The best camping in
West Virginia

465 Reviews 217 Campgrounds
Camping West Virginia

With over 40 state and national parks, West Virginia’s vast mountainous wilderness begs to be explored. In less than a day’s drive from the Mid-Atlantic’s urban corridor, you can be paddling in swirling whitewater, camping in pristine mountain forests, or stargazing in some of the clearest night skies in the East. It’s time to plan your trip camping in West Virginia!

West Virginia’s inspiring geology has been carved by some of the world’s oldest rivers. Experience these ancient natural forces up close by exploring the nation’s premier whitewater rafting location, New River Gorge. The New River Gorge National River, part of the United States National Park System, extends 53-miles in southern West Virginia. Along with some of the best paddling in the country, rock climbers flock to the 1,400 established climbs in the sandstone cliffs. 70,000-acres of wilderness offer free riverfront primitive camping spots, while campers who want more amenities can take advantage of several private campgrounds in nearby Fayetteville, WV.

If you find yourself camping in West Virginia’s New River Gorge in October, you might catch Bridge Day, the world’s largest extreme sports event. Cheer on BASE jumpers as they leap 900-feet from the top of the river’s bridge while you enjoy local food and craft vendors, live music, and great mountain views.

When planning a trip camping in West Virginia, don’t miss the chance to take in the views from West Virginia’s most famous landmark, Seneca Rocks. Located in the Monongahela National Forest, and renowned for its incredible beauty, this natural landmark rises nearly 900-feet above the North Fork River. Especially well-known in rock climbing circles, the impressive rock formation offers 375 of the most technical mapped climbing routes in the eastern United States. Non-climbers can take in the view from the top by lacing up their boots. The Seneca Rocks Hiking Trail climbs the observation platform and is a day hike suitable for all ages.

Facilities for tent and RV camping, rental cabins, and primitive campsites are available nearby. A local favorite, Seneca Shadows Campground, offers views of the rocks from your campsite, as well as modern facilities including flush toilets and picnic tables. No matter where your outdoor adventures take you in the Wild and Wonderful state, with The Dyrt you’ll find the best camping in West Virginia along the way!

EXPLORE
Recent Reviews in West Virginia
Nice campground

A friend and I stayed here 3 nights while visiting Marlinton for the annual Roadkill Cook-off. Facilities are decent however Wi-Fi is extremely weak if you are more than a couple hundred feet from the restrooms. Because this entire area of WV is in the National Radio Quiet Zone, there is zero cellular service with 1-2 hours drive in any direction. If you can't get the weak WiFi service, you won't be using any data services. (Not necessarily a bad thing, but don't expect to notify family that you have arrived or are ok. Also, make sure any electronic devices you will be using for navigation have offline maps loaded before visiting.) One huge gripe is that technically you are limited to 1 sleeping unit per site, even if you only have 2 or 3 people sleeping in individual 1-person tents or a hammock. This either is not listed in the reservations information or is buried in the small print. The person checking us in told us about this, but allowed the 2 of us to camp in the same site. Being strictly a motorcycle camping person, neither I nor any traveling companions would be packing s large tent that could house all of us. The same thing could be said of 2 or 3 backpackers traveling together. For the nearly $30/night charge, this would become FAR too expensive and I'm not likely to stay here again simply because of the fear that the campground's silly rule might be enforced the next time.

Resident Beaver

Just a quick FYI, there is no camping in the winter. We stopped by for an overnight while enroute to Ohio. I don’t always check ahead while road tripping , I see a recreation sign and decide to stop for the night. This CCC State Park is very picturesque and has several hiking trails and the man-made lake is small but offers plenty of recreation possibilities.

I found the layout a little strange. The visitors center/ office sits right on the entry road but there is no parking in front of it. If you need to stop there use the parking area immediately to your right and then walk up.

