the dyrt
THE BEST CAMPING IN
New Mexico
389 Reviews 482 Campgrounds

From the vast Chihuahuan Desert to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico has a wealth of opportunities to get outside and explore. For outdoor adventurers, there’s skiing in Taos, whitewater rafting on the Rio Grande, and plenty of hiking, from the Southern Rockies to dusty desert canyons. That’s what makes camping in New Mexico such a varied and fulfilling experience.

Carlsbad Caverns provides ample opportunities to hike, explore, learn about desert wildlife, even appreciate a few thousand Mexican free-tail bats take flight. They swarm out of the cave every night at dust for an audience that often numbers in the hundreds. It’s a perfect excuse to stick around the park after dark and do some camping in New Mexico.

Of course, the only camping available within Carlsbad Caverns National Park is backcountry camping, so come prepared to Leave No Trace. Keep in mind that the desert landscape is often dry, so fire bans, even some backcountry cooking bans, are frequently in effect in the drier months. On the upside, backcountry camping permits are free and you can grab one at the visitor center when you arrive.

Visit White Sands National Monument for an unmatched, natural experience. Acres upon acres of white gypsum dunes stretch into the distance, offering hours of diversion, be it hiking across the dunes or sledding down them. If you forgot your sled, don’t worry, you can pick one up in the gift shop. Just be sure to enjoy these activities early in the morning or late in the evening during the summer months; it gets hot in the desert during midday!

As for camping in White Sands, it’s backcountry camping or nothing and sites require a short hike through the dunes. You’ll be camping on the gypsum, surrounded by shifting white hills, dark night skies up above, and no other campers in sight. It’s definitely a unique experience. Permits are $3.00 per person and can be picked up at the visitor center.

Wherever your adventures take you in the Land of Enchantment, get out there and let The Dyrt help you locate the best camping in New Mexico.

Retrieving Results
EXPLORE NEW MEXICO
Recent Reviews in New Mexico
Excellent close to home campground

The lake is way down but the entire park is well maintained. Campsites are level and clean. Shower house at Lions loop is closed as is the dump station but the rr and dump at the cove area is very close

Great campground with amazing water and mountain views!!

This is a great spacious campground in the Carson National forest near the Questa ranger station. It is one of the bigger sites with quite a few amenities and many options for sites. There are two small lakes and the river running through the campground that make for good fishing. Plus there are a few hiking trails connected to this park which is super convient!

They have vault style restrooms and a few wash stations with potable water. This camp is located between Questa and Red River where you can find groceries or resturants. A great place to camp with a lot to offer and amazing views!!!

Great campground with wonderful water and mountain views!!

This is a great spacious campground in the Carson National forest near the Questa ranger station. It is one of the bigger sites with quite a few amenities and many options for sites. There are two small lakes and the river running through the campground that make for good fishing. Plus there are a few hiking trails connected to this park which is super convient!

They have vault style restrooms and a few wash stations with potable water. This camp is located between Questa and Red River where you can find groceries or resturants. A great place to camp with a lot to offer and amazing views!!!

AMAZING!!!

This campground is by far my favorite of the ones on the Questa side of the Carson National Forest, but be advised it is only a day use campground.

There is an amazing lake you can fish at and some great hiking trails around the back of the lake. There are campsites, but they are not by reservation and are only for day use. There a vault toilets and trash cans.

Be advised there is not a lot of parking, and even in the off season it is a popular place. It is located pretty close the Questa ranger station if you need any information on fishing or surrounding campgrounds!

Make sure you put this spot on your list from some fishing and lazy hammocking!

Smaller campground along road in Carson National Forest.

This is small campground near the Questa Ranger station in the Carson National forest. There are not many amenities and the campground is located right off the side of the road so there is a lot of road noise.It in not my favorite campground because you are not as close to the trailheads as many of the others, but if it is your only option during peak season it would do.

This park is located between Red River and Questa, so if you are in need of groceries or hot food, it is not far down the road. The Questa ranger station down the road has firewood, but not much else.

This campground has valt toilets, fire rings and picnic tables, plus a communal bear bin for food. Steep mountains line one side and the road the opposite, so you will have to either drive or walk the road to get to hiking trails.

Beautiful spot inside Carson National Forest!

I love this campsite. It is definitely one of my favorites on the Questa side of the Carson National forest. The views here are breathtaking and the sound of the river drowns out the noise from the road which is fairly close. The sites are are very nice and spacious with a grill pit and a huge circular fire pit.

