The best HIKE IN camping near
Livingston , TENNESSEE

178 Reviews18 Campgrounds
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Most Recent Livingston Camping Reviews
Beautiful clean state park

We really enjoyed Rock Island State Park. The campgrounds are easily accessible and roomy. We were there only couple days but would love to go back and visit some of the cute shops and ice cream trailer at the entrance later. It is probably lots of fun in the summer with the huge beach. We plan to visit again soon. FYI there are some sites with sewer. I didn’t realize this when I reserved. They have great dump station but prefer to have that taken care of before we pull out.

The Caney Fork River Campsite is Great

I hiked out to the Caney Fork River Campsite with the Nashville Backpacking Meetup. The trails were really clearly marked, so they were easy to follow despite all of the leaves on the ground, and there were plenty of signs indicating where to go. The site is less than half a mile away from the falls, and has really easy access to the river for water. There wasn't any trash laying around that we could see, and we found plenty of firewood.

Camp 6P

Clean and we'll maintained, busy but great.

This is a nice, fairly small state park campground

Be wary of the speed bumps throughout the campground, they are closely spaced and rather abrupt, take them very slowly. The sites are all elevated platforms due to the steep slope to the lake, which we had not encountered before, but are very widely space. We were in site 50, which had no visibility to DISH west satellites, and we were not able to pick up and OTA TV with our omni antenna. Most of the fire rings are in a narrow strip of gravel along the road, but you can get chairs around most of them. The campground was less than half full during the week. There are several trails in the park, but we were only here two days and only got to hike the one to the marina, which was nice. AT&T had 2 bars and 1 MB/s w/o a booster, 3 bars and 4 MB/s with it. Overall WiFi was problematic. We were able to get connected and got 3 MB/s once, but unable to get a connection with any data rate the rest of our stay and the park was not that busy.

Clean, Fun and Beautiful!

This was my second trip to the Cumberland Mountain State Park Campground. This campground has everything you need and nothing you don't. The prices are reasonable and the hiking trails within the park start right next to the campsites. The campground has clean water, plenty of hookups and is so incredibly quiet.  This is one of my favorite campgrounds.

Nice amenities, pool, playground

Just ran into this spot and was pleasantly surprised at how nice it was especially for the cost. Showers and facilities were great and clean. Tent camping and RVs were separated in different loops which is nice.

The campsite is nice and wooded, sites are spaced nicely. There was a bear box and a fire ring at my site. Plenty of hiking nearby.

The recreation area was a real nice surprise in terms of scenery. The rafting looked great at the right time of year.

I don’t think there was any first come first serve sights, but there were plenty of sites mid October.

There looks like great mountain biking, horseback riding, and some challenging hiking near by.

I’d check out Yahoo Falls which was really nice. I can imagine at high water Angel Falls would be grand, even though there was low water it was a nice and easy hike along the river.

Compact place

This campground had about 10 sites all very close together except site #1 which was right near the main parking lot the volt toilets stunk bad worse one I’ve been in we stayed for 2 nights and it wasn’t cleaned at all the iron bridge was pretty though!

Awesome Waterfalls

 Rock Island State park is a great place to camp. The campground is large and the campsites are spacious and far enough apart that you feel secluded, even when it’s full. It’s heavily wooded, so you don’t feel like your neighbors on right on top of you. The sites are paved and have water and electric, no septic where I was, however and they have a dump station that was large enough for two people to use at the same time. There are so many things to do at the campground, or the park, you will not be bored. Rock Island has some of the best waterfalls in Tennessee, and you can get right up to some them, if you are brave enough to kayak close to them. They also have a swimming area, and sand volleyball. Great biking in the park also. The area has lots of little shops and antique stores, if you’re into that, and Calf Killer Brewery is a short drive, and I highly recommend visiting there. Overall, this is a great park to visit, and a great place to camp.

Bridgestone- Firestone, Virgin Falls

Bridgestone-Firestone-Virgin Falls WMA This WMA is the cream of the crop. I think it’s the largest WMA I’ve ever been to. I think we had the perfect camp spot. Nice and level, wooded and secluded, fire pit already constructed, plenty of firewood around. If you love primitive camping, this place is a goldmine. There’s no shortage of great camp sites too. Virgin Falls is nearby, however the trail was closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. There is also a store there, but it was also closed. I was here back in spring turkey season, and there were only a couple other hunters that were camping that I saw. During hunting season, you can only camp here if you are hunting, but it is always free. This is a very nice choice for free primitive camping.

Virgin Falls Pocket Wilderness - Gem of a Place

This is one of my favorite areas to hike and camp. There are three official camping areas: Cable Crossing, Martha’s Pretty Point, and at Virgin Falls. There are two ways to get to the Point: the main trail (white blaze) and the Upland Trail (blue blaze). The Upland trail is about 2.4 miles to the point, is mostly a wide gravel logging road, and is easy until you get to a creek crossing in the woods where it is a little confusing as to which direction to take. We actually got a little lost in the woods on the last trip because it was overgrown at that spot and just wasn’t very obvious. But we retraced our steps and figured it out. Campsites 4-7 are up on the point. 7 is the largest and most secluded. 6 is also very nice. 5 is right along the main trail, across from the point, and 4 is right at the point, which sounds nice, but day hikers walk right through the site to get to the overlook. Part of the creek runs right below the point, past the ladder on the trail back down to the main trail (upland trail is somewhat of a loop). But don’t count on water. I hiked it two weeks before I went back and camped it. It was running when I hiked it, 2 weeks later it was dry despite having rained for days. We tarped rainwater the first night and hiked the half mile down to the creek on the main trail the next day for water. Finding a good tree to hang the food was no problem here, and we had no close encounters with any wildlife. We did hear coyotes in the distance the first night, which was nice. 

Campsites 1-3 are at Cable Crossing**. Campsite #1 is the most secluded of the three, with a rock wall on one side which is nice. But it’s the least level of the sites. I don’t like it because of that. Site 2 is flat, but small. Site 3 is large and flat. We had 4 tents there easily. These sites are right along the main trail, so there’s a lot of traffic. Wood to burn is very scarce here. But being at the creek crossing, water isn’t a problem. Water filter is a necessity for camping in this little wilderness. Finding a good tree to hang food here was impossible. We did the best we could, but if something wanted the food, they were going to get it. It was hung pretty low. We had no scavenger activity. I think the likelihood of bears here is very small, but we always hang because it’s a good habit. The hike in to Cable Crossing from the parking lot is pretty easy. A little harder than the Upland trail to the point, but still pretty easy. It’s Just past the intersection of the main trail with the Trail up to the point where this area starts to get strenuous. At this point, I have only been as far In as Big Laurel Falls (I really love Big Laurel). The hike from Cable Crossing to Big Laurel is no joke. I’d call it moderately difficult. But I’ve heard it gets even harder past there. I’m going to day hike the rest of it soon. I’ve just had so much fun exploring the first 2.5 miles of this place, learning all I can about the first half of it. 

**Just on the other side of the cable crossing is an “unofficial” campsite. It’s not a designated site, but it gets a lot of use and I’ve seen Forestry employees interacting with folks camping there and it seemed fine/acceptable.