The staff was limited , one grumpy older gentleman who never said a word to mej, just gave me sour looks like I was somehow putting him out by walking into the office. The younger gentleman was very informative and helpful. He answered questions about the parks history and suggested the best trails due to the slippery weather that was going on. We enjoyed a hike around the lake and then went on our way. I will be back for their camping season and to check out more of the trails. You could easily spend some time here and enjoy the surrounding area attractions. Check out Chocolate Moose in Beckley if you enjoy unique tasty coffee and excellent, friendly service and Tamarack for some West Virginia local art.

Loved staying here.

Awesome campground in the middle of the mountains. We were looking for a get away and found this gem. The owners are great, showers clean and had plenty of space.

Beautiful and Relaxing.

Beautiful RV Park.  Wonderful sites for parking your RV.  Very well lit with very modern water and electric hook ups.  All slips have a fire pit, bar-b-que grill and picnic tables.  Pavilions have great lighting and dimmers for a softer light.  They also have commercial metal tables to use to prepare and serve meals.  One is equipped with a sink for easy cleanup.  The park is right on the beautiful Elk River where you can swim, float or kayak.  I love this park!!

Great camp ground!

We stayed here to smoke test our new camper trailer and had a great experience! Relatively small and deep within the state forest, you'll start to wonder if you passed it by the time you get there, but keep going and you'll eventually arrive! The staff is finally, the campground well equipped, and the bath house was clean, though it could use a coat of paint inside.

Nice, quiet campground

Nice little campground. Great spot for fly fishing. Lots of hiking trails, fishing spots and caverns! When we got here, we read signs about “no pets”, but they didn’t ask when making the reservation, so we had no idea until a few days after being here. We have an old dog, and nobody has said anything. We would stay here again, when in this area.

Peak Bagging Coolness!

Spruce Knob is West Virginia's highest peak and on a clear day offers breathtaking 360 degree views from the Observation Tower.      https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mnf/recarea/?recid=7053

Because of the thick conifer growth, long mountain views don't occur till nearly to the top and that only along the western roadway…but once you climb the observation tower…(as mentioned, on a clear day) you are rewarded with wonderful views of WV and VA mountains.  Watching storm clouds or simple clouds roll in and envelope the Knob offers a wonderful experience.

I've taken the opportunity to camp on Spruce Knob on several occasions, once to the NE of the parking lot just into the pines, once a couple hundred yards down the Seneca Backcountry trail to the right and once directly south of the Tower in the pines.  Each offered a differ experience.  There is no cost, which is a huge plus!

In the pines, just below the summit, it is eerily quiet and muffled.  I've never seen another camper when I've stayed, so the solitude is glorious.

If you want shelter and a picnic table for cooking/eating…they are available, but only along the parking lot.  Pit latrines are nearly on the summit in the parking lot near the trailhead for the Observation Tower.  So practice leave no trace when camping and hiking!! No water, so bring enough with you. There are waste receptacles but be wise and take trash with you. 

There are two levels to the concrete Observation Tower…and best views are from the upper level. I've often though about cowboy camping on the second level after the last sightseer has left for the night, but haven't seen, heard or read if its forbidden or permitted…so I haven't…yet.

Obviously, on a clear night, star gazing is incredible as there no ambient light. It is much cooler at this elevation, even in the summer…and the winds on the summit cut through like a knife. 

Note: utilize good camping practices and set camp on a previous location where there is an established fire ring. Again, use caution with campfires because of the wind.

If you desire a more established campground, Spruce Knob Lake Campground is not too far away…down the mountain.

Spruce Knob summit camping is a family highlight!

Far from the hectic pace!

Red Creek Campground is positioned a decent drive down gravel National Forest roads, so it does not see the amount of traffic that easier, closer campgrounds get.      https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mnf/recreation/natureviewing/recarea/?recid=7003&actid=63

With a season of Mid-April through the beginning of December, be assured that weather is always a factor. Family has been thwarted at Thanksgiving by unpassable snow without a 4x4. Rain is almost certain, as the varied elevation nearly creates its own weather patterns.  So my first recommendation is to always add rain gear and cold weather garments for insurance.

We ordinarily visit during the month of August and being a "fly by the seat of my pants" type of roaming tent camper…I have arrived to see Red Creek Campground full…as these sites are non-reservable. 