The bathrooms are simple vault toilets and there is a small wash station. There are plenty of potable water spots and the rangers here are always helpful.

On one side you have the amazing views of the mountains and the other is just beautiful forest with the river running along side. There are a few trailheads towards the back of the campground with awesome trails. Plus this campground is in between the amazing Red River ski resort and Questa. Red River has some great restaurants including a local brewery that is my personal favorite. They also have a small market, or you could head into Questa or Taos for full size grocery stores.

One of the smaller campgrounds in Carson National Forest

This is a very small campground in the Carson National Forest near the Questa Ranger station. There are very little amenities. There is no potable water or bathrooms, but there are bear bins, picnic tables and small fire rings with a grill grate.

This campground is located right off the side of the road and so are the actual campsites. This makes for quite a bit of noise from the road. If you are planning to stay at the Carson National forest I would advise you look at some of the other sites just down the road. This would be more of like an overflow option.

I loved the place, very comfy and secluded.

Any true camper would adore the place.

Lovely

Gallo Campground is the only campground in Chaco Canyon National Park so reserving ahead of time or getting there earlier in the day depending on the season are very important. The park is very remote so it's a long drive on a potentially very rough road to get in but once you're there the route is well worth the visit.

I visited on a Wednesday night in mid October. The campground had filled up by about 2pm Wednesday and but was full by about 11am on Thursday.

There is currently no potable water at the campground but water is available at the Visitors Center a short drive down the road. There are however flushing toilets and running water in the bathrooms. The campsites each have a picnic table and fire pit. I thought the set up of the tent only area was interesting. There is a parking lot area with sites surrounding it on three sides. The set up allows for privacy between the sites which are nestled in among the rocks and plants as well as ruins!

I wish I had spent more time in Chaco Canyon exploring the sites, hiking, and going on tours. The daily tours and ranger talks provide more insight into the canyon's history than you can get with the self guided booklets.

Pretty Nice, No Water

The Gallo Campground is the only campground in Chaco Canyon National Park so reserving ahead of time or getting there earlier in the day depending on the season are very important. The park is very remote so it's a long drive on a potentially very rough road to get in but once you're there the route is well worth the visit.

I visited on a Wednesday night in mid October. The campground had filled up by about 2pm Wednesday and but was full by about 11am on Thursday.

There is currently no potable water at the campground but water is available at the Visitors Center a short drive down the road. There are however flushing toilets and running water in the bathrooms. The campsites each have a picnic table and fire pit. I thought the set up of the tent only area was interesting. There is a parking lot area with sites surrounding it on three sides. The set up allows for privacy between the sites which are nestled in among the rocks and plants.

I wish I had spent more time in Chaco Canyon exploring the sites, hiking, and going on tours. The daily tours and ranger talks provide more insight into the canyon's history than you can get with the self guided booklets.

Rocky Shorelines And Hard Packed Campsites

I stopped in this camp when taking a brief trip through Fort Sumner on the way back to Texas from Las Vegas. The town of Fort Sumner itself is known for its Billy The Kidd presence and there are many things to do in the area in regard to that which are interesting. But just as much as I wanted to check that out, I wanted to check out another unique spot in New Mexico to stay the night and this campsite seemed to be one of the closest.

I liked this because there were both tent and RV sites, so naturally I felt a bit more at home than I would have it had ben a park which focuses daily on RVs and leaves tents as an after thought.

The lake itself wasn't my favorite lake of New Mexico, though it seemed large everything around it was pretty dry. The banks were more of a gravel than a beach and some of the areas were rocky with larger boulders making it a little more difficult to find a recreational place to just enjoy the water. I definitely needed water shoes to get into or near the water.

I chose a primitive site although they do have some which have connections, my reason for selecting this site was its location which I thought would have a great view of the sunrise and the lake, unfortunately it ended up raining the morning so there was no beautiful sunrise. But for only $8 I couldn't really complain especially since I was able to take advantage of the lake a bit the evening before.

I noticed the lake was typically of any lake with a lot of the activities of the park centering around it, however they also had a few hiking trails, a small visitor center to check out a little light information about the location and outdoor education programs which were mostly held on weekends.

It wasn't really that busy when I was there on the weekday I passed through and camp felt pretty quiet throughout the duration of my stay.

