Top RV Camping near Topton, NC

Are you planning an RV camping trip to Topton? We've got you covered. Finding a place to camp in North Carolina with your RV has never been easier. These scenic and easy-to-reach Topton campsites are perfect for RV campers.

Best RV Camping Sites Near Topton, NC (314)

    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    1.

    Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    119 Reviews
    473 Photos
    987 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Overview

    Located eight miles from Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Elkmont Campground is the largest and busiest campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. At an elevation of 2,150 feet, the area enjoys a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers.

    Recreation

    The Little River runs through the campground offering visitors the option to camp waterfront. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the Little River and countless other streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Elkmont Campground. The nearby and popular Laurel Falls Trail leads to a spectacular 80-ft. waterfall. Hiking and fishing are not the only reasons for visiting the Smokies: Picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are popular activities. With around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies are the most biologically-diverse area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    The Little River runs through the campground offering visitors the option to camp waterfront. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the Little River and countless other streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Elkmont Campground. The nearby and popular Laurel Falls Trail leads to a spectacular 80-ft. waterfall. Hiking and fishing are not the only reasons for visiting the Smokies: Picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are popular activities. With around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies are the most biologically-diverse area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Natural Features

    Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Little River and Jakes Creek run through the campground, offering easy access for fishing or cool summertime splashing. Trailheads for Little River Trail, Jakes Creek Trail, and Elkmont Nature Trail are located adjacent to the campground. Historic remnants of Little River Lumber Company's logging camp and old buildings from the Elkmont resort community offer campers a glimpse of life at Elkmont nearly a century ago.

    Nearby Attractions

    Gatlinburg, one of the Smokies' most famous tourist towns, is located about nine miles from Elkmont and offers organized rafting trips, museums, restaurants, galleries, an aquarium, skiing and more.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground

    2.

    Cades Cove Campground

    93 Reviews
    529 Photos
    583 Saves
    Townsend, Tennessee

    Cades Cove Campground, located near Townsend, TN, is a fantastic spot for those looking to immerse themselves in the beauty of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Open from March 11 to October 31, this campground offers a range of accommodations including tent sites, RV spots, cabins, and even glamping options.

    One of the standout features here is the proximity to the Cades Cove Loop, a scenic drive that’s a hit with visitors. You can expect to see plenty of wildlife, including turkeys, bears, and coyotes. The campground itself is pretty quiet, especially at night, making it a great place to hear the sounds of nature.

    The campground has flush toilets, potable water at the toilet facilities, and a sanitary dump station. While there are no showers or sewer hookups, the convenience of having a camp store on-site makes up for it. You can grab essentials like firewood and ice without having to leave the campground.

    For those who love biking, the campground offers bike rentals, and the loop is perfect for a leisurely ride. If hiking is more your speed, there are plenty of trails nearby to explore. Just be aware that cell service is spotty, so it’s a good idea to bring a book or download some shows ahead of time.

    Visitors have mentioned that the sites are a bit close together, but the overall experience of being so close to nature more than makes up for it. Whether you’re here for a weekend getaway or a longer stay, Cades Cove Campground provides a great base for exploring the Smokies.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • RVs

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground

    3.

    Black Rock Mountain State Park Campground

    53 Reviews
    322 Photos
    391 Saves
    Rabun Gap, Georgia

    Situated at 3,640 feet, Black Rock Mountain State Park is Georgia’s highest park and is often home to much cooler weather than the rest of the state, offering relief for much of the year. RVers should check the weather in Clayton, GA before embarking up the steep, winding roads on icy days. With over 50 campsites and 10 cabins in Black Rock Mountain State Park, every kind of camper will find comfort.

    Though the park is named for Black Rock Mountain, it is also home to four other peaks, topping out at over 3,000 ft each. Five different hiking trails can be found within the park, providing access to the diverse wilderness of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Hop on the newest trail, the Norma Campbell Cove Trail, or opt for something more traditional like the Eastern Continental Divide. No matter what you choose, the views are sure to impress.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $30 - $150 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Vogel State Park Campground

    4.

    Vogel State Park Campground

    64 Reviews
    290 Photos
    572 Saves
    Suches, Georgia

    Established in 1931, Vogel State Park stands today as one of Georgia’s oldest state parks. Over 223 acres of land make up this beautiful reserve, known for its extensive selection of trails and crisp, brightly colored forests. Located at the base of Blood Mountain in the heart of the Chattahoochee National Forest, Vogel is especially popular during the fall thanks to the blanket of colors that transform the park’s trees and wildlife. In fact, Red, yellow, and gold leaves cover the landscape of the surrounding hills, mountains, and valleys for months at a time.

