have 50amp service. sewer sites are near the front of the campground, and one dump station near the back.

campsite sizes vary, and it can be difficult to find a site for larger campers. utility connections aren't always in the most appropriate spot (often need water hose or power cable of 25ft+) most sites do offer plenty of shade or a view of the lake.

Great park but sites are tight

Love Tannehill but the sites in Sec 1 are on top of each other.

They are building campgrounds currently

No campgrounds yet but the day area and boating area is very nice. Would definitely reccomend to anyone.

Very friendly and clean

This campground is ran by good people. The restrooms and grounds are kept very clean. They ride around to keep watch so no worries about anything. Would recommend to anyone.

Awesome home

Me and my 6 year old daughter hiked the trail this past Saturday, July 27, 2019. Had a great time. Definately be back

Candy mountain

Grounds not kept up Owner was nice Cigarette butts every where in our site along with beer bottle tops. Was not as comfortable as I like to be leaving my wife and children alone there. A friend said his tag was stolen off his rv while there. Same guy also said that the mans bull dog was swimming in the pool when he went.

Tannehill

Very tight spots. Lots of trees though for cover. Tomany things to mention to do at this park, particularly for history buffs. Numerous events held there. We very much enjoyed our stay would go back

Big campground on the lake

This is a work in progress as I just added this campground and will review as the days progress! So far, it is reasonably priced. It does require a BCDA permit which is $10 a person to make use of the lake and creeks.

There are RV plots with electric and water hook-ups and tent camping too. We have an Airstream on one site and three tents on another.

A picnic table is available at each site and campfire spots. Our sites overlook the lake and it is lovely so far. Super busy for the July 4 weekend!

Great overnight spot

Easily accessible spot to overnight. Close to Sipsey Wilderness and several waterfalls. Clean and quiet. Short paved walking trail, fishing pier, restrooms/showers.

Beautiful campground!

We have camped at this park several times. We have always enjoyed our stay. Most of the campsites are tucked away beneath a canopy of trees with nice shade. The bath houses are always clean, as well as the entire campground. It is great for a relaxing weekend getaway.

Cave and swim

Olympic size pool fed by cave water!! Kids loved this campground! Low and high dive, great gift shop and cave tours. Ready to go back!!

Beautiful Historic park

Great campsites creek for swimming and if your looking for a sweet treat stop in and grab some ice cream. Bathhouses need attention though wasn’t pleased.

Words really can't describe!

This campground cannot be beat. It is absolutely gorgeous. Sites are kept immaculate. Even the shower house is beautifully built. Babbling brooks are everywhere! And nothing makes a campground more than the camp host themselves. Wonderful people. It is deep in the wilderness so do not expect Wi-Fi or cell signal. It's nearly an hour to town come well-stocked!

Peaceful RV campground in the woods

Togetherness Works is 5 mile south of I-22/US-78 along a very good Alabama 253.  Junior Beasley and his wife have owned it for many years.  When they were able they were full time RVers and have traveled extensively around the country.  There are about eight sights all gravel and level.  The back in sites have a nice deck beside your parking spot.  There are also a few pull thrus for longer rigs or those who do not want to unhook. Very safe and secure.  It is a favorite location for Tiffin Wayfarer owners to stay since it's only 6 miles from the factory.  But everyone of us would stay here again regardless of it's proximity to the factory.  Just call ahead and Junior will meet you at the entrance and escort you to your site.  They also have a laundry facility for those dirty clothes.

Better sites further down the trail

This is a very small site on a busy trail that is located smack dab in the middle of the path. It does have easy access to water and a nice flat area to set up a tent but that is about it. There are much nicer more established sites a little further down that I would recommend more highly. Also, because of its location near the start, it gets pretty busy here. 

Sipsey Wilderness is a protected but unmaintained area in Northwest Alabama that is well known for its intersecting creeks, streams, and rivers that play together with the many waterfalls and magical rock faces. The wilderness area is contained within the larger Bankhead National Forest and is accessible from a variety of different trailheads many of which are only reachable on dirt roads. Hiking here you definitely get the feeling that you have left the rest of the world behind and are in complete wilderness. Different times of year provide completely different experiences whether its the exciting and boundless blooms of spring, the overgrown wild of summer, the bold and expansive colors of fall, or the high river levels and easy boating access of winter. Just make sure to always do your research and plan ahead since it can change so drastically depending on when you go. My favorite is either fall or spring since the summer can be particularly hot and buggy.

This trip we had planned to kayak down the river from the Sipsey River Trailhead to the Highway 33 Bridge take out but were thwarted by a recent lack of heavy rain and unusually low river levels for the season. Several sites online suggested over 4 feet gauge height would be fine but after talking to the Rangers we were told the only time that it was really navigable was in the winter or fall for a couple of days after a major rainfall. With that plan out the window, we decided instead to throw some packs in the car and move our gear around to make it a semi backpacking/hiking trip.

