The best TENT SITES camping near
Bernardstown , WEST VIRGINIA

267 Reviews101 Campgrounds

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Most Recent Bernardstown Camping Reviews
Great spot

Great dispersed camping area. Camped here in winter and just pulled into the first designated spot. There was snow but the fire pit was easy to dig out. Very quiet in late December and the sound of the creek was really peaceful.

The host was great

The bedroom water had a lot of iron in it. The tent sites are far from rest rooms. It's a bit muddy win it rains

Nice!

Super friendly camp host. He met us and drove us to the camp park because it was so dark. Spacious sites, and he is making amazing improvements to the park. Beautiful river setting.

Beautiful creek and waterfalls backpacking

The campground is on the Seneca Creek Trail in a meadow area along the Seneca Creek. Campsites are situated in and around the meadow with multiple trail junctions near by. Campsites are primitive (flat area for a tent and basic rock fire pit) for backpackers hiking in the Spruce Knob Recreational Area. I stayed there one night hiking down the Seneca Creek Trail. The trail has various campsites throughout the length of the trail (not just at Judy Springs) and some good fly fishing spots (saw trout running up rapids multiple times).

Second campsite was about 50 meters south of the the Seneca Creek Upper Falls (location near: 38° 46' 2.5932'' N 79° / 30' 27.1764'' W). This campsite also had two other falls direct next to it. This was an incredibly beautiful campsite. Third night, stayed at a campsite 0.75 miles from the trailhead parking lot (near: 38° 43' 7.0104'' N 79° 32' 41.1612'' W).

Nice quiet camp ground..

We didn't have reservations but the manager told us to text him when we arrived after hours Charge was per person not per site, but reasonable at $15. This seams to be common practice in the area. No electric or water at site but bathhouse with showers. Mostly tent sites in wooded area Our visit was the first full weekend I. November and many other campgrounds were closed for the winter.

Not too impressed

Just stayed here for one night with our 5th wheel when traveling home. I wasn’t too impressed. I thought it was expensive. The site was difficult to back into because everything was so narrow. I like to have a little bit of space when camping, but there were tent campers all around us. My surgeguard shut off the power in the evening due to high voltage. It was showing 137 volts at one time. I was not impressed and most likely won’t be back.

I'm giving it 5 stars but it was a disappointment

I'm sure this is an amazing campsite, but it was a little to rustic for my liking. There is no cell service within 30 miles, so for an outsider who doesn't know the area, it was difficult to find the campsite. You also better bring everything you need beforehand. There are no grocery stores anywhere near the campsite and we didn't have any food with us. The firewood is unbundled and there are no showers. We ended up not staying here because we were not prepared. It is nice that each campsite has a stone "oven" as a fire pit and a trash can on site.

Nice Area

Very nice area several nice spot right along the creek. Areas are spread out and private. Nice spot to relax and escape along creek. Drive back is well maintained dirt road.

Hidden Gem--Unplug and Unwind

This was my first visit to Kumbrabow State Forest, but not my last!
   
     Kumbrabow State Forest offers lots of great trails, rustic cabins, and a primitive campground. This historic recreation area, carved into this 9,500-acre forest by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930’s, is a wonderful place to unplug and unwind. It’s located at 3,000 feet above sea level on the western edge of the Allegheny Highlands, so it’s the highest state forest in West Virginia.
     I stayed in space #7, located next to Mill Creek, where I enjoyed the relaxing sound of this gurgling stream all night long. Each camping spot has a picnic table, fire ring and lantern holder. There are pit toilets and a pump for fresh spring water in the campground. Two-miles down the road, there’s a bathhouse next to the Kumbrabow forest headquarters.
     If you hike the 2-mile Potato Hole Trail, you'll arrive at the top of Rich Mountain and an overlook with a fantastic view. You can also park at the Kumbrabow gun range and hike the longer, but less strenuous, Rich Mountain Fire Trail which intersects with the Potato Hole Trail.
     Make sure you check out Mills Creek Falls and admire the really cool CCC-built rustic cabins. The cabins don’t have water or electricity, but offer gas lights, gas refrigerator, fully-equipped kitchen, wood fireplace, and outside grill and firepit. My 99-year old mom and her siblings stayed here for their "sister parties" years ago and loved the cabins at Kumbrabow.
     I suggest a side trip to the Highland Scenic Highway where you can admire the Falls of Hills Creek, Cranberry Glades, and colorful foliage during the fall season.

Large Family-Friendly Campground

     Bulltown Campground offers a couple hundred spaces, multiple playgrounds, and clean restrooms on the edge of Burnsville Lake, managed by the U-S Army Corps of Engineers. This area is popular for camping, boating, swimming, hiking, and hunting during the deer season.
     It was a beautiful place to camp in the month of October with the fall leaf colors reflected on the surface of the lake. I imagine it could be a bit of zoo during the peak summer months because nearly ever camper in the off-season arrived in a sizeable RV with dogs, children or both.
     Loop A and B are closed in the off-season and all other spaces are first-come, first serve. There’s a self-serve kiosk where you check-in and pay with cash or check. The bulletin board was loaded with lots of helpful posts, including a “boil water” warning on the night I was there.
     I was camping in my van and found a nice shady spot next to Burnsville Lake where I easily dropped my kayak into the water for a peaceful paddle. I was parked next to a group of hunters who bagged a couple of does during the bow season. I imagine the gun season could get a bit noisy. Wear orange, or bright colors if you’re hiking outside the “safety zone” during WV’s hunting season .  The 2020 bow season runs from September 26th to December 31st. The buck firearm season runs from November 23rd to December 6th.
     I particularly enjoyed visiting the nearby Bulltown Historic District, which is the location of a Civil Battle War battle where Confederate and Union soldiers fought to control a critical supply route, including a covered bridge over the Little Kanawha River. You can check out historic structures on the site and hike to the top of the hill where the Union soldiers ultimately withstood the Confederate attack. Pre-covid, there was a reenactment of the battle every other October. I picked up a map for the Weston and Gauley Bridge Turnpike Trail, but found the more remote sections of the trail poorly marked. I didn’t see any official parking lots or trail markers, but I did see a lot of “private property” signs, so I was hesitant to accidentally trespass on a local landowner’s property. I’m guessing some of the access points may have been wiped out by pipeline construction… another reason not to anger the locals who may not be happy with this “invasion.”