Top Cabin Camping in Washington

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Best Cabin Camping Sites in Washington (331)

    Camper-submitted photo from Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park

    1.

    Kalaloch Campground - group — Olympic National Park

    101 Reviews
    315 Photos
    1221 Saves
    Taholah, Washington

    Overview

    Kalaloch Campground is on the reservation system May 23, 2024 - September 23, 2024.__ Important changes to the reservation booking windows: To better serve visitors, Kalaloch Campground will be releasing campsites in a series of three staggered block releases by loop. These block releases will be 6 months in advance, two weeks in advance, and 4 days in advance.__ A and B loop campsites will be available for reservation 6 months in advance. Campsites A14, A16, A18, and A19 will currently not be reservable due to substantial bluff erosion. If these sites are deemed safe for camping after assessment or repairs, they will be released for online reservations within the 6 month booking window. This can be as late as spring of 2024.__ C and D loop campsites will be available for reservations two weeks in advance. Please be aware that D Loop has experienced substantial erosion damage to the road and campsites along the ocean bluff. It is possible some popular bluff sites may be closed for the summer 2024 reservation season. E and F loop campsites will be available for reservations 4 days in advance.__ During the rest of the year, it is on a first-come, first-served basis. During winter (November - April), some campground loops are closed, but camping is still available.__ Kalaloch Campground is located on the southwest coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Olympic National Park, on a high bluff adjacent to the Pacific Ocean. Although campsites are not directly on the beach, several of them overlook the water and there is beach access within the facility. The campground is large and set amidst a peaceful, coastal forest that thrives on the region's high annual rainfall. Rain or shine, it is one of the most visited areas of the park.

    Recreation

    Near the campground and lodge, trails and steps descend about 40 ft. to the beach. There are several beaches, tide pools, scenic overlooks and trails to explore. The Kalaloch Creek Nature Trail is a mile-long walk through the forest along Kalaloch Creek, which drains into the ocean. There are accessible lookout points at Ruby Beach and Beach 4.Kalaloch is known for birding; species such as western gulls and bald eagles are frequently sighted. Visitors may even spot a puffin. Fishing and shellfish harvesting is allowed under state and park regulations.Swimming is possible, however the Kalaloch area is known for large drifting logs that can pose a threat to swimmers as they wash ashore. Swimmers should also be aware of potentially dangerous rip tides.

    Facilities

    Near the campground and lodge, trails and steps descend about 40 ft. to the beach. There are several beaches, tide pools, scenic overlooks and trails to explore. The Kalaloch Creek Nature Trail is a mile-long walk through the forest along Kalaloch Creek, which drains into the ocean. There are accessible lookout points at Ruby Beach and Beach 4.Kalaloch is known for birding; species such as western gulls and bald eagles are frequently sighted. Visitors may even spot a puffin. Fishing and shellfish harvesting is allowed under state and park regulations.Swimming is possible, however the Kalaloch area is known for large drifting logs that can pose a threat to swimmers as they wash ashore. Swimmers should also be aware of potentially dangerous rip tides.

    Natural Features

    Kalaloch has no shortage of natural areas to explore. The Pacific shoreline just below provides ample habitat for marine life: tide pools reveal crabs and sea urchins at low tide; sea otters float on the surface of submerged kelp beds; shorebirds nest on beaches; and whales and dolphins occasionally emerge offshore. Beyond the national park's 73 miles of coastline lie three national wildlife refuges and one marine sanctuary.

    Nearby Attractions

    Olympic National Park has much to explore, including temperate rain forests, ocean shores, sub-alpine mountains, lakes and more. The lush Hoh Rain Forest, as well as the towns Quinault and Forks are within a 45-minute drive.Visiting the Hoh Rain ForestOlympic National Park

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $24 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Deception Pass State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Deception Pass State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Deception Pass State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Deception Pass State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Deception Pass State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Deception Pass State Park Campground

    2.

    Deception Pass State Park Campground

    99 Reviews
    399 Photos
    588 Saves
    Anacortes, Washington

    Deception Pass State Park is a 4,134-acre marine and camping park with 77,000-feet of saltwater shoreline, and 33,900-feet of freshwater shoreline on three lakes. Rugged cliffs drop to meet the turbulent waters of Deception Pass.

    The park has 167 tent sites, 143 utility spaces, five hiker / biker sites, two dump stations, 20 restrooms (four ADA), and ten showers (four ADA). Camping is located at three locations in the park, 18 tent sites and two utility sites are at Bowman Bay, seven tent sites and 54 utility sites at Quarry Pond, and 147 tent sites and 83 utility sites are at Cranberry Lake. Maximum site length is 60-feet (limited availability).

