THE BEST CAMPING IN
Nevada
336 Reviews 278 Campgrounds

Leave the glitz and glam of the Las Vegas Strip behind and come camping in Nevada. Explore the petroglyphs and ancient cultures at the Valley of Fire State Park or relax in the high alpine along the eastern shores of Lake Tahoe. With over 80% of the state dedicated as public lands, there’s an adventure for everyone.

For some of the best camping in Nevada, head to Pyramid Lake. Located just 40 miles outside of Reno, the lake offers a variety of camping and recreation options. Keep in mind that the lake is located on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe's Reservation. In order to camp here, you’ll need to obtain a permit first. Enjoy dispersed camping along the water’s edge. Don’t forget to bring your boat, SUP or kayak and cool off in the lake, be sure to check out the Pyramid Rock island and see how this awesome spot got its name.

The Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada’s largest state park, contains over 40,000 acres of stunning red rock formations peppered with ancient ruins and native artifacts left behind by the Ancient Puebloan People. Admire petroglyphs, climb the red rocks and uncover another world in this Mars-like landscape. Due to the sweltering summer temps, the Valley of Fire State Park offers perfect place for winter camping in Nevada.

Looking to climb a mountain? Consider hiking to the top of Mount Rose in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Although this area is quite popular and crowded during the summer months, it’s well-worth a trip to this sapphire, high-alpine oasis. Various camping options are available.

Located just outside of Las Vegas, Lake Mead is one of Nevada’s premier outdoor recreation areas. If you’re tired of the crowds, consider hiking up Black Mountain. This lesser-known trail can be done in a day and there is plenty of camping at nearby Lake Mead.

If you’re a national park lover, you’ve got to check out the quiet scenery at the Great Basin National Park. Dramatic mountain ridges meet sagebrush valleys at this little-visited park. Plenty of wildlife and excellent camp spots await you. With so many lakes, deserts and mountains, there are endless possibilities for Nevada camping. No matter where you choose to go in this great state, The Dyrt is here to help you find the perfect perch to pitch a tent.

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Recent Reviews in Nevada
Great place to hang in between travels.

This place has it all. Great pools, close to the strip, mini mart, restaurant etc. great for when you are on the road and want to hit the LV Strip up. This is not close to any mountain areas or hikes.

Newer, Clean Desert campsites

No thrills but clean and newer sites that are perfect for trekking into Red Rock.

Lake Mead Area sites

Stayed here after flying into Las Vegas. Sites were wide open. Some car traffic is heard, it’s right next to a fairly traveled road. Very clean sites and bathrooms.

Quick Vegas Getaway

Facilities are clean and spots are plentiful May-September due to the extreme heat. All sites are pull through RV sites that easily accommodate 2-3 tents (4man). Rumors have it they are clearing sites to create a tent only section but it will not be ready until fall 2020.

Until then expect to pay the $20/night + $10 utility hookup.

Clean up your shit! and others before you too!

Good sites with dirt road access. Need campers that care to help leave cleaner sites.

Great spot!

Pleasantly surprised by this park. The staff was wonderful & welcoming. We have a big 5th wheel & it accommodated us well as we were just traveling through.

First Camp of the Summer

It's a very clean campground. My wife and i set up camp on an early Saturday morning and for the rest of the day we enjoyed the weather and good conversation with the people camping up and down the road. The facility was well taken care of and have some great views especially during sunset. Looking forward to another visit there later this summer. H20 at each camp, restrooms only a few hundred feet from our site. The marina, RV camps and C-store were all operated by super friendly people.

Cheap

It’s ok just a parking lot with hookups but only like 24 a night I think

Great free spot

Established campground with limited spaces. We got the last space when we there and it was full the entire time but for good reason.

First to Review
Nice Free lakeside camp!

Dry camping right next to town. Good cell coverage and you can drive right up to the water. Looks like it may have been an established fee campground at some point.

Lake front camping.

Not sure why we would go to tent camp at Lake Mead in the middle of summer but we did, and we were not the only ones. It was 110 degrees during the day and 85 degrees at night. Quite miserable honestly. Tent sites were spacious and bathrooms were fairly clean. Ideal time to camp here would most likely be early Spring or late Fall.

Almost full even in bad weather!

