Top RV Camping near Balsam, NC

Are you planning an RV camping trip to Balsam? We've got you covered. Finding a place to camp in North Carolina with your RV has never been easier. You're sure to find the perfect campsite for your North Carolina RV camping excursion.

Best RV Camping Sites Near Balsam, NC (325)

    Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground

    1.

    Davidson River Campground

    79 Reviews
    236 Photos
    771 Saves
    Pisgah Forest, North Carolina

    Overview

    Davidson River Recreation Area offers camping and outdoor activities for the whole family. The campground boasts several loops of shaded campsites, as well as access to hiking trails, fishing spots, waterfalls and several nearby attractions within Pisgah National Forest. It lies just four miles west of the town of Brevard and less than an hour from the city of Asheville. The facility is open year-round. Learn more here to prepare for your trip.__

    Recreation

    The forest is known for its hiking trails, several of which are near the campground. Hikers can challenge themselves with the 12.3-mile Art Loeb Trail, the 3.7-mile North Slope Trail or a 1.5-mile walking trail. The Davidson River offers excellent trout fishing, plus tubing and swimming, which are kid-friendly favorite activities. Visitors wishing to learn more about the area can attend educational programs in summer and fall.

    Facilities

    The forest is known for its hiking trails, several of which are near the campground. Hikers can challenge themselves with the 12.3-mile Art Loeb Trail, the 3.7-mile North Slope Trail or a 1.5-mile walking trail. The Davidson River offers excellent trout fishing, plus tubing and swimming, which are kid-friendly favorite activities. Visitors wishing to learn more about the area can attend educational programs in summer and fall.

    Natural Features

    The campground is located in Pisgah National Forest at an elevation of 2,150 feet. The surrounding land boasts mile-high peaks, cascading waterfalls and slopes thickly forested with hardwoods and conifers. The group camping area is adjacent to the beautiful Davidson River.

    Nearby Attractions

    Several natural and cultural attractions are within close proximity to the campground. Sliding Rock, Looking Glass Falls and the scenic Blue Ridge Parkway are among the more popular sites. The small town of Brevard offers various amenities and services, and visitors can take a trip to Asheville to visit art galleries, shops and restaurants.

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (828) 577-4558.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Any cancellations must be taken care of directly with recreation.gov. Note that this facility does not provide refunds for No Shows or incliment weather.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents

    $35 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    2.

    Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    119 Reviews
    473 Photos
    990 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Overview

    Located eight miles from Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Elkmont Campground is the largest and busiest campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. At an elevation of 2,150 feet, the area enjoys a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers.

    Recreation

    The Little River runs through the campground offering visitors the option to camp waterfront. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the Little River and countless other streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Elkmont Campground. The nearby and popular Laurel Falls Trail leads to a spectacular 80-ft. waterfall. Hiking and fishing are not the only reasons for visiting the Smokies: Picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are popular activities. With around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies are the most biologically-diverse area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    The Little River runs through the campground offering visitors the option to camp waterfront. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the Little River and countless other streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Elkmont Campground. The nearby and popular Laurel Falls Trail leads to a spectacular 80-ft. waterfall. Hiking and fishing are not the only reasons for visiting the Smokies: Picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are popular activities. With around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies are the most biologically-diverse area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Natural Features

    Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Little River and Jakes Creek run through the campground, offering easy access for fishing or cool summertime splashing. Trailheads for Little River Trail, Jakes Creek Trail, and Elkmont Nature Trail are located adjacent to the campground. Historic remnants of Little River Lumber Company's logging camp and old buildings from the Elkmont resort community offer campers a glimpse of life at Elkmont nearly a century ago.

    Nearby Attractions

    Gatlinburg, one of the Smokies' most famous tourist towns, is located about nine miles from Elkmont and offers organized rafting trips, museums, restaurants, galleries, an aquarium, skiing and more.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    3.

    Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    51 Reviews
    433 Photos
    408 Saves
    Cherokee, North Carolina

    Overview

    Situated in the stunning Great Smoky Mountains National Park, this sunny group camp offers an ideal setting for camping excursions. Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World-renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian culture, this is America's most visited national park.