    In addition there are four campsites on Hope Island north shore bay, the pay station is near the east campsite, a vault toilet is in the woods 100-feet south of the campsites. The rest of the island is a natural area preserve and off limits to recreational use. Standard primitive campsite rules apply.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $12 - $40 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Cape Disappointment State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cape Disappointment State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cape Disappointment State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cape Disappointment State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cape Disappointment State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cape Disappointment State Park Campground

    3.

    Cape Disappointment State Park Campground

    81 Reviews
    227 Photos
    793 Saves
    Ilwaco, Washington

    Cape Disappointment is a 2,023-acre camping park on the Long Beach Peninsula, fronted by the Pacific Ocean and looking into the mouth of the Columbia River. The park offers yurts, cabins and unique historic vacation homes to meet travelers' diverse lodging needs.

    Cape Disappointment has 137 standard campsites, 50 full-hookup sites, 18 partial-hookup sites with water and electricity, five primitive hiker/biker campsites first come first served, 14 yurts, three cabins, one dump station, eight restrooms (two ADA) and 14 showers (four ADA). Maximum site length is 45 feet (limited availability). Camping is available year-round.

    Check-in time is 2:30 p.m. Check-out time is 1 p.m.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • RVs

    $40 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Dosewallips State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Dosewallips State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Dosewallips State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Dosewallips State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Dosewallips State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Dosewallips State Park Campground

    4.

    Dosewallips State Park Campground

    43 Reviews
    134 Photos
    270 Saves
    Brinnon, Washington

    Dosewallips State Park, only 60 miles north of Olympia, is the eastern gateway to the Olympic Peninsula. The region is made up of forests, mountains, rivers, beaches and deltas – and surrounded by sound and sea. This freshwater/saltwater park makes a perfect day or weekend trip. It can also serve as a base from which to explore the historic forts and charming small towns to the north, or the first night on a grand road trip around the peninsula.

    The park's moss-carpeted forest and glacial river slope down to a shell-strewn delta on Hood Canal, a delight for clam-diggers, anglers, boaters, birders and beach explorers. The park features riverside campsites, cabins and five-person platform tents.

    Guests may share space with the local elk herds that wander through camp. (Stay back 100 feet, and never offer food.) Bald eagles have been seen on the beach and great blue herons flock to the river.

    The evening may find you grilling up a shellfish dinner and retiring to your cabin or tent, where you'll fall asleep to the sound of the river, enchanted by this lush, green corner of the country.

    PARK FEATURES Dosewallips State Park is a 1,064-acre, year-round camping park with 5 miles of shoreline on Hood Canal and the Dosewallips River. All camp areas are grassy and located in scenic, rustic settings.

    All campsites are on the reservation system. The campground has 37 tent spaces, 58 utility sites, twelve cabins, one dump station, four restrooms (one ADA), and two showers (one ADA). Maximum site length is 40 feet (limited availability). During winter months (November 15 through March 1), the campground is winterized and only sites 21-29 have water. Winter water supply is still available.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $12 - $50 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground

    5.

    Lake Wenatchee State Park Campground

    42 Reviews
    138 Photos
    440 Saves
    Leavenworth, Washington

    Lake Wenatchee State Park is a 489-acre camping park with 12,623-feet of waterfront on glacier-fed Lake Wenatchee and the Wenatchee River and is a great place for camping near Seattle. The park is bisected by the Wenatchee River, creating two distinct areas – south park, which features areas for camping, swimming and horseback riding, and north park, which is in a less developed, forested section of the park and a quarter-mile walk from the lake.

    The park has 155 tent spaces, 42 water and electric sites, one dump station, seven restrooms, and 16 showers. In addition, the park provides two ADA campsites. Call 509-763-3101 for more information.

    The south campground (sites 1 - 100) has parking pads 30 to 40-feet in length, with only two pull-through sites. Larger RVs and fifth-wheelers should use the north campground (sites 101 - 197) which includes 42 large pull-through utility sites. Maximum tents allowed are one family tent or up to two 2-3 man tents. Maximum vehicles allowed are two per site, additional vehicles may park in overflow areas.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area
    Camper-submitted photo from Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area

    6.