    This park is also full of history, with many facilities being constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. To learn about the “CCC” boys and their incredible story, check out the park museum open seasonally.

    The North Georgia Mountains around Vogel were also linked to native tribes for generations before European settlement, and the adventurous individual can still find remnants from their time on this land via the surrounding trails. In fact, there are a variety of trails available, including the 4 mile Bear Hair Gap loop. Bear Hair is easier than other hikes in the area and leads to the Trahlyta Falls, a peaceful set of waterfalls perfect for photo opportunities or a small picnic. More seasoned hikers can undergo the challenging 13-mile Coosa Backcountry Trail, which showcases the regional wildlife and various water features throughout.

    If hiking isn’t your thing, the park’s 22 acre lake is open to non-motorized boats, and during summer, visitors can cool off at the mountain-view beach. Enjoy paddleboarding or kayaking while your family watches you from shore, then finish up with a round of mini golf at the park’s 18 hole course.

    For overnight accommodations, 34 Cottages, 85 campsites and 18 primitive backpacking sites are all available for a reasonable rate.There is also a pioneer campground available for rent, which is perfect for groups and allows campers to see how past settlers would have lived. During your stay, there are 4 picnic shelters available for use, as well as a group shelter and a lake pavilion, which seat 90 and 100 guests respectively. There is also a general store open year round, with Wifi open at the visitor center.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $30 - $250 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    5.

    Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    51 Reviews
    433 Photos
    408 Saves
    Cherokee, North Carolina

    Overview

    Situated in the stunning Great Smoky Mountains National Park, this sunny group camp offers an ideal setting for camping excursions. Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World-renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian culture, this is America's most visited national park.

    Recreation

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails, including The Smokemont Loop Trail and the Bradley Fork Trail, accessible from the camp. But hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. The nearby Bradley Fork River provides a great place to splash in the stream or fish for trout. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies have the most biological diversity of any area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails, including The Smokemont Loop Trail and the Bradley Fork Trail, accessible from the camp. But hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. The nearby Bradley Fork River provides a great place to splash in the stream or fish for trout. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies have the most biological diversity of any area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Natural Features

    Smokemont Group Camp is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges, blanketed in wildflowers during the spring and bursting with vivid foliage in the fall. At 2,200 feet, Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Great Smoky Mountains National Park preserves a rich cultural history of Southern Appalachia. From the pre-historic Paleo Indians to early 19th century European settlers, the park strives to protect the historic structures, landscapes and artifacts that tell the stories of the people who once called these mountains home.

    Nearby Attractions

    The adjacent Smokemont Campground provides additional camping facilities for smaller groups. The Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Oconaluftee Indian Village and Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, located six miles away in Cherokee, North Carolina, provides cultural and historical information about the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Cherokee also provides grocery stores and fuel.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Customers who cancel a group overnight facility reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian

    $50 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground

    6.

    Greenbrier Campground

    69 Reviews
    222 Photos
    654 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Greenbrier Campground TN is surrounded by the Little Pigeon River and offer RV sites, tent camping, RV rentals, cabins, and bell tents. Located only 6 miles from downtown Gatlinburg and 8 miles from the entrance to the GSMNP, we are convenient to all area attractions.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $35 - $258 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground

    7.

    Tallulah Gorge State Park Campground

    67 Reviews
    326 Photos
    493 Saves
    Tallulah Falls, Georgia

    Tallulah Gorge State Park is designated one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia and is a great place for camping near Atlanta. Tallulah Gorge is a 2-mile-long, 1000-foot-deep canyon of metamorphic rock, where the Tallulah River tumbles over six dramatic waterfalls. This unique ecosystem is also the home to several endangered plant species, including the persistent trillium. These natural features have drawn visitors to the gorge since the early 1800s, and with the construction of the Tallulah Falls Railway in 1882, it became Georgia’s first official tourist attraction. Now the gorge is a hotspot for outdoor activity, ranging from hiking, fishing and swimming, to more adventurous pursuits, such as rock climbing and whitewater paddling.

    The best way to explore Tallulah Gorge is to camp at Tallulah Gorge State Park. Located 100 miles northeast of Atlanta, this 2700-acre park provides 50 tent and RV sites (two are ADA-accessible) on the rim of the raging river gorge. The park also has one group site, and three hike-in backcountry sites. Campsites in the park are fairly compact and close together, so don’t expect a lot of seclusion. Campground amenities include flush toilets, showers, laundry facilities and a dump station. There are also two playgrounds for the kids, picnic areas, an interpretive center, and access to a sandy beach on Tallulah Falls Lake.