Restrooms located near me were vault style but they did have a bathroom with running water and showers as well, depending on where you elect to stay you will be nearby some kind of accommodations. My site being primitive was really primitive and had no table or fire ring, but I did notice for $10 you could have both just a little distance from where my site was located. I personally didn't need either when staying.

TIPS:

  • Check into the park office for minor supplies, anything bigger you will need to travel Into town where there are numerous stores.

  • When in the area make sure to stop in at the Billy The Kidd Museum and Bosque Redondo Park both are staples of the area and contain a lot of history which will tell the story of New Mexico past in some of the most infamous ways.

Clean, beautifully kept, covered tables with wind breaker wall

Such a nice place. Park ranger is friendly. Showers clean and well kept. Pullmthrymu sites, water views. $14.00 day for full hook ups! Bargain!

Road Trip Route 66

Nice RV Campground along Route 66. Good rates and a lot of amenities

Pretty Nice little spot

Found this Campground to be pretty nice overall! Mainly RV's and Campers, in fact I didn't see a single tent or tent site during our stay. The Lots are fairly close together and all have a little covered picnic table area next to the drive through RV slots. Bathrooms and showers worked just fine, though my girlfriend said the womens shower would turn itself off every 30 seconds or so (the mens worked just fine).

It's about 20 minutes north of albuquerque which is nice since you're far enough away to be out of the hustle and bustle but close enough to explore the city. We went for the Hot Air Balloon Fiesta and we could see the balloons from the campgrounds early in the morning.

There's also a Bad Ass Coffee down the street which is one of my favorites!

Beautiful area but terribly maintained!

This could be a 5 but a 2 is all that I can muster. They shut off ALL water on October first and fail to put that into the reservation site or make it clear at the self pay. The gate closes at 5PM after Oct 1 also. NO CODE to re-enter! The folks that run this place need to powwow with their other State Park counterparts to make major improvements. The vault toilet had not been maintained since 8/26/18. This was October 5th…. The views and individual shelters are great. Please someone fix this place up. It could be so much more.

Needs Some Work

There are two campground I found in the area, this one and one almost directly across from it. I checked out each on my way to the tent rocks and ended up settling on the other.

WHY? This one is like the red headed stepchild that everyone knows is there but doesn't want to deal with it seems. I think what happened is the other was constructed after this one and because of that this one was neglected instead of maintained.

Was it all bad? No. But was it as nice as the other, NOPE!

I honestly think that if there was a little maintenance to this one I would have enjoyed it a bit more. I liked the views from this side a bit more and they seemed a bit more vegetative overall. But that was also the problem, it looked like no one had maintained the sites and they were a little wooly.

When I visited over a year ago some of the picnic tables were vandalized and looked broken. Several of the plug in posts had been bent and damaged and looked a bit dangerous. I have seen photos of other campers which have camped since my visit and it looks as though they have been working on this area to make improvements and I really hope they have because I would love to see it again in better form.

The water access in my opinion was better from this side and had more points of interest overall including the feeder stream which was flowing pretty well when I was there.

TIPS:

  • If you have ATT you will not have signal here so if possible bring a booster. The entire region is spotty for this service.

  • Check out the Tent Rocks, only a short distance away for some amazing hiking and views. An amazing way to see this portion of New Mexico.

Can't Beat Honest Advertising

I saw this site when traveling though the Route 66 corridor and wanted to check it out so naturally what did I do first? Look it up online to see what the story was and if it was a true RV only park. Sometimes I will still go check out a place even if they don't let tents stay just so I can have an idea of what is out there for RVers like many of my followers and like my future self. This one was pretty comical from the perspective of what you see is what you get.

Just in case thee are any questions they have a little paragraph on their website that says:

"We do not have a pool, playground, game room, picnic tables, laundry, showers, or restrooms. No pitch tents allowed."

Yep pretty much that says it all. If you want a place to park and plug in they have you covered but anything more you are pushing it. And so just to see what that meant I had to go check it out. Pretty much the same attitude was expressed by the front office as the paragraph I attached. When I explained my purpose for my visit they were a little more friendly and started to explain on what they do offer.

Those offerings include wifi and cable along with full service city utilities. It is a first come first serve parking structure so they park you accordingly and line everyone up as they arrive so you don't really have a spot selection. This is a pass through type establishment, although if you do get their humor and like the cost and parking they do offer discounts for extended stay.