    Colonial Creek South Campground — Ross Lake National Recreation Area

    40 Reviews
    147 Photos
    535 Saves
    Marblemount, Washington

    Overview

    Colonial Creek South Campground in North Cascades National Park is a remote, yet bustling campground nestled in old -growth forest. Located on the south side of State Route 20 near milepost 130, there are 94 campsites that are surrounded by forest and located on Diablo Lake.__ Colonial Creek South Campground can accommodate a variety of camping, whether it___s drive-in camping, or walk-in tent camping. The campsites vary in size from small to medium. Most of the campsites do not accommodate large trailers or RVs.____

    Recreation

    Campers can access the Thunder Creek Trailhead from the South Loop. The Thunder Knob Trailhead is on the north loop across State Route 20.____ Fishing is allowed in Diablo Lake with a Washington State Fishing license, the nearest location to purchase a license is in the town of Marblemount, WA. Follow Washington State Fishing Regulations when recreating.__ Black bears are active in this campground and the surrounding trails. Be aware of your surroundings while hiking, picnicking, and camping. Use the provided bear boxes in your campsite to store coolers, cookware, and other odorants when not in use. If you encounter a bear around the campground or on a trail, inform campground staff or go to the North Cascades Visitor Center and fill out a bear report.__

    Facilities

    Campers can access the Thunder Creek Trailhead from the South Loop. The Thunder Knob Trailhead is on the north loop across State Route 20.____ Fishing is allowed in Diablo Lake with a Washington State Fishing license, the nearest location to purchase a license is in the town of Marblemount, WA. Follow Washington State Fishing Regulations when recreating.__ Black bears are active in this campground and the surrounding trails. Be aware of your surroundings while hiking, picnicking, and camping. Use the provided bear boxes in your campsite to store coolers, cookware, and other odorants when not in use. If you encounter a bear around the campground or on a trail, inform campground staff or go to the North Cascades Visitor Center and fill out a bear report.__

    Natural Features

    Colonial Creek South Campground is surrounded by a forest of western redcedar, western hemlock, Douglas-fir, red huckleberries, and other native vegetation. The campground has easy access to Diablo Lake for recreating.____

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (360) 854-7200.

    Nearby Attractions

    Traveling west on State Route 20:____ The North Cascades Visitor Center is 11 miles (18 km) west on State Route 20 from Colonial Creek South Campground, operating seasonally, typically from May to September. Campers can find the passport stamps, exhibits, park film, park store, and much more.______ Traveling east on State Route 20:____ Diablo Lake Overlook is 1.5 miles (2 km) east on State Route 20. the turquoise lake can be viewed safely from this area and there is ample day use parking and vault toilets.__ Ross Lake Overlook is 5 miles (8 km) east on State Route 20, this is a less developed vista point. There are two pull off areas with interpretive way sides and with views of the Ross Dam and Ross Lake.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $16 - $24 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Seaquest State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Seaquest State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Seaquest State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Seaquest State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Seaquest State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Seaquest State Park Campground

    7.

    Seaquest State Park Campground

    41 Reviews
    101 Photos
    207 Saves
    Silverlake, Washington

    Far in the Northwestern corner of the United States lies a world of magic, splendor, and mystical beauty. Perched atop the historical Mount St. Helens, Seaquest State Park is the home-base for thousands of volcanic visitors year round. Most notable for its proximity to the Mount St. Helens Visitors Center, this park is the home base for hikers, explorers, tourists, and adventures alike. It’s not just the volcanic aftermath that makes this area so special. Even before the eruption, Gifford-Pinchot National Forest has always been known for its dense foliage, as well as its beautiful lakes, tributaries, and waterfalls.

    When it comes to nearby attractions, the area is packed with them. Miles and miles of trails fork and wind throughout the park. Beyond the confines of the park’s boundaries are numerous additional trailheads, all offering something unique to those seeking it. Perhaps the most popular trail nearby is the Monitor Ridge trail. This 10 miles round trip excursion will have you climbing 2,000 vertical ft. through grassy meadows and winding forest paths. The last 1,000 feet are especially difficult due to the volcanic debris and soot that cakes your clothes. However when you finally reach the domed summit, you’ll be pleased with your efforts. Massive and expansive, the St. Helens dome is unlike any other scenic viewpoint in the US. Nowhere else can you see the true force and impact of Mother Nature’s wrath.

    Nearby, the Mount St. Helens Ape Caves give visitors a chance to traverse through the labyrinth of volcanic caves left behind by magma runs during the the eruption. Today, the caves are a popular attraction for families and explorers. There’s two separate options, one which is well-lit and suited for families. The other option will send you through a pitch black adventure trekking the depths of the craggy, drippy tunnels. If planning to visit, be sure to bring a strong flashlight or kerosene lantern, as you’ll be unable to enter otherwise.