    The main draw to Tallulah Gorge is hiking down to Sliding Rock at the bottom of the gorge. The park only issues 100 permits per day for this hike in order to minimize impact and maintain the canyon’s natural character. These permits are given on a first-come, first-serve basis, and cannot be reserved in advance—so get yours early! Without a permit, there are many more trails to hike along the rim of the gorge, with each offering stunning viewpoints. Don’t miss the suspension bridge on the Hurricane Falls Trail, which provides a spectacular river view from 80 feet directly above the churning waterfall.

    FUN FACT: Tallulah Gorge was used as a filming location for Marvel’s Infinity War. Eagle-eyed fans may recognize Hurricane Falls in the final battle in Wakanda.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground

    8.

    Standing Indian Campground

    19 Reviews
    49 Photos
    227 Saves
    Otto, North Carolina

    Overview

    Whether traveling with an RV or tent, Standing Indian Campground is a prime place to stop for a night or spend several days in the picturesque Nantahala National Forest. The campground's many amenities provide a comfortable home base for exploring this fun and historic section of the forest. Standing Indian is located within a 20-minute drive of Franklin, North Carolina.

    Recreation

    The Standing Indian Basin is a premier hiking destination. The campground provides access to numerous trails, including the world-famous Appalachian Trail, which journeys from Georgia to Maine. Visitors who wish to get their feet wet can experience the Nantahala River, well-known for whitewater rafting, kayaking and trout fishing (fishing license required). Big and small game hunting is available in the surrounding area.

    Facilities

    The Standing Indian Basin is a premier hiking destination. The campground provides access to numerous trails, including the world-famous Appalachian Trail, which journeys from Georgia to Maine. Visitors who wish to get their feet wet can experience the Nantahala River, well-known for whitewater rafting, kayaking and trout fishing (fishing license required). Big and small game hunting is available in the surrounding area.

    Natural Features

    The campground is surrounded by 5,000' peaks and crossed by several natural streams. It sits at an elevation of 3,880 feet at the headwaters of the scenic Nantahala River, amidst lush forests of evergreen trees and rhododendrons.

    Charges & Cancellations

    There is not a premium type site available but there is some nonelectric double site that is $40.00 per night.

    • Pets
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $28 - $40 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    9.

    Cades Cove Group Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    26 Reviews
    68 Photos
    145 Saves
    Townsend, Tennessee

    Overview

    Over 2 million visitors annually come to enjoy the scenic beauty of Cades Cove and its many historic structures, popular biking and hiking trails and scenic waterfalls and streams. Tucked in the mountains under a lush, shaded canopy, this group campground offers the best that the Great Smoky Mountains National park has to offer.

    Recreation

    The Great Smoky Mountains are a hikers paradise and visitors to Cades Cove Campground love the 5-mile roundtrip hike to Abram Falls. From Cades Cove Loop Road, turnoff at the sign and follow the directions to the trailhead. Although Abrams Falls is only 20 feet high, the large volume of water rushing over falls more than makes up for its lack of height. The long, deep pool at its base is very picturesque. The trail to the falls traverses pine-oak forest on the ridges and hemlock and rhododendron forest along the creek. The waterfall and creek are named for Cherokee Chief Abram or Abraham whose village once stood several miles downstream. A nearby horse stable provides one-hour horseback rides as well as hay rides and carriage rides from March through October, offering recreational activities for the entire family. Campers can also enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance.

    Facilities

    The Great Smoky Mountains are a hikers paradise and visitors to Cades Cove Campground love the 5-mile roundtrip hike to Abram Falls. From Cades Cove Loop Road, turnoff at the sign and follow the directions to the trailhead. Although Abrams Falls is only 20 feet high, the large volume of water rushing over falls more than makes up for its lack of height. The long, deep pool at its base is very picturesque. The trail to the falls traverses pine-oak forest on the ridges and hemlock and rhododendron forest along the creek. The waterfall and creek are named for Cherokee Chief Abram or Abraham whose village once stood several miles downstream. A nearby horse stable provides one-hour horseback rides as well as hay rides and carriage rides from March through October, offering recreational activities for the entire family. Campers can also enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance.

    Natural Features

    Cades Cove is a broad, verdant valley surrounded by mountains and is one of the most popular destinations in the Great Smokies. It offers some of the best opportunities for wildlife viewing in the park. Large numbers of white-tailed deer are frequently seen, and sightings of black bear, coyote, ground hog, turkey, raccoon, skunk, and other animals are also possible. For hundreds of years Cherokee Indians hunted in Cades Cove but archeologists have found no evidence of major settlements. The first Europeans settled in the cove sometime between 1818 and 1821. By 1830 the population of the area had already swelled to 271.