Arrived around 5pm on a Tuesday the last day of April and even though the weather is crappy (low 40’s with intermittent rain/snow and a freeze warning), there were only a few spots left. Surprised to see several tent campers. As other reviews have pointed out, only the B Loop is open; the A loop is going to have electric (and water?) installed but no completion date was indicated. Would have been nice to have electric on these cold nights so we could plug in our portable heater. I think when Loop A is completed, it will be the nicer of the two - farther from the road and with aforementioned amenities. First Nevada State Park we’ve been to with flush toilets (but no soap and they could use a little maintenance work - some faucets missing and one toilet took extreme muscle to flush. I also felt like Goldilocks - one toilet was so low, I was squatting and another was so high, I had to hoist myself up!) Sites all looked level and most were back-in (even the handicapped ones) but ours (33) was a “pull-through”. All sites have a picnic table and fire ring but only some have shelters over the tables (a must on hot summer days). Very quiet in Site 33. I didn’t hear road noise some mentioned but those closer to the road might hear more. I can only imagine it would be a completely different scenario in the summer when people come to enjoy the lake. I would definitely recommend walking to the lake in the morning for nice reflection shots.

A peaceful spot

Stayed here for 4 nights in mid March. It was not our intended destination, but it was spring break and it’s where we ended up. In the end it was lovely. It’s a little strange, as there used to be a marina just below the campground, and the buildings and leftover equipment are still there, but not in use (other than an extremely sparsely stocked store and gas station.) The campground itself had some nicely shaded spots and decent privacy. The camp host was very pleasant and helpful as well. The weather was perfect and it was a great location for visiting Valley of Fire and Lake Mead.

One of my favorites

My friends and I came here as somewhat of a celebration vacation. We had a little trouble our first night because we arrived so late and the campsites are first come first serve, but the next day we were able to score two of the walk-in campsites. Both have fire rings and a picnic table, and it provided us with enough privacy to truly enjoy our space, but we were close enough to cook dinner and have fires together at night. It’s so incredible laying in a smooth rock cove, eating hot dogs and laughing with your friends! I love the walk in camp sites here and will probably be back in the future

Better than expected

I was apprehensive after reading reviews for this campground about how unlevel the sites were. We travel and sleep in our 17 foot van without leveling blocks so we need a level site. Yes, some were not level (but many of those were tent sites) but we found many that were just fine! Site 1 was very level (and could accommodate a large RV). Probably the cleanest pit toilets I have ever seen! Many sites had lots of privacy between them. We were there at the end of April so many roads and hiking trails were not yet open so we toured Lehman Caves which I highly recommend (reserve ahead of time at Recreation.gov). All tours were booked for a Monday in April (when we booked day before, there were still plenty of openings). Limited or no cell service.

Nice find!

Thanks to The Dyrt, found this place to land last night. Not your typical campground; the sites are lined up along the lake with the only privacy being the space (decent) between sites. We were there during the week at the end of April and it was pretty quiet but I imagine that is not the case in the summer. Each site has a cement pad, table, fire ring, bbq, and wind screen. The screen didn’t help last night as it was very windy and blowing in another direction! Clean Pit toilets and no hook-ups. Beautiful view of the snow capped mountains but woke to snow the next morning!

Better than expected

I was apprehensive after reading reviews for this campground about how unlevel the sites were. We travel and sleep in our 17 foot van without leveling blocks so we need a level site. Yes, some were not level (but many of those were tent sites) but we found many that were just fine! Site 1 was very level (and could accommodate a large RV). Probably the cleanest pit toilets I have ever seen! Many sites had lots of privacy between them. We were there at the end of April so many roads and hiking trails were not yet open so we toured Lehman Caves which I highly recommend (reserve ahead of time at Recreation.gov). All tours were booked for a Monday in April (when we booked day before, there were still plenty of openings). Limited or no cell service.

No wild horses, but a great campground!

This Nevada State Recreation Area is in a beautiful very remote location, along the Wild Horse reservoir. There are two camping areas with about a dozen sites in each. Each site has a nice picnic table, rain / sunshade, and fire ring…and lots of sun for the solar panel. The bathroom facilities are the fanciest we've ever seen for $15 per night. Can you say, "Custom tiled shower?" Someone did a really nice job. And, the campground is kept emaculate.