    Camping in Seaquest State Park is relatively painless thanks to the 52 standard campsites, 18 partial-hookup sites, and 15 full-service sites. RVers, tent campers, van travelers, and anyone else with a form of shelter should have no issues finding somewhere to stay here. Aside from standard camping accommodations, there are also full-service Yurts available for rental, complete with heaters to stay warm if you’re visiting in the chilly months.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground

    8.

    Battle Ground Lake State Park Campground

    39 Reviews
    175 Photos
    369 Saves
    Heisson, Washington

    Battle Ground Lake State Park is a forested camping park in the Cascade Mountain foothills; its proximity to Vancouver and Portland and its cool green lake make it a great escape from the bustle of city and suburbs.

    Children play in the shallow swim area under the watchful eyes of their picnicking parents, anglers float on the lake, hikers and campers take quiet strolls in the woods. On sunny weekends, laughter fills the playground, lakefront and kitchen areas. Whether you've come for a rest or a family play day, time spent at Battle Ground Lake will leave you refreshed and ready to tackle your life once again.

    PARK FEATURES The 280-acre park offers hiking, biking, horse trails and a primitive equestrian camping area. The spring-fed lake is attractive to swimmers and paddlers and is stocked with trout, making it a favorite of anglers.

    The park has 35 standard campsites, six partial-hookups sites, 15 primitive sites that require campers to hike up to half a mile from the parking lot, two primitive equestrian sites, four cabins, one RV dump station, two restrooms and four showers. Maximum site length is 35 feet (may have limited availability).

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground

    9.

    Fort Flagler Historical State Park Campground

    34 Reviews
    104 Photos
    238 Saves
    Nordland, Washington

    Step into U.S. military history at Fort Flagler Historical State Park on the northern tip of Marrowstone Island. Tour and explore a significant coastal defense fort established more than a century ago to guard the entrance to Puget Sound.

    Built in the late 1890s and manned during World War I, World War II and the Korean War, Fort Flagler now features a military museum and gift shop. The park offers guided tours of the gun emplacements and other facilities during the summer. Or find the batteries on your own and wander through them at leisure.

    Fort Flagler activities include hiking, boating, kite-flying, beach exploration, saltwater fishing, clam digging and crabbing. Experienced paragliders can bring their wings and ride thermals up to stupendous aerial views.

    Group camps Hoskins, Richmond and Wilson are available for retreats of up to 250 people, and historic officers' vacation houses can be booked for group gatherings and romantic getaways. Beachfront tent and RV sites boast some of the best views in the region. So gaze out on the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the north, the Olympic Peninsula to the west and Whidbey Island to the east, and breathe deep of the ocean air.

    The group of forts once known as the "Triangle of Fire" (made up of Fort Flagler, Fort Worden and Fort Casey) is a must-see for military, armament and maritime enthusiasts. Fort Flagler's off-the-beaten track location and its wide, manicured former parade lawns make it a winning destination.

    Fort Flagler Camping has 59 standard sites, 55 full-hookup sites, two primitive sites, one Cascadia Marine Trail (PDF) site, one dump station, two restrooms.

    Forty-seven standard tent sites and two primitive sites are in the upper camping area. This area is suitable for tents and some sites can accommodate RV's up to 25 feet.

    Twelve standard sites and 55 full-hookup sites are in the lower camp area and have easy access to the beach. Maximum site length is 50 feet (limited availability).

    Check-in time is 2:30 p.m. Check-out time is 1 p.m.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkamp Eastcreek
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkamp Eastcreek
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkamp Eastcreek
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkamp Eastcreek
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkamp Eastcreek
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkamp Eastcreek

    10.

    Elkamp Eastcreek

    32 Reviews
    105 Photos
    219 Saves
    Mineral, Washington

    Elkamp Eastcreek allows visitors a chance to connect with nature and experience the great outdoors. Located near the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, this campground provides easy access to a wide range of outdoor recreational activities such as hiking, fishing, river rafting, kayaking and wildlife watching. The campsites are nestled among the trees and offer plenty of privacy, making it a perfect destination for those seeking a peaceful retreat whether that be in a tent or more luxurious cabin. Elkamp Eastcreek also features modern amenities, including clean restrooms, showers and laundry facilities.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $25 - $40 / night

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