Close to the car

This site is the first one you see right when you get down the hill from the parking lot. It will also probably be the first site claimed since it is the easiest to see and clearly very nice with its spot overlooking the river. The site has plenty of space for several tents and a well-established firepit. The downside, however, is that you are right on the trail and very close to other campsites and the busy thoroughfare for other hikers. If you don't mind making conversation then I would highly suggest staking your claim and getting your tent set up so you can enjoy a relaxing night listening to the river.

Sipsey Wilderness is a protected but unmaintained area in Northwest Alabama that is well known for its intersecting creeks, streams, and rivers that play together with the many waterfalls and magical rock faces. The wilderness area is contained within the larger Bankhead National Forest and is accessible from a variety of different trailheads many of which are only reachable on dirt roads. Hiking here you definitely get the feeling that you have left the rest of the world behind and are in complete wilderness. Different times of year provide completely different experiences whether its the exciting and boundless blooms of spring, the overgrown wild of summer, the bold and expansive colors of fall, or the high river levels and easy boating access of winter. Just make sure to always do your research and plan ahead since it can change so drastically depending on when you go. My favorite is either fall or spring since the summer can be particularly hot and buggy.

This trip we had planned to kayak down the river from the Sipsey River Trailhead to the Highway 33 Bridge take out but were thwarted by a recent lack of heavy rain and unusually low river levels for the season. Several sites online suggested over 4 feet gauge height would be fine but after talking to the Rangers we were told the only time that it was really navigable was in the winter or fall for a couple of days after a major rainfall. With that plan out the window, we decided instead to throw some packs in the car and move our gear around to make it a semi backpacking/hiking trip.

Flood Safe Campground-Good for spring

This site is one of the furthest along this section of trail and is nice since it is one of the larger spaces in this area. Like all the other campsites it has easy access to water and nice coverage with trees. It is also relatively private but still close to the trail. Check out my video review for more specifics about this site.

Sipsey Wilderness is a protected but unmaintained area in Northwest Alabama that is well known for its intersecting creeks, streams, and rivers that play together with the many waterfalls and magical rock faces. The wilderness area is contained within the larger Bankhead National Forest and is accessible from a variety of different trailheads many of which are only reachable on dirt roads. Hiking here you definitely get the feeling that you have left the rest of the world behind and are in complete wilderness. Different times of year provide completely different experiences whether its the exciting and boundless blooms of spring, the overgrown wild of summer, the bold and expansive colors of fall, or the high river levels and easy boating access of winter. Just make sure to always do your research and plan ahead since it can change so drastically depending on when you go. My favorite is either fall or spring since the summer can be particularly hot and buggy.

This trip we had planned to kayak down the river from the Sipsey River Trailhead to the Highway 33 Bridge take out but were thwarted by a recent lack of heavy rain and unusually low river levels for the season. Several sites online suggested over 4 feet gauge height would be fine but after talking to the Rangers we were told the only time that it was really navigable was in the winter or fall for a couple of days after a major rainfall. With that plan out the window, we decided instead to throw some packs in the car and move our gear around to make it a semi backpacking/hiking trip.

Small Backcountry Site

Another great backcountry site in Sipsey, read below for more info about the area and the trails we took on our recent trip. Check out the video or photos for a better idea of what is available at this campground.

Sipsey Wilderness is a protected but unmaintained area in Northwest Alabama that is well known for its intersecting creeks, streams, and rivers that play together with the many waterfalls and magical rock faces. The wilderness area is contained within the larger Bankhead National Forest and is accessible from a variety of different trailheads many of which are only reachable on dirt roads. Hiking here you definitely get the feeling that you have left the rest of the world behind and are in complete wilderness. Different times of year provide completely different experiences whether its the exciting and boundless blooms of spring, the overgrown wild of summer, the bold and expansive colors of fall, or the high river levels and easy boating access of winter. Just make sure to always do your research and plan ahead since it can change so drastically depending on when you go. My favorite is either fall or spring since the summer can be particularly hot and buggy.

This trip we had planned to kayak down the river from the Sipsey River Trailhead to the Highway 33 Bridge take out but were thwarted by a recent lack of heavy rain and unusually low river levels for the season. Several sites online suggested over 4 feet gauge height would be fine but after talking to the Rangers we were told the only time that it was really navigable was in the winter or fall for a couple of days after a major rainfall. With that plan out the window, we decided instead to throw some packs in the car and move our gear around to make it a semi backpacking/hiking trip.

Woodsy and quiet

Well-kept grounds and friendly staff. My campsite was near the bathroom/shower which was convenient.  Enjoyed the hillside view I had and the walks in the woods surrounding the campground. My dogs took me for several long walks while we were here. Pull-thru site had a set of steps leading from the parking pad to the 'patio'. Very neat!

Another Fun Weekend at Clear Creek

See my previous full review of the campground below. We had site 5 this time with some friends next door on 4D.

Update from my previous review, they now except cards at check in for walk up sites. This is a big change as last time we were here, just a month back, they were cash only.

As always, very helpful staff and we love the water front sites with easy access to launch kayaks and canoes right from your site.