Keep in mind, Red Creek Campground is "primitive"…no modern facilities, no showers, no electric…and the only running water accessible, is a small spring pipe (that I highly recommend filtering before use even though it does not post that).

Sites on the outer portion of the loop are fairly concealed from one another by trees and undergrowth…the inner loop sites are a little more exposed.  Gravel parking at sites and each site offers a picnic table a fire ring and lantern post. All sites are a short distance to the two individual unisex pit lantrines in the center of the campground.

With no ambient light, the night skies are amazing…though cloud cover always seem to plague my visits at night. Though one evening we drove down toward Bear Rocks and laid in an open field to stargaze one evening to enjoy a wonderful light show from shooting stars. We were so quiet, several deer passed between us within arms reach…a little disconcerting but we survived.

Trails are abundant and some leave directly from the campground deeper into the Wilderness Area. Choose footwear wisely, as the trails are strewn with sharp rocks (on certain trails), various stream and river crossings, shoe-swallowing mud bogs along with the regular ol' dirt trail.  Bring a trail map, water…and/or a water filter…and raingear.

Nearby Bear Rocks is a fun scamper for "kids" of all ages and the views eastward share WV and Virginia mountain ranges.

We were thrilled to visit when "Bird Banding" is taking place and enjoyed searching for migrating birds caught in the netting on the east side of the road opposite the campground.

For a peaceful, relaxing camping experience that offers great hiking, and some of the most amazing flora and fauna…its a family favorite!

Waterfalls, Trails and Long Valley Views!

Blackwater State Park, Davis, WV https://wvstateparks.com/park/blackwater-falls-state-park/

Camping anywhere in West Virginia is a highlight, but this area offers hiking views aplenty.

Most will travel by Canaan Valley State Park entrance and the back road to Dolly Sods Wilderness Area to arrive at Blackwater Falls State Park…but very worthwhile.

This campground is very popular and fills up quickly. I’ve only visited during midweek and prime sites are still difficult to find. Reservations can be made online and are recommended during peak season. Cabins are also available for rental.

The campground office is small but sites are paid for there ($23 non electric/$26 electric)… firewood and ice are available there also.

I’ve only camped in the non-electric loops (to the left). and usually along the far wood line. There are 65 sites in all, less than half offer electric.

Obviously, the biggest draw is the cascading 57ft Blackwater Falls, but there are other smaller falls (Elakala Falls) in the State Park. Trails abound with some pretty incredible long valley views. Lindy Point and Pendleton Point Overlook are two big draws. All worthwhile. Note: The walk down to the bottom of the Blackwater Falls include many steps…not handicap accessible to the lower levels.

The Trading Post by the falls is enjoyable and will satisfy your search for trinkets.

During my stays the campground has been quiet and relaxing. The centrally located restrooms/showerhouse is spartan but clean and well-stocked.

Deer meandered through the unattended Campsites two of my three stays, so it can be very quiet. Trees exist on outside perimeter sites that can be utilized for hammocking…and some inner loop sites. The sites have level grassy areas for tents…parking pads are all fairly sufficient for pop-ups or moderate-sized campers. On my visits, RV/campers were primarily in the loop to the right of the office.

The nearby town has a small grocery store and several fantastic eateries.

Shoulder season solitude...flora and fauna delight

Dolly Sods Wilderness Area, part of the Monongahela National Forest, offers something for every hiker, backpacker, camper.

Having visited Dolly Sods numerous times at the Red Creek Campground, using that as the base camp to launch off to explore the myriad of trails. We decided to use the backcountry as a primer for the following year's longer westerly  backbacking trip. 

Know that it will likely rain on you in Dolly Sods, so always bring rain gear. Also realize, that with climate and conditions similar to the Canadian Tundra, temperatures and winds vary and fluctuate often, any time of year. Those two conditions often dissuade less hearty souls…but they are also exactly what creates and sustains a very beautiful environment.