Just below the campground is a boat ramp and parking lot and swimming beach area. The lake is great for boating, fishing and paddling. The winds we experienced would make it a great lake for sailing, and sailboarding. There are numerous hikes along forest roads in the area that will get you up into the mountains (and even up to an old gold mine), but not alot of "trail hikes." Mountain biking is a great option along these backroads.

The nearest town with services is Owyhee, gas and small grocery store, about 35 miles to the north. There was no cell service in the campground, but we found it on our hike up the mountain!

Bird watchers paradise, with amazing views to boot!

Just like the next door campground of Coyote Cove, these shoreline campsites lack a lot of charm. But with your eyes constantly drawn to the Ruby Mountain's striking beauty, who needs anything more than the usual picnic table, sunshade, wind block screen, and fire ring. The pit toilets were clean and tidy, but there was no drinking water available at this campground.  

The Jet Ski Beach is a great beach for swimming, launching canoes, kayaks, small fishing boats, or personal watercraft. The boat launch and boat trailer parking lot is in the nearby Coyote Cove campground. The area offers opportunities for water sports of all kinds, hiking & mountain biking along many trails, or just sitting by the shore with a line in the water. Bird life is abundant in this area, with many species stopping along their migration route. We saw Loons, Dowitchers, White Pelicans, Coots and even the shy Hermit Thrush.  

The closest town with services is Spring Creek a short 12 miles away, a dozen more miles northwest is the city of Elko which has all the usual suburban amenities and big box stores and interstate 80 running through the middle of town. We had good mobile service and data throughout the campground. Showers, water and a dump station are available at the developed campground across the lake, though it is only open from Spring until Fall, depending upon weather conditions.

Ruby views will keep you coming back!

Along the south west side of South Fork reservoir, these functional spots carry all the charm of a dirt parking lot, but the views of the Ruby Mountains reflected in the lake will keep you coming back. Each site offers a picnic table, sunshade, wind block screen, and fire ring. The pit toilets were clean and tidy, but there was no drinking water available at this campground.  

The Coyote Cove is a great beach for swimming, and launching canoes and kayaks, or small fishing boats. The boat launch and boat trailer parking lot is on the south side of the campground. The area offers opportunities for water sports of all kinds, hiking & mountain biking along many trails, or just sitting by the shore with a line in the water. Bird life is abundant in this area, with many species stopping along their migration route. We saw Loons, Dowwitchers, White Pelicans, Coots, and even the shy Hermit Thrush.  

The closest town with services is Spring Creek a short 12 miles away, a dozen more miles northwest is the city of Elko which has all the usual suburban amenities. We had good mobile service and data throughout the campground. Showers, water and a dump station are available at the developed campground across the lake, though it is only open from Spring until Fall, depending upon weather conditions.

Up Up Upper Lehman...keep on climbing!

Sitting at about 7750 feet within Great Basin National Park, this small campground offers glorious views of the surrounding mountains. Each site has 1-2 huge picnic tables, fire pit and grill, and many have tent pads. The campground is well-maintained and the pit toilets are kept stocked and immaculately clean. We visited in late April and the water in the campground was not yet turned on for the season (though there is an active stream running through the campground, so you can filter water). The Lehman Caves Visitor Center also has drinking water available.

One issue to note is that most of parking pads are not very level (to help with snow melt) in the upper campground, so it made it quite challenging to level our little camper -- probably the most challenging over the past 6.5 years! But, we got it leveled and had plenty of sun for our solar panel in site 10. Lots of trees between sites offer a good deal of privacy, too.

Because of the big winter in 2019, the scenic road was not yet open, so we walked up it for a few miles to enjoy some long range views of the desert valley (Great Basin) below. The road is an 8% grade, so be ready to expand those lungs at 8000 feet! We also went on a challenging snowshoe hike up the Lehman Creek trail, which starts right from the campground.  The jewel of this park during the off/shoulder season is Lehman Cave, with fun ranger-led tours starting right from the visitor center.

This park is truly in the middle of nowhere, with almost no development (yay!!) close to the entrance. What that means is that you need to come prepared with groceries and supplies as not much is available in the tiny hamlet of Baker, which is about 6 miles from the campground. There is a tiny café by the Visitor Center if you need it, too.

Campsites are first-come, first-served and you can use a credit card or cash to make your payment. Not much service in the park as a whole, but we could get a call out if need be.

Caves, Glacier, and Deserts...Oh My!