Great group site across the creek

Read below for my Sipsey Review and check out the video to get an idea of the site. This particular campsite is located at the intersect of several streams and is a beautiful spot with a large area to set up tents. Because it is actually slightly removed from the trail that most people take it has an incredible amount of privacy while not being cramped or crowded. Another thing I really loved about this site is that it is right along the water without the need to climb down any steep banks. This could be a problem in the spring time when there is a chance of flooding but normally it makes for a wonderful site. Finally, the flat tent areas at this site are mostly covered in sand which means you will have a very comfortable surface to sleep on. 

Sipsey Wilderness is a protected but unmaintained area in Northwest Alabama that is well known for its intersecting creeks, streams, and rivers that play together with the many waterfalls and magical rock faces. The wilderness area is contained within the larger Bankhead National Forest and is accessible from a variety of different trailheads many of which are only reachable on dirt roads. Hiking here you definitely get the feeling that you have left the rest of the world behind and are in complete wilderness. Different times of year provide completely different experiences whether its the exciting and boundless blooms of spring, the overgrown wild of summer, the bold and expansive colors of fall, or the high river levels and easy boating access of winter. Just make sure to always do your research and plan ahead since it can change so drastically depending on when you go. My favorite is either fall or spring since the summer can be particularly hot and buggy.

This trip we had planned to kayak down the river from the Sipsey River Trailhead to the Highway 33 Bridge take out but were thwarted by a recent lack of heavy rain and unusually low river levels for the season. Several sites online suggested over 4 feet gauge height would be fine but after talking to the Rangers we were told the only time that it was really navigable was in the winter or fall for a couple of days after a major rainfall. With that plan out the window, we decided instead to throw some packs in the car and move our gear around to make it a semi backpacking/hiking trip.

Small but convenient

Read below for a full review of Sipsey and this particular trip. This is a small site right along the trail with enough cleared flat space for a single tent and 2-3 people. It has a well-established fire put and a couple of rocks that could be used to sit on. It is also immediately adjacent to the stream but high enough on the bank that it is not at risk of flooding. If possible I suggest heading a little further down the trail to the next site but this is a good backup option if that one is already taken. One of the cool things someone set up at this spot is several flat rocks placed in the fire pit that will help protect the fire in case of wind and direct the heat towards the sitting area. I can see this being a real advantage if camping during the colder winter months. 

Sipsey Wilderness is a protected but unmaintained area in Northwest Alabama that is well known for its intersecting creeks, streams, and rivers that play together with the many waterfalls and magical rock faces. The wilderness area is contained within the larger Bankhead National Forest and is accessible from a variety of different trailheads many of which are only reachable on dirt roads. Hiking here you definitely get the feeling that you have left the rest of the world behind and are in complete wilderness. Different times of year provide completely different experiences whether its the exciting and boundless blooms of spring, the overgrown wild of summer, the bold and expansive colors of fall, or the high river levels and easy boating access of winter. Just make sure to always do your research and plan ahead since it can change so drastically depending on when you go. My favorite is either fall or spring since the summer can be particularly hot and buggy.

This trip we had planned to kayak down the river from the Sipsey River Trailhead to the Highway 33 Bridge take out but were thwarted by a recent lack of heavy rain and unusually low river levels for the season. Several sites online suggested over 4 feet gauge height would be fine but after talking to the Rangers we were told the only time that it was really navigable was in the winter or fall for a couple of days after a major rainfall. With that plan out the window, we decided instead to throw some packs in the car and move our gear around to make it a semi backpacking/hiking trip.

Nice, but not what I was looking for.

The campground was clean and stayed quiet. About 40 feet between sites. Trees but no underbrush, so no real privacy between sites. The campground is geared towards RV's. It's not bad. There is water and electric at all the sites. Dont plan on playing in the lake unless you get the outer side of the loop. It's good that the waterfront sites are not reservable in that you have a chance at something. I've never been one to plan out my camping weekends 42 years in advance like everyone else seems to. Its on the far south side of bankhead national forest. We went to hike some trails in the Sispey wilderness and it was about an hour drive to get up there. Our neighbors, which I think are camp hosts are friendly enough, but they left there dozen strands of led lights on all night. It looked like the Vegas strip not the woods. I prefer the woods. But if you like the big RV culture you will probably love this place. I'll keep looking for a quiet place in the woods.

Peaceful & Clean

This place is really nice; be sure to check your spot to make sure you can park easily- some sites are difficult for large pull trailers

Small but secluded

When we got to this campsite we were very excited and immediately began setting up in order to claim it early in the day. We really like how level it was and that it is removed from the trail so you still have privacy from other hikers. We ended up finding that the next site along the trail was also available and more spacious so we ended up moving there but this site is a good backup if that one is already claimed. Although it was relatively clear when we were there in early spring many of these sites off the trail can be hard to find when it starts getting more overgrown in summer. Read some of my other reviews from this area for more info about backpacking in Sipsey Wilderness.