After speaking to the owner, which is always onsite I honestly didn't know what to think, I think the concept is good, the pricing is fair and very comparable to other sites, but I don't know if the mass herding of RVs is my style.

There are a few pros to staying here however:

  • You are close to the action of Route 66 so you can check out all the options, museums, shops and signature stops.
  • Close to the highway access so getting in and out of Tucumcari is pretty simple from this stop.
  • If you can get through the crass humor of the owner they are pretty friendly in way of suggesting interesting places to stop.
People Don't Respect Campground

When I stopped in this campground I was checking out the lake in general to see what kind of quality it would have, not really familiar with this area and I had seen it in passing. I was traveling through during the week and it wasn't very crowded but it seemed as though the people who had been staying at the facility really didn't have a lot of regard for the land around the lake. It looked pretty junky and the few people I did see who were still staying looked more like they were squatting than camping. Trash was littered all around their site like they had been on a multi day bender party. Not the best site to see when you pull into a campsite and it didn't look like anyone was enforcing any of the rules around camp.

With that being said camping here is very inexpensive only $8 for a primitive site and to get a fully serviced site for a night for an RV is only $18. There are several site types available in between those two options, and for the money in this area it is the most inexpensive camping I found.

They do offer in addition to camping, trails, boating and lake activities and play facilities for children. When I was there the lake itself looked pretty clean, although in comparison to their website photos it was not near as blue or well kept.

I could see the bones of this campsite were set in place for it to be a solid 4 or even 5 but with the condition it was in when I visited a 3 is pushing it.

Horses & RVs Welcome But No Tents

While I usually am pretty sad when I find a site which does not welcome tents, this spot was actually quite nice to check out and I feel had I been able to enjoy it a bit more I could have rated it higher. So why a 3?

I always keep my eye out as a travel blogger for sites which might interest my fellow traveler or followers and I have a lot of questions about equestrian camps because people like to travel for rides and such. I also am constantly asked about RV sites which are large enough for big rigs to easily navigate around instead of being crushed.

This place fits both of those needs really well!

Visually, it isn't much I must say on the outside, mostly because there isn't a ton of vegetation, but it is kind of in the desert so that can't really be held against them. It is the perfect destination for a good trail ride, which is actually what this place is designed to do.

So what does set it apart for someone like myself though who isn't interested in trail rides? The clubhouse!! It is visually probably one of the best clubhouses I have found. Bright bold colors, a pool table, fun paintings and a staff which is so friendly.

Then did I mention it is part of a Wildlife Refuge area? Yep, so if you are like me and LOVE to see nature at its finest this place checks off a lot of boxes. If only it could check off the tent site box it probably would have been the perfect blend of nature an nearby Route 66 to me.

TIPS:

  • Check out their working camper program it is pretty cool, the camp host was telling me just a little about it and it was very appealing.

  • Sure if you are there for the trails, Route 66 might seem an after thought but there are some really amazing preserved spots just in town that you will love if you like a bit of history.

Roadside Stop With Route 66 Charm Nearby

Traveling the old familiar Route 66 time and time again I have found so many stops to enjoy. I try to make it a point to check out new places each time I pass to get a full perspective of what this strip of highway has to offer. Not always will you be able to stay in a classic roadside stop, but when you can get within throwing distance of one you have to jump on the opportunity.

The grass here is semi green the spaces are large enough to not be on top of your neighbor and the staff is friendly. I like that they have a grassy tent area with the signature KOA feel in the picnic structures and while you are in a semi desolate looking space, you feel that the area has a sense of community with a lot of retro trailers and rvs passing though on the same mission as you.

This seems to be an older KOA so some of the amenities, while nice are not as up to date as other campgrounds. I noticed this mostly in the playground, and while I am perfectly happy with the see-saws and older swing sets which remind me of my own childhood, I am sure to newer parents used to all things plastic and padded this is a nightmare waiting to happen.

The pool is not large but perfectly sized for a small group and is gated to protect it from being used by just anyone at the camp during any non-specific type of hour. It is, like at many KOA camps, seasonal so if you are wanting to take a dip, might call in advance to make sure you aren't there when it isn't open. The one thing that was a little strange to me was the height of the fence, a little tall and made me think they ave had issues with fence jumping previously, then again maybe it is just an extra precaution for insurance.