Sitting at about 7300 feet within Great Basin National Park, this small campground offers glorious views of the valley below. Each site has a huge picnic table, fire pit and grill, and many have tent pads. The campground is well-maintained and the pit toilets are kept stocked and immaculately clean. We visited in late April and the water in the campground was not yet turned on for the season (though there is an active stream running through the campground, so you can filter water). The Lehman Caves Visitor Center also has drinking water available. Lots of trees between sites offer a good deal of privacy, too.

Because of the big winter in 2019, the scenic road was not yet open, so we walked up it for a few miles to enjoy some long range views of the desert valley (Great Basin) below.  The road is an 8% grade, so be ready to expand those lungs at 8000 feet! We also went on a challenging snowshoe hike up the Lehman Creek trail, which starts right from the upper campground.  The jewel of this park during the off/shoulder season is Lehman Cave, with fun ranger-led tours starting right from the visitor center.

This park is truly in the middle of nowhere, with almost no development (yay!!) close to the entrance. What that means is that you need to come prepared with groceries and supplies as not much is available in the tiny hamlet of Baker, which is about 6 miles from the campground.

Campsites are first-come, first-served and you can use a credit card or cash to make your payment. Note: This lower campground fills up fast during busy weekends because the sites are good and level for RV's.

First to Review
Not as “modern” but more beautiful!

There are two campgrounds in Valley of Fire: Atlatl with showers, modern bathrooms, and RV hookups but we decided on Arch Rock. Only vault toilets but the 29 campsites are tucked in among the red rocks more so than at Atlatl. Some are more private than others (22-24 are the best in my opinion). We ended up at 27 which had a nice secluded area where we could enjoy a campfire. Stargazing was amazing! (Hard to believe we were only an hour from the light pollution of Las Vegas!) Each Site has a fire ring and bbq. Sites are large and each has a covered picnic table (essential in the heat). They are very sandy and you will get sand and pebbles in your sandals if that is your footwear of choice! The flies were pesky, there was no cell service and be aware your voice will echo among the rocks but this was a very beautiful setting to camp! No reservations and we were lucky to get a site on a Friday at the end of April.

Nice Blend of Shade & Sun on the Shores of Lake Mead

After 4 glorious days kayak camping along the Black Canyon, we moved our basecamp to Boulder Beach and spent a couple of days getting reorganized to hit the road further north. Since the wind was too strong to get out on the lake, we opted to bike along the path that runs next to the campground.  This gorgeous path is well-utilized by area cycling groups, and they are some of the most courteous and safe cyclists we’ve ever come across. 

Each site has a picnic table, fire ring, and all the sites are paved and level.  Don't normally love paved campgrounds, but the wind is so strong at times that it would be a total dust storm without them. All sites have a nice view of Lake Mead, but there is no water access to the lake from the campground. The bathrooms have running water and are kept clean and well stocked, but there are no showers. Water spigots are scattered throughout the campground and there is a sewage dump for RV’s. Most of the sites are designed for large RV’s, but there were some tent campers there as well.

Closest town is Boulder City, about 16 miles away, and has everything you need. There is strong cell service in the campground, and free wifi.

Camp Among Ancient Rocks

This place is crazy unbelievably beautiful -- a true jackpot just northeast of Las Vegas. The rock formations are like something out of a Dr. Seuss book.

There are two different camping areas, with most of the sites tucked in among the red rock formations. We got there late in the day and got the last spot during Spring Break week!  Most of the sites are designed for tents or small van/campers, with just a handful of dedicated RV spaces with water/electric at each site for $10 more per night. Each site is equipped with a covered picnic table and firepit/grill, and there are water spigots and bathrooms with toilets/showers scattered throughout the campgrounds.

Be sure to stop by the Visitor Center and check out their film and displays as the geology of this place is quite unique. It was like no other that we’ve seen over the past 6.5 years of full-time, though it’s kind of a combination of many (Death Valley, Red Rocks Canyon, and a bit of Bryce Canyon). Driving the scenic road is great, but get out and hike, hike, hike to really see this place!  The crowds will go to the popular places like the Fire Wave (which is awesome), but some of the other areas are just as jaw dropping and no one is there. We even saw a desert tortoise eating some Beaver Tail Cactus on one of the less popular hikes, which is an extra special wildlife sighting.

The closest town with supplies is Overton, about 12 miles away from the east gate.