During our excursion, we spent three nights and four days on what I will term the perimeter trails…camping at Raven Ridge, Big Stonecoal Run creek, and at Reds Creek at the forks. Numerous websites offer insight and directions and all are beneficial to study. We chose to travel counter-clockwise from Bear Rocks, parking in the grass across from the trailhead. Note: leaving valuables in or on your vehicle while you traipse about in the Sods is always iffy, just like anywhere else, so use wisdom. I've read of thefts…but the vehicle parked to us had two high end full-suspension mountain bikes on a roof rack for days without issue.

If you are unfamiliar with Dolly Sods Wilderness trails…choose footwear that either dries fast or is waterproof…has a robust sole to fend off bruises from the brutal amount of sharp, ankle buster rocks on the trail…and won't pull off and be lost in the countless bogs and areas of shoe sucking mud. We wanted to rename one particular trail "pointed rock trail." Our expensive boots were actually a fail for this trip…which was a valuable education.

We saw people run this trail in a day…but there's no way you can enjoy the sights, sounds, and smells moving that quickly. I felt we should've taken more time and explored much more…although soggy weather became a deterrent. The amount of brightly colored fungi, snakes, crayfish and salamanders were astonishing. So if you move too quickly, you miss them.

Do practice "leave no trace." The heavy summer and weekend use by careless and selfish hikers or backcountry partiers…has left the woods adjacent to Reds Creek camping sites littered with toilet paper…dig your cat hole and bury your "goods!"

The rocks on the trail may be a pain, but the formations and views from Raven's Ridge, Lion's Head and Bear Rocks rival the best.

Do your homework, choose your camping gear and wardrobe wisely and launch off into the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area…you'll be glad you did!

Huge Sites At A Remote, Primitive Campground

The Spruce Knob Lake Campground offers extra-large camp sites with lots of shade and so much undergrowth I only saw my neighbors when I took a walk to check out the campground. There are 45 campsites, with pit toilets and a solar-powered pump house for drinking water. No electric or sewer hook-ups, but you’ll find free apples growing at some of the sites. Sites#31 through 41 are walk-in sites for extra privacy if you’re tent camping. 

This is bear country, so don’t leave any food sitting out. Dogs are allowed as long as they’re kept on a leash. 

Spruce Knob Lake is less than a mile away and a great spot to kayak, fish, and star gaze because you won't have any city lights to interfere and trees won’t block your view. There’s a boat dock and wheelchair accessible fishing pier with the lake stocked with trout several times a year. Electric motors only; No swimming allowed. 

There are at least 60-miles of trails in the surrounding Monongahela National Forest, including the very pleasant, 1-mile, Big Bend River Trail accessible from the campground.

If you’re up for a hardy hike, you can walk 8-miles east to Spruce Knob, the highest place in the State of West Virginia at 4,863-feet. There’s a cool lookout tower at Spruce Knob where you can get a good view of the rugged mountain ridges where the red spruce get so hammered by the wind and rough weather, one side of the tree is missing. The plant life is pretty unique too, with reindeer moss visible along the Whispering Spruce Trail. 

The drive to the Spruce Knob Lake Campground is on a combination of narrow, winding, mostly unpaved roads. Go slow because there are plenty of blind curves. My A/C was out on the day I arrived, so I ate a fair amount of dust with my window partially open… Lol…. 

Directions from the Recreation.gov website: 

From Riverton, WV, take U.S. Route 33 south 2 miles to Briery Gap Road(County Road 33/4). Turn right onto Briery Gap Road. Go 2 miles to Forest Road 112, turn right and continue for 13.5 miles. Turn right on Forest Road 1. The campground is 1/2 mile on the right. From Elkins, WV, take U.S. Route 33 to State Route 29, which is 1 mile west of Harman. Turn right onto SR 29, go south 18.6 miles and tum left onto Forest Road 1. Follow FR 1 for 2.5 miles.

Note:  Seneca Rocks is less than an hour away and well-worth a visit!