Nights here are pretty quiet and if you can get past the appearance of chainlink surrounding the property you have an amazing New Mexico sunset only a short distance from the old Neons of Route 66.

The sites themselves for tents come in 3 basic types, standard grassy sites with no improvements, pull thru sites with water and electric and group sites known as the tent village. The prices vary depending on type of site and location and for tent village I will recommend booking well in advance online because I tried on three different sets of dates and it always said NOT AVAILABLE. Average cost of camp however is between $28 and $35 before tax.

TIPS:

  • Opt for a site further from the road because traffic can be a bit loud along the road side of this campground.
  • Checkout is at 11 a.m. make sure you are aware of this because otherwise you are subject to an additional days charge at any KOA camp.
FREE Backcountry Camping

When I first saw this one I was a bit hesitant because of the name itself. I, a person petrified of snakes and also familiar that names are often given for a reason, was skeptical to say the least. But I wanted to try something a bit different and check into other camping options near Carlsbad.

This one is one that you will be required to get a permit. That permit is FREE, basically they just want to know you are out there just in case. From permit issuance you are told basic instructions of camping is open as long as you are not directly on the path. You can park in certain area and must pack in your gear, so travel with only what you want to deal with on your pack.

Camping options are pretty vast. The terrain is pretty rocky and sandy but you can really get a feel for the land out here as opposed to the campgrounds near town that are pretty standard.

Campground and pickwick area

Nice old forest service campground, dirt roads and pickwick tables. A older but clean heated rest room with hot and cold running water. Water at handicap camp site, but it is turned off now as weather is cool.

Unbelievable Beauty

This is a must see! It's hard to explain the beauty of White Sands in words, but it's definitely worth the stop and 1-2 mile hike in to a primitive spot. Primitive is the only option here and be sure to check weather patterns for the times you go. I went in early spring and the wind was pretty ferocious - luckily I was prepared and had all the necessary gear. It's a tough hike in depending on your pack and the sites are as bare as it gets, but the scenery makes this place what it is. Beautiful.

Dated but has everything that you need

There are very few developed sites for RV campers, but there are plenty of primitive sites. The restrooms and showers are dated, but the do everything that you need. The dinosaur tracks are a true bonus and the information that they have posted with the tracks are very informative. The park ranger and camp host are great and most of all, you can’t beat the New Mexico State park prices.

Bring Your Water Shoes To Get To the Falls

When you come here there are two major points of interest: a waterfall and a lake. Depending on what you are wanting to do you could have two very different experiences. We decided to take both of the waterfall trails while here the first being an overlook trail which has a decent short climb to the top on a pretty well maintained trail with some altitude change but nothing major and the lower trail which follows the waters edge but has a point at which you must stop without water shoes.

Both of these hikes were short but could be a great way to spend the day just enjoying the beauty of the surroundings.

The camp itself was dry camping with staggered port a pottys and armadas or pavilions which could be used featuring kiva style cooking (pretty cool). The sites were ideal for tents and well shaded by huge trees. You could easily have a group camp without issue.

There were large fire rings and picnic tables scattered throughout camp to make your experience comfortable. I really enjoyed this area because of the difference in the land around you and the vegetation you could see as you travel along the river.

The main entrance had rangers available which could take your payment, which was very reasonable and were very helpful in explaining some of the odd things you could find in the nature around you. I had plenty of questions (there are no dumb questions when it comes to learning more about what is around you in nature)

TIPS:

  • Watch out for spiders! This is literally the only place I have ever seen a real tarantula roaming in the wilderness, it was HUGE and furry!!! Made me a little hesitant about camping on the same ground as I saw it…lol
  • GPS is a bit deceiving out here it will take you through a community instead of just on the slightly more well used roads around so when you rely on GPS just be aware if you look residential you might still be on the same path but try to follow the signs instead.
Historical significance!

Clayton Lake State Park, Clayton, NM…5200 ft elev.