Camping is first-come, first-served, with no reservations. Note: if you don’t get lucky and get a spot in the park like we did, there are BLM areas just south and just north of the park itself, but you’ll still have to pay the entrance fee of $10 for each day you come into the park itself.

Located in one of the oldest settled Valleys in Nevada

If you like Bird Watching (or wildlife in general), Boating, Fishing, Hang Gliding, Paragliding, Equestrian Activities, Camping or BBQ's, or even history, then this is a place you might enjoy.

The lake and the surrounding area takes on a different appearance depending on the season you visit, and whether it's been a wet year or a dry one. Sometimes when it has been extremely dry, the larger of the 2 lakes dries up either partially or entirely, leaving the smaller one as a valuable water source for Wild Mustangs who live in the area. (which is a great opportunity for photographers).

When the larger lake bed dries up a little, it extends the hang gliding / paragliding landing zone. (take off point is up on the hill on Eastlake Blvd, which is also a good view point of the lakes).

During the wetter years, the larger lake fills up, allowing water activities such as boating to take place on both lakes, and provides you with the opportunity to bird watch at any of the wildlife viewing areas provided. The smaller lake also provides bird watching opportunities (Osprey and other birds of prey like to fish there) You can also fish at the smaller lake, just don't eat them, the area was once used for the processing mills during the mining boom.

Also if you are into wildlife, there is the occasional coyote hunting the area, owls, hawks, bald eagles, and if you want to see deer, take a little drive up Eastlake Blvd towards little Washoe Lake, and one of the fields on the right often has huge herds of Mule Deer, and the occasional wild horse. Talking of Wild horses, you are requested not to feed or harass the wild Mustangs anywhere in Nevada (Washoe lake park included). Horses can be defensive, especially when they have young foals. Also feeding them anything other than what they naturally eat in the wild, not only causes a high number of deaths in the herds, it also creates dangerous situations on the roadways when horses come to retrieve the food. (it can also cost you thousands of dollars in fines) There are people who regularly monitor the interaction visitors have with the horses. But if you want to interact with a horse, why not bring your own for a ride around too, people often bring their horses down for a trot around the grounds.

There are restrooms available throughout the park, and facilities for camping. It is a good place for dogs, though it is requested that you clean up after them. There are doggie clean up stations available, and containers for waste.

The land the park sits on was once owned by one of Nevada's wealthiest men Theodore Winters, who was a prominent businessman and politician in early Nevada history. He once owned some of the most famous racehorses in the world, and his cheese was world renown. His Ranch is still around, and you can find it located just on the other side of the lake (Old Route 395), not far from the Chocolate Nugget Candy Factory (which is great if you get a hankering for something sweet), and Old Washoe City.

The lake's history goes back even further than that, the area was once inhabited by the local tribes people, and before the early pioneer's came and settled here, they used hunt ducks on the lake, and fished here. There is probably still the odd chance you might come across old Native tools and arrowheads, but the State of Nevada does ask you to leave artifacts where they are found. Check the local and federal laws before attempting to remove anything.

It has some lovely sunsets here, the view can be spectacular at times and changes according to season and weather, and the wildlife seem to enjoy it. Nice place to go and hang out with family and friends, and if you happen to forget to bring anything, you are only a little drive from Carson City :)

Impromptu wonderful overnight!

Couldn't find a spot in 2 other campgrounds around Las Vegas Valley so decided to try Boulder beach and must say we were delighted and suprized! Wonderfully beautiful campground with super clean restrooms! Watched the super moon! Perfect night!

Campground is right next to Avi Casino

This KOA is right next to the AVI Casino. Looks like a great place to stay if you don't want to pay casino room prices, but have all the convinces of staying at AVI. Journey is literally right across the street, and you can walk over for many things to do at the AVI resort.

Right next to the Laughlin casino, and everything on the strip!

Nice place to RV if you don't want to stay in the casino. It's right across the street of all the nearby casinos, mall and eateries of all sorts including in and out burger. Basically you can stay in your own home while enjoying all of the luxurious of staying at many casinos and indulging in their buffets.

Cell signal for t-mobile is awesome here!

QUITE CALM RELAXING

What a wonderful place kinda of a mom and pops spot great location from the park

Chuck and Jen were wonderful we hung out at the bar and had a great time will stay again and again