Great little RV campground

Only 10 sites right on the river. Great fishing. Very quiet. Full hookups for RVs including cable. A little pricey for the area. I Would stay here again. Easy access to Dolly Sods, short drive to Seneca Rocks and Spruce Knob. Did I mention access to multiple areas for great trout fishing.

Allegheny Plateau and Dolly Sods Wilderness

Small, primitive campground with 12-sites.  There were a surprising number of trailers and small RVs when I visited, especially when you consider visitors have to drive about 10-miles on a graded dirt road to get there.

There are some walk-in tent sites for more privacy and you have the option of pure wilderness camping in the surrounding 17,400 acres of Dolly Sods as long as you use existing campfire rings, or use a backpack stove when you can't find one.

No cell phone service or Internet… No electricity, pit toilets, and a busted water pump, but there is a fresh-water spring. Each site has a picnic table, fire ring and lantern pole. 

The camp hosts are super mellow and also lead the volunteer bird-banding that takes place just across the road from the Red Creek Campground.  

The plant life and weather at Dolly Sods are similar to Northern Canada, so bring some extra layers. It was at least 15-degrees cooler than the valley when I reached the peak of the Allegheny Plateau. Add the wind and I had to put my sweatshirt after sweating in a T-shirt at Seneca Rocks that same day. 

Bring a backpack and good hiking boots so you're prepared to experience some of the most amazing scenery and wildlife you’ve ever seen! 

First-come, first-serve only and often full on weekends.

*Word of caution: Dolly Sods was used for military training during WWII, so there are artillery and mortar shells still being found in this wilderness. Don’t touch any shells you might find, note the location and report to authorities.

Perfect Location!

If you're a fan of hiking and rock climbing at Seneca Rocks, Seneca Shadows is absolutely the best campground near this fantastic rock formation. 

It’s located in the Monongahela National Forest near the North Fork South Branch of the Potomac River with nearby peaks ranging from 1,000 feet to nearly 5,000 feet above sea level. Seneca Shadows campground offers a view of the famed Seneca Rocks and puts you within walking distance of the visitor’s center, hiking and climbing trails, plus the quaint town of Seneca Rocks where you buy gas, food and gifts. 

Make sure you visit Harper’s Old Country Store, a 4th generation family run business, operating since 1902. The visitor’s center has a nice collection of Native American artifacts and a cool video of the Army soldiers who trained here before WWII. 

Seneca Shadows Campground is a modern campground with paved parking, flush toilets, showers and an amphitheater. Each site has a picnic table, fire ring and lantern post. Seneca Shadows is part of a growing trend where a private concessionaire is a running a public camp-ground. I’m not a huge fan since it often mean higher fees, but I must say that the campground was spotless and well-run by a delightful couple who obviously enjoyed their summer job. 

Seneca Shadows Campground has three loops to chose from: 

The A& B Loops are for tents or RVs with no electric service. 

The C-Loop has electricity. 

There's also a group camping area and a "tent-only" camping area with walk-in sites from a nearby parking lot.

Spruce Knob and Dolly Sods are nearby and both deserve a spot on your outdoor adventure“bucket list” in West Virginia.

Hikers' Heaven

North Bend State Park is located at the halfway point of the 72-mile North Bend Rail Trail, so it’s a great camping spot for hikers, bikers and horseback riders who want to explore this scenic trail which crosses 35-bridges and cuts through 11-tunnels where the B&O Railroad used to travel. 

I highly recommend this trail to hikers because the scenery is spectacular, the wildlife plentiful, and the tunnels are really cool. The trail passes through some quaint towns such as the former oil boom-town of Cairo where many of the buildings from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s are still standing. 

North Bend State Park has a year-round lodge, year-round cabins and two campgrounds open from mid-April to mid-November. 

The Cokeley Campground has 28-sites with both water and electricity, picnic tables and fire pits. The bathhouse includes a small coin-op laundry. It’s close to the boat dock at North Bend Lake. I didn’t select this campground because it doesn’t have much shade.