    Nearby Attractions

    The park holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park, a few of which are easily accessible from the Cades Cove Loop Road. Townsend, located about nine miles away, offers full service grocery stores and fuel.

    Charges & Cancellations

    _____ If you plan to arrive at a date later than your arrival date you MUST contact the campground office 865-448-4103 in order to avoid a cancellation to your reservation. If you wish to cancel your reservation the day of your arrival you MUST contact the campground office 865-448-4103 in order to receive a refund. ___ Rules and reservation policies can be found at https://www.recreation.gov/rules-reservation-policies Customers who cancel a group overnight facility reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $50 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Unicoi State Park & Lodge
    Camper-submitted photo from Unicoi State Park & Lodge
    Camper-submitted photo from Unicoi State Park & Lodge
    Camper-submitted photo from Unicoi State Park & Lodge
    Camper-submitted photo from Unicoi State Park & Lodge
    Camper-submitted photo from Unicoi State Park & Lodge

    10.

    Unicoi State Park & Lodge

    50 Reviews
    202 Photos
    357 Saves
    Helen, Georgia

    Unicoi State Park & Lodge is a camper’s paradise. Nestled in the natural setting of the Appalachian foothills, Unicoi State Park & Lodge offers campers a wide range of camping options. From luxury RV hookups to secluded tent campsites to the distinct outdoor hammock experience of the Squirrels Nest, our Georgia State Park campground is designed to suit the various needs of our guests.

    We have nearly 100 campsites and a variety of arrangements to choose from including ADA sites and Buddy Hook-up sites, 30-foot and 40-foot RV sites, primitive campsites and sites designed for family tent camping. All our powered sites are suitable for tent, trailer and RV campers.

    As a Georgia State Park, countless guests come to explore the 1,029 acres of adventure activities and mountain marvels on their own terms. Some enjoy navigating the hiking and mountain biking trails to nearby Alpine Helen and Anna Ruby Falls. Others opt for peaceful mornings fishing on Unicoi Lake or a sandy, sun-soaked day at Unicoi Beach.

    The park’s proximity to popular Helen, GA events and activities allow guests to experience one of Georgia’s top tourist attractions but still return to the natural confines of the park for rest and relaxation.

    For your convenience, our campgrounds feature comfort stations, which include restrooms and showers, while campers also have access to group structures and picnic shelters.

    We are a pet-friendly State Park as long as your pets are friendly and always kept on a short, sturdy leash. Please be courteous to other patrons and be responsible for maintaining the cleanliness of our park and trails by cleaning up after your animals.

    For a bird’s eye view of Unicoi State Park & Lodge and campground locations, check out our Georgia State Park Map.

    RV CAMPING As one of the premier Georgia State Parks with RV camping, our full hookup RV sites include water, power and sewer, a fire ring, grill and picnic table. We have many RV campsites and arrangements to choose from including ADA sites, Buddy Hook-up sites, plus 30-foot or 40-foot sites. Be sure to know your vehicle’s specifications when booking your campsite.

    TENT CAMPING We also offer walk-in primitive campsites that have both privacy and convenience with comfort stations, nearby parking and a playground. Walk-in anywhere from a few feet to about 100 yards out. Sites include a fire ring, picnic table and grill top to put over fire ring for grilling.

    SQUIRREL’S NEST Bring your hammock or just a sleeping bag and sleep under the stars at our one-of-a-kind Squirrel’s Nest covered primitive camping platforms. It’s a favorite spot for scouts, groups and adventurers that really want to experience the wild and do it themselves. The platforms are built up off the ground and are stacked up the side of a ridge in 3 groups of 2 and 2 groups of 5. Each platform sleeps 4 guests in sleeping bags. Air mattresses are recommended for adult guests. Tents are not allowed on the platforms or down in the hollow below. The “hollow” has grills, picnic tables and a group fire ring.

    GLAMPING SITES Combining luxury and the great outdoors, our extra spacious completely furnished Safari Tents give large families or groups of friends the extra space they need to glamp in comfort. Unicoi State Park offers 4 glamping sites.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • RVs
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Frequently Asked Questions

Which is the most popular rv campsite near Topton, NC?

According to TheDyrt.com, the most popular rv campground near Topton, NC is Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park with a 4.6-star rating from 119 reviews.

What is the best site to find rv camping near Topton, NC?

TheDyrt.com has all 314 rv camping locations near Topton, NC, with real photos and reviews from campers.