The best BOAT IN camping near
Bernardstown , WEST VIRGINIA

137 Reviews25 Campgrounds

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Most Recent Bernardstown Camping Reviews
Nice!

Super friendly camp host. He met us and drove us to the camp park because it was so dark. Spacious sites, and he is making amazing improvements to the park. Beautiful river setting.

Not too impressed

Just stayed here for one night with our 5th wheel when traveling home. I wasn’t too impressed. I thought it was expensive. The site was difficult to back into because everything was so narrow. I like to have a little bit of space when camping, but there were tent campers all around us. My surgeguard shut off the power in the evening due to high voltage. It was showing 137 volts at one time. I was not impressed and most likely won’t be back.

I'm giving it 5 stars but it was a disappointment

I'm sure this is an amazing campsite, but it was a little to rustic for my liking. There is no cell service within 30 miles, so for an outsider who doesn't know the area, it was difficult to find the campsite. You also better bring everything you need beforehand. There are no grocery stores anywhere near the campsite and we didn't have any food with us. The firewood is unbundled and there are no showers. We ended up not staying here because we were not prepared. It is nice that each campsite has a stone "oven" as a fire pit and a trash can on site.

Large Family-Friendly Campground

     Bulltown Campground offers a couple hundred spaces, multiple playgrounds, and clean restrooms on the edge of Burnsville Lake, managed by the U-S Army Corps of Engineers. This area is popular for camping, boating, swimming, hiking, and hunting during the deer season.
     It was a beautiful place to camp in the month of October with the fall leaf colors reflected on the surface of the lake. I imagine it could be a bit of zoo during the peak summer months because nearly ever camper in the off-season arrived in a sizeable RV with dogs, children or both.
     Loop A and B are closed in the off-season and all other spaces are first-come, first serve. There’s a self-serve kiosk where you check-in and pay with cash or check. The bulletin board was loaded with lots of helpful posts, including a “boil water” warning on the night I was there.
     I was camping in my van and found a nice shady spot next to Burnsville Lake where I easily dropped my kayak into the water for a peaceful paddle. I was parked next to a group of hunters who bagged a couple of does during the bow season. I imagine the gun season could get a bit noisy. Wear orange, or bright colors if you’re hiking outside the “safety zone” during WV’s hunting season .  The 2020 bow season runs from September 26th to December 31st. The buck firearm season runs from November 23rd to December 6th.
     I particularly enjoyed visiting the nearby Bulltown Historic District, which is the location of a Civil Battle War battle where Confederate and Union soldiers fought to control a critical supply route, including a covered bridge over the Little Kanawha River. You can check out historic structures on the site and hike to the top of the hill where the Union soldiers ultimately withstood the Confederate attack. Pre-covid, there was a reenactment of the battle every other October. I picked up a map for the Weston and Gauley Bridge Turnpike Trail, but found the more remote sections of the trail poorly marked. I didn’t see any official parking lots or trail markers, but I did see a lot of “private property” signs, so I was hesitant to accidentally trespass on a local landowner’s property. I’m guessing some of the access points may have been wiped out by pipeline construction… another reason not to anger the locals who may not be happy with this “invasion.”

Deep Woods Feel

Site 4 (non-electric) July 28-31, 2020 Average Daily Temp: 89 Average Nightly Temp: 78 One of the best when it comes to size of site, privacy, and remote feel. Firewood is available for small fee. Table, fire pit, and comfortable pad. Encountered 19 deer, 1 bear, and several other small creatures. Short drive or hike to Lake with boat rentals and fishing. Campground is only 10 sites with plenty of canopy for shade. One of my favorite spots to date.

Quit and very Covid specious

My parents took me and my sister to Audra every summer and wks at a time and camping in a tent,it was the best memories i have as a child and yes im now 42,fulltime grandma of 4yr old axel w austism, i have worked m.j y butt off w him 2yrs straight to get his fits calmed down..yes he has had 1since last oct and that is because i figured out what was triggering them but so proud of him..i him..I wanted to take grandson sonewhere where ppl are friendly and say hi to axel where felt cummy and not get upset and hide…my neice  ended uo going last mth,she invited us up to test axel out because this b a huge thing for him to do..oh my Aurda was still beautiful, clean, ppl so nice,there was no camp site available so we stayed till 7pm and went home..def a place to take kids w disabilities, ppl understand, do not stare and its alot of fun for kids,quit,gorgeous place to camp..wish they had a site open and it be kool to win a few days of camping..