Beautiful oasis nestled away in the windswept high plains of NE New Mexico. Not only for today's travelers but for yesterday's pioneers we take the Cimmaron Cutoff from the Santa Fe trail. We pitched tent at Chicano Beach site #2 (there are only two on that ridge), far away from any crowds upon a knoll overlooking a western "dog-leg" of the 170 acre reservoir. Even though the man-made Clayton lake was down from 32' to 19' depth…it was tranquil and bustling with wildlife. Coyotes barked in the distance, strutting turkey's gobbled, jackrabbit's darted, fish jumped and mule deer grazed the shoreline grasses and taking in late night and early morning drinks. Bring your binoculars to glass the shore and ridge lines. Fascinating park, the sandstone formations were varied and interesting…worn away by generations of rain. The rock garden is worth a scramble…very cool columns…(R4 campsite is nestled deep within them and the most highly coveted tent site). Highlight: The dinosaur tracks (uncovered at the spillway around 1982 after a flood) at the spillway are of particular interest. Informational signage lines the spillway and the small pavilion atop the levy. The 471 acre state park was quiet and peaceful. Mark, the park ranger, is full of great information of the area…and incredibly helpful, having spent his entire life in these parts…truly as nice a man you could meet (and the first ranger to ever return my phone message when calling for last minute availabilty). The visitor center and every other aspect of this park is spotlessly clean and meticulously maintained. The visitor center, though small, utilized every inch to bring you desired information of the park's history. New signage and informational displays were going in as we left. A heated restroom/ shower house was a wonderful creature comfort. Plenty of very new and clean pit latrines and water spigots dotted throughout the campground. If you don't want crowds avoid the fishing tournament the second weekend of June when about 900 campers descend to camp and fish…and most summer holidays. Other than that there is room….and no bad spots. I'd recommend using the online reservation portal. Tent sites are cheap($10 developed/$8 primitive)…actual too cheap, in my opinion…the state parks are nearly bankrupt, if not already so. Skeleton staffs are underpaid, yet they worked tirelessly to keep the parks to the highest standard. http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/claytonlakestatepark.html

•A nearby highlight is the Capulin Volcano National Monument an hour away up Rt 87. The walk around the rim of the dormant volcano offers epic views of the surrounding high plains, Sante Fe trail and the jagged snow capped mountains to the West.

Awesome campsite near O’keefe territory

Great campground sitting up from the lake with awesome views. Free showers, several loops, tents separate from RVs- what more could you ask for! There is lake access nearby and some nice hiking trails, but to be honest, the main attraction is Abiqueu and Goergia O’Keefe country. Tons of great hiking to places she hiked to and painted. The campground is just a few miles from the town of Abiqueu, which was O’Keefe’s main home. Be sure to stop in and visit with the librarian, she’s a great resource for information about the area. And the gas station at the bottom of the hill has a pretty good restaurant! Sites don’t have any trees, but the sage provides a bit of protection from the winds. Be sure to stake your tent well as it gets very breezy in the daytime (winds die down with the sun set). One of the nicest amenities (besides the free showers) were the lantern hooks/posts. You just don’t see those very often. Camper beware, the tent only loop is next to the group campsites, so expect some noise.

First to Review
Beautiful setting where Georgia O'Keefe Painted

While many say that Georgia O’Keefe owned Ghost Ranch, that’s not true. She actually only owned 7.5 acres of the large ranch. The whole ranch has been turned into a top notch facility with campgrounds and motel rooms, horses for rent, classes, and great hiking. The campground is large with several interconnecting loops. There aren’t many trees, but the sites are not on top of each other so there is a semblance of privacy. Showers and laundry are available in the campground. It's pretty nice that this campground is pretty much open year round, and even better with tents and RV's kept separate. There are some great hiking trails heading out of the campground as well as from other parts of the ranch. Stop in the visitors center to get a map of trails and some advice about what to hike and when (don’t plan on any mid-day hikes as it is just too hot).

Set back in the pines

A nice campground set north of the town of Jemenz Springs. There was a fire ban in place and the Forest Service was planning on closing the entire forest the morning after I showed up. I had enough time to camp and get in one hike to a social spring before they came through and closed everything up for safety. The campground was nice, but there was no water available (it had been shut off in preparation for the closure). The campsites were nice and well spaced with lots of pine trees around each site, so there was a lot of privacy. There was an abundance of pine needle duff covering the ground which would have been great until you considered the fire danger. Each site had a picnic table and fire pit (with bright tape over it to remind you not to use it).

Beautiful location

Just south of the town of Jemez Springs was this really nice campground wedged between the road and the river. Super nice campsites, some with pavilions over the picnic tables, some with river access. The campground was closed when I got there but the really nice hosts let me in to check it out. I liked the sites at the back that either had river access or pergolas. This campground was super clean; I wish I had camped here the night before as there was water available and the bathrooms were more modern and clean.