I stayed at the River Run Campground which has 49-sites along the shores of the North Fork of the Hughes River with electric and non-electric sites to choose from. Four sites are ADA accessible. Each site has paved parking, a picnic table and fire pit. The bathhouse was clean and nicely tiled with hand soap and paper towels provided. The on-site staff was extremely friendly and you get a generous wheelbarrow full of firewood, cut from local downed trees, for$5. 

The lodge looked a little dated, but had a good home-style restaurant which was popular with travelers. The year-round cabins have been updated with ADA wheelchair ramps and wraparound decks. I may return and rent one after the campground closes so I can do some cross- country skiing on the North Bend Rail Trail this winter.

I paddled on the North Bend Lake which was extremely peaceful and beautiful, with the colors of fall surrounding me on all sides. I brought my own kayak, but they had boats for rent. There were several fishermen on the water and on the lakeside dock. They told me they catch bass and catfish at this 300-acre lake. The trail around the lake would be good for birders because I spotted ducks, hawks and wood-peckers.

North Bend State Park would be good for kids because they have playgrounds, mini-golf and an outdoor swimming pool(closed when I visited in October, but looked really nice).

Near Perfect Campground

We went in late October and we arrived fairly late in the day and to our surprise someone was in the store when we got there. Campground was in great shape, the RV lots were well maintained and all the asphalt seems to have been redone recently. The bathrooms were clean and heated to a comfortable level. Showers had great pressure as well. The spots were well spaced out and pretty spacious, the site we were in had electric hookup for 50a/30a/20a but no water at the site but there was water near the bathroom area. Nice big fire pit in the center area for groups.

OVERPRICED

Maybe I am not used to KOA prices but $52 a night for a FHU seems high! The owners were nice and accommodating! The site while somewhat level was gravel and wet from day’s storm (poor drainage) ! I booked from afar and was not able to find other campgrounds near Charleston, WV.

Great State Park!

We stayed here for one night on our way back north. We got the last site available and it was pretty decent. Site 10 across from the bathhouse. The site was very level, as were most sites. Many have full hookups and several are right along the creek. The waterfalls are a short walk from the campground. Firewood is available and they deliver it to your site. The bundles are quite generous in size. We will definitely stop here again.

Kumbrabow State Forest

Stayed: 10/12/19

Site: 7 (Non-electric)

Price: $16

Pros: Quiet, Small, Creek, Snowshoe DH Park

Cons: Lengthy dirt road drive to get there, No cell coverage or Wi-Fi, 2 mile drive to bath house

Secret campsites along river!

We stayed one night at Cranberry Campground during Columbus Day weekend, it was busier than the other two campgrounds (Big Rock and Bishop Knob) and was primarily occupied by RV campers who tended to park nearest the toilets.  We found a good tucked in site (#27) that was close to the water pump and was surrounded by the woods.  The two walk-up site (#23 + #24) were also tucked away nicely and were not far at all from where a car would park, I would suggest this if you needed two sites and wanted some privacy.  $10 a night, has picnic table, water pump, toilets, and lantern thingy.  This campground was close enough to the river but the sites are not directly on the river side. 

With RVers comes generators and happily they complied with the 10pm - 6am quiet times.  However, my style of camping is back country seclusion accessible by car (and a picnic table and a water pump), I know I'm ridiculous.  So we moved the next day to an empty 5-site campground ($5 a night) right on the river and between Big Rock and Cranberry campgrounds.  Highly recommend the campsites along the river!  Access to fishing is directly from your campsite, the water sounds so nice at night, and I love the river side exploring.  

Additional bonus for those visiting in the fall is the periodic apple tree.  We had one right next to our site and happily snacked on a few.  

Monogahela- Gauley Ranger District… 

I found all three campgrounds easy to find and the signage from Forest Road 76 was suffiecient. We rarely had GPS on the back roads and mountain area in WV so be sure to print directions jic. Had service in Richwood though, which I recommend checking out if you have a rainy day or you need last minute camping supplies. They have an outfitter, Four Seasons Outfitter, that we purchased our firewood from(it rained so"dead and down" wasn't gonna help). They might sell fishing license too but we bought our fishing licenses from a different outfitter in Marlinton, WV. Marlinton is also a good pit stop. 