Easy Access, Great River Location

GREENBRIER RIVER TRAIL MILE POST 9.5 PRIMITIVE CAMPSITE, KEISTER, WV

Greenbrier River Trail Primitive Campsite at Mile Post 9.5 is close enough to North Caldwell, WV…the GBT Southern Terminus…that you could make a quick journey north from the parking area for an exceptional night of camping.

Traveling West Virginia's Greenbrier River Trail from it's Northern Terminus at Cass Railroad, Stumptown to it's Southern Terminus in North Caldwell has created a thirst that can only be slaked by multiple future returns. What a fantastic trail!

The Shelter is so new its not even noted on any but the newest Trail Map. It appears that individuals or families have either constructed or donated for the construction of both shelters and several protected bench areas. The Dale McCutcheon Shelter was so clean and comfortable, it's hard to call this primitive camping. Note: All campsites on the Greenbrier River Trail are first come-first served…no reservations. Backstory on McCutcheon Shelter: https://www.wvnstv.com/news/west-virginia-news/greenbrier-county/new-shelters-built-along-greenbrier-river-trail/

PROS:

  • Adirondock Style Shelter (New)
  • Raised Tent pads
  • Picnic Tables
  • Metal Fire Rings
  • Large, clean Pit Latrine
  • Hand pump well water
  • Metal Bear Proof Trash Receptacle
  • Free
  • No Cell Service
  • Great Swimming Rock Trail South

CONS:

  • No Cell Service
  • Hand pump well water was inoperable during our late June 2020 visit

NEARBY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • The Greenbrier Resort
  • The Wild Bean - Lewisburg (restaurant)
  • Seneca Forest/State Park
  • Snowshoe Mountain Resort
  • Cass Railroad
  • Spruce Knob
  • Seneca Rocks

In late June 2020, weather along The Greenbrier River Trail was cooler, with late afternoon/early evening rain showers. Only the last day did we enjoy warmer weather with blue skies. Which made the allure of a nearby swimming rock a great temptation. Several mall cascades lined the West side of the trail, which is ordinarily the side cut from the mountain for the railway. 

With a few short miles until the journey ends at the Southern Terminus…we slowed our paced and stopped more frequently to enjoy all the sights and sounds.  

Trail conditions got soft and muddy after the previous night's deluge through the more heavily wooded areas, once the trail was exposed to constant sun, it dried quickly. Blow-down did slow us down a few times. Interesting note: This campsite area is a relocation of one destroyed by the heavy rains and buried by landslide of 2016. The Greenbrier Trail itself travels between the Greenbrier River and was, in many places, hewn from the mountainside. It is these areas where heavy rains soften the soil and old growth trees dislodge and cause trail blockages and/or mudslides. Oftentimes, when bicycling, one keeps his eyes forward to the trail/road in front of them…but if you gaze around you on this trail…there is much to see all around and often above!

Overall, it is a must-do…and I can't wait to ride the Greenbrier River Trail again!

Riverfront Property needs camper!

Campground Review: Greenbrier River Trail Mile Post 28.5 Primitive Campsite…(Between Rorer and Renick, WV)

Bikepacking West Virginia's Greenbrier River Trail is a delightfully peaceful adventure! If you enjoy bicycling, camping and wilderness…then you this trail is for you. Actually, you can replace "bicycling" with horseback, backpacking, XC skiing. In fact, with a keen eye, you could paddle the Greenbrier River and enjoy these campsites.

These primitive campsites are free, first come-first served and cannot be reached by motor vehicle. The campsites that dot the Greenbrier River Trail are meticulously maintained by State Park employees and are in well thought out locations.

Mile Post 28.5 Primitive Campsite, as all campsites are linear along the Trail and usually positioned between the Trail and the Greenbrier River…with access to the River. This campsite is stretched out a good distance and though not listed on some Trail maps…it does have an Adirondock style shelter near the southernmost tent pad in a partly wooded area. The tent pad to the north of this area is in an open grassy area with tranquil long views of the river. Swimming and fishing are permitted in the Greenbrier River (Fishing: if you have a WV Fishing License). In late June, temperatures were still quite cool, so while the river looked inviting, we did not take the plunge.

Late afternoon showers soaked the three groups of bikepackers that set up camp at Mile Post 28.5 for the night. So being the first to claim the Shelter is a coveted position.

PROS:

  • Adirondock Style Shelter
  • Raised Tent pads (2)
  • Picnic Tables
  • Fire Pits w/grate
  • Large Pit Latrines
  • Bearproof Trash receptacle
  • Hand-pump well water
  • Quiet & Peaceful
  • No cell service

CONS:

  • No cell service

Nearby Attractions:

  • Droop Mountain Battlefield SP
  • Snowshoe Mountain Resort
  • Cass Railroad
  • Seneca Rocks
  • Spruce Knob (WV Highest Elevation)
  • Seneca Forest (Thorny Mountain Fire Tower)
  • The Greenbrier Resort

HIGHLIGHTS: 

  • Traveling through Droop Mountain Tunnel
  • Traveling over the nearly 100 year old steel RR bridges

Traveling the Greenbrier River Trail allows the traveler to be sent back in time…passing through old Railroad towns, seeing old Railroad buildings, water towers offers a glimpse backwards.

Heavy rainstorms brought down numerous trees across the GRT during our trip…but the State Park  employees worked diligently and feverishly to clear the trail. At one location, employees graciously offered to assist us haul our bikes over the multiple downed trees as they worked to clear them.

It is easy to see how the Greenbrier River Trail made Backpacker Magazine's Top Ten hiking trails in North America…surrounded by wild and often very remote wilderness, abundant wildlife, a century old trail, a picturesque river, great camping…ticks all the boxes!

All you need for a great time, nothing more and nothing less!

Greenbrier River Trail Milepost 63.8 Primitive Campsite, Located between Clover Lick and Clawson, WV (south of Sharp's Tunnel)

The Greenbrier River Trail is one of the most beautiful and often most remote trail I have had the privilege of bikepacking. If you aren't familiar with camping in West Virginia, you are in for a treat. The WV State Park system is fantastic and the State Park employees take incredible pride in keeping all their parks beautifully maintained despite poor budgets to work with. 

GRT MP 63.8 Primitive Campsite is close to 17 miles south of the Cass Railroad Station. Trail conditions were wonderful, typical Railroad ballast, crushed gravel…at times it was wide like they recently removed the track, and other sections grass has grown down the middle to make it two track. All flat with a gentle one percent downhill grade from Stumptown to North Caldwell. Frankly, it wasn't discernible…but I'll take it.

Wildlife and songbirds were abundant and as shocked to see you as you were them. Oftentimes, the deer would run the trail ahead of you for 200 yards before cutting off onto their sidetrail.

The trail itself is recorded at differing lengths depending on what you read, but we started at MP 80…at Cass Railroad Station…traveling south to North Caldwell.

PROS:

  • Free camping(First come, first served) 
  • Newer Adirondock Style Shelter 
  • Newer Large/Clean/Stocked Pit Latrine 
  • Raised Tent pad(pea gravel) 
  • Cold well water- Hand pump 
  • Metal Fire Ring 
  • No Cell Service 

CONS: 

  • No Cell Service 

NEARBY HIGHLIGHTS: 

  • Cass Railroad Station 
  • Snowshoe Mountain Ski Resort 
  • Seneca Forest (**Thorny Mountain Fire Tower)
  • Seneca Rocks
  •  Spruce Knob(WV Highest Elevation) 
  • Green Bank Observatory 
  • The Greenbrier Resort

*Note in the video, I initially thought the steel containers were bear proof storage, but I was incorrect and they are bear proof trash receptacles. 