This area of Monogahela was lovely, there were tons of great spots along the Cranberry River to explore. We heard and/or saw some wildlife/signs of wild life. No bears which is good I guess, we were careful not to attract them to our campsite. I was surprised not to see or be visited by a ranger while were at Monogahela (two nights) especially given that it was a holiday weekend.

Quiet on Columbus Day Weekend

Bishop Knob Specific…

Visited the camp site Columbus Day weekend and it was empty but for one RV camper.  I imagine this site is a good back up if the Big Rock, Cranberry Campgrounds are full or you just wanted a spot that was quieter.   Very well kept and had all the basics, water, toilet, picnic table, lantern hook, and fire pit.  

The second loop was closed (presumably for the rest of the fall/winter season). The Monogahela National Forest website lists there being fishing nearby, but as far as i could tell you still have to drive to get to the water.  We wanted to fish off our campsite so we did not stay over night at Bishop Knob.

Monogahela - Gauley Ranger District… 

I found all three campgrounds easy to find and the signage from Forest Road 76 was suffiecient.  We rarely had GPS on the back roads and mountain area in WV so be sure to print directions jic.  Had service in Richwood though, which I recommend checking out if you have a rainy day or you need last minute camping supplies.  They have an outfitter, Four Seasons Outfitter, that we purchased our firewood from (it rained so "dead and down" wasn't gonna help).  They might sell fishing license too but we bought our fishing licenses from a different outfitter in Marlinton, WV.  Marlinton is also a good pit stop.   

This area of Monogahela was lovely, there were tons of great spots along the Cranberry River to explore.  We heard and/or saw some wildlife/signs of wild life.  No bears which is good I guess, we were careful not to attract them to our campsite.  I was surprised not to see or be visited by a ranger while were at Monogahela (two nights) especially given that it was a holiday weekend.

Hidden gem

This tiny campground in the Monongahela National Forest was such a fun find! There are less than 30 sites and most have a good bit of privacy. There is one building with showers and flush toilets near the entrance, and several outhouse style toilets scattered around. My kids didn't love those so we took a lot of trips down to the bathroom building. The 1.5 mile loop trail was great and just challenging enough to be fun. The campground and trail are filled with beautiful mountain laurel. The hosts were friendly and available and the whole place seemed to be well maintained. Elkins is only a few minutes away if you need groceries or supplies. We had a great time and would definitely come back!

Good calm place

Great Campground some spots a little tight for bigger camper we have a 30’ but we were okay. Very quiet nice rangers and very helpful.

campground is really nice, as long as the locals are'nt in force,,,

really nice campground as long as the local crowd has'nt taken over. been there several times and left early as did other families due the disruptive nonsense of a few. if not for that, very nice campground

Very friendly! Wooded areas. Close to town with great art & music

Great time once again!!!  The views ❤️

Spent the day in Thomas looking at local art & antiques.  The evening in Davis eating at hellbender burritos.  Hiked some cool trails in the park and to see the falls.  I love this part of our beautiful state!  Blackwater falls SP campground is a central location to some of the best of our state. Seneca rocks, caverns, smokehole caverns and NRock adventures only 45 mins away.  Took a canopy tour with Nrocks before camping.  Awesome!!!!!

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Campground is nice and quiet no cell service so dont be shocked, but that makes it that much better. Park was clean park ranger and staff were nice!

Great as a stopover campground

I camp in my tent so i chose a smaller, secluded site close to the restrooms.  The restrooms were very clean and easily accessible.  I went during the week and the campground was very quiet. The owner was very nice.

Just Beautiful ‼️

The Holly River runs clear through the Park, right beside a good many of the of the sites and hanging a hammock and listening to the water, can’t be beat! The staff/Rangers are so wonderful! A small restaurant, gift shop, pool, waterfalls, cabins, trails, it is so calming and relaxing! Love it!

Peaceful

Very peaceful website. No shade and campsites are close but the setup is great.