This is bear country, so we kept all our food items and toiletries in a bear cannister during our trip. We did not experience any encounters or sightings, but fellow cyclists traveling in the same direction, observed a juvenile bear during the day along the trail.

In fact, WV has an abundant wildlife population and it is evident along the Greenbrier River Trail, which set this trail apart from other bikepacking trails I've traveled.

You will see in a couple photos that a certain slithering resident was unwilling to give up his claim on this Adirondack Shelter, we attempted to dissuade him, we even gently relocated him, but he was neither afraid of our presence nor was he about to pass up a roof over his head. So we acquiesced and moved to the raised tent pad 100' down the trail. He was a very curious character.

In June, you can anticipate random, short afternoon or evening cloudbursts…but they can be gully-washers. Nights were cool and most mornings I wore a long-sleeve Merino shirt.

Riding and camping along the picture-perfect Greenbrier River offers fantastic views and opportunities to cool off…bring your swimwear.

Private, Primitive, and Pleasant

GREENBRIER RIVER TRAIL MILEPOST 69.6 PRIMITIVE CAMPING AREA, Clover Lick, WV

The Greenbrier River Trail is a converted C&O Railway that travels 80 miles from Cass Railroad Station, Stumptown, WV to North Caldwell, WV. This Rails-to-Trails is wonderfully maintained by WV State Parks and was featured in Backpacker Magazine as one of the top 10 hiking trails in the country. This former railbed would be considered flat by most, but there is a 1% downhill grade from the Northern Terminus in Stumptown to its Southern Terminus in North Caldwell.

There are plenty of these Primitive Camping Areas along the trail to make this a "must-do" trail. The trail is made primarily of the old Railway ballast and a finer pea gravel most of the trail…but there are some overgrown grassy two-track and some muddy sections as well.  This is called "Wet Virginia" for good reason…pack a rain jacket.

The trail itself is recorded at differing lengths depending on what you read, but we started at MP 80…at Cass Railroad Station. 

PROS:

  • Free camping (First come, first served)
  • Newer Adirondock Style Shelter
  • Newer Large/Clean/Stocked Pit Latrine
  • Raised Tent pad (pea gravel)
  • Cold well water - Hand pump
  • Metal Fire Ring
  • No Cell Service

CONS:

  • No Cell Service

NEARBY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Cass Railroad Station
  • Snowshoe Mountain Ski Resort
  • Seneca Forest
  • Seneca Rocks
  • Spruce Knob (WV Highest Elevation)
  • Green Bank Observatory
  • The Greenbrier Resort

The Greenbrier River Trail is a delightful bikepacking excursion.  Very doable for all ages. I'd recommend road bicycles with tires no narrower than 700x32 or mountain bikes. Because of the wetter climate, there were soggy sections that would cause difficulty for thin tires, especially when laden with panniers.

The MP 69.6 Camping Area is along the Greenbrier River, so camping along it affords great wildlife viewing at dawn and dusk when the animals head to the water to drink. The amount of wildlife we saw throughout the day was incredible while biking the trail. Mostly deer, rabbit, chipmunks and Eastern Box Turtles sharing the trail…but we did see a few turkey, fox and bobcat. An elderly fellow cyclist, sharing the camping area, saw a juvenile black bear. The Greenbrier River Trail travels through Watoga State Park, Seneca State Forest and the Monongahela National Forest

The Greenbrier River Trail is a mutli-use trail, so there is potential to see bicyclists, walkers, hikers, horseback and in the winter, XC skiers. Near towns we encountered very polite and pleasant walkers and cyclists enjoying the trail…but away from the towns it was very quiet, peaceful and remote.

NOTE: If you choose to ride the Greenbrier River Trail from Stumptown to North Caldwell or the opposite direction…unless you are going to ride back the way you came, you will need to have someone shuttle your vehicle. I used Chuck Workman, owner of Appalachian Sports in Marlinsburg to shuttle my vehicle to the Southern Terminus…Oscar from Cass Railroad Station shared that useful information!