    Recreation

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails, including The Smokemont Loop Trail and the Bradley Fork Trail, accessible from the camp. But hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. The nearby Bradley Fork River provides a great place to splash in the stream or fish for trout. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies have the most biological diversity of any area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails, including The Smokemont Loop Trail and the Bradley Fork Trail, accessible from the camp. But hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. The nearby Bradley Fork River provides a great place to splash in the stream or fish for trout. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies have the most biological diversity of any area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Natural Features

    Smokemont Group Camp is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges, blanketed in wildflowers during the spring and bursting with vivid foliage in the fall. At 2,200 feet, Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Great Smoky Mountains National Park preserves a rich cultural history of Southern Appalachia. From the pre-historic Paleo Indians to early 19th century European settlers, the park strives to protect the historic structures, landscapes and artifacts that tell the stories of the people who once called these mountains home.

    Nearby Attractions

    The adjacent Smokemont Campground provides additional camping facilities for smaller groups. The Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Oconaluftee Indian Village and Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, located six miles away in Cherokee, North Carolina, provides cultural and historical information about the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Cherokee also provides grocery stores and fuel.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Customers who cancel a group overnight facility reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian

    $50 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Powhatan Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Powhatan Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Powhatan Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Powhatan Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Powhatan Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Lake Powhatan Campground

    4.

    Lake Powhatan Campground

    60 Reviews
    188 Photos
    848 Saves
    Enka, North Carolina

    Overview

    Located just minutes from the popular city of Asheville, North Carolina, Lake Powhatan Glamping is the perfect, all inclusive getaway. The campground is convenient to a variety of cultural and natural attractions, including art and music venues, shopping, breweries, restaurants, and scenic drives on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Onsite you'll enjoy numerous hiking and biking trails as well as lakeside recreational opportunities. Learn more to prepare for your trip HERE .__ The custom designed glamping sites are brand new at Lake Powhatan! Choose one of 12 fully furnished canvas platform tents in the heart of the national forest for your next mountain adventure. Experience nature and outdoor recreation without sacrificing the comforts and luxuries of home. Learn more about glamping near Asheville .

    Recreation

    Visitors have a number of different activities to choose from. Kids love the lake's sandy swimming beach and anglers enjoy the calm waters for trout fishing. The French Broad River, popular for fishing, wading and tubing is also nearby. The use of personal watercraft in the lake is STRICTLY PROHIBITED due to potential introduction of foreign material to the Lake Powhatan riprarian ecosystem.__ The forest is known for its hiking and mountain biking trails (44 miles of them!), several of which are located near the campground.__

    Facilities

    Visitors have a number of different activities to choose from. Kids love the lake's sandy swimming beach and anglers enjoy the calm waters for trout fishing. The French Broad River, popular for fishing, wading and tubing is also nearby. The use of personal watercraft in the lake is STRICTLY PROHIBITED due to potential introduction of foreign material to the Lake Powhatan riprarian ecosystem.__ The forest is known for its hiking and mountain biking trails (44 miles of them!), several of which are located near the campground.__

    Natural Features

    The campground is situated in a heavily wooded area on the banks of Lake Powhatan in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina. The elevation is 2,200 feet. The surrounding land boasts mile-high peaks, cascading waterfalls and slopes thickly forested with hardwoods and conifers.

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (828) 577-7278.

    Nearby Attractions

    Among the more popular nearby destinations are Sliding Rock, Looking Glass Falls, the scenic Blue Ridge Parkway, The NC Arboretum and the Biltmore Estate.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $100 - $130 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground

    5.

    Greenbrier Campground

    69 Reviews
    222 Photos
    655 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Greenbrier Campground TN is surrounded by the Little Pigeon River and offer RV sites, tent camping, RV rentals, cabins, and bell tents. Located only 6 miles from downtown Gatlinburg and 8 miles from the entrance to the GSMNP, we are convenient to all area attractions.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $35 - $258 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Mount Pisgah Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Mount Pisgah Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Mount Pisgah Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Mount Pisgah Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Mount Pisgah Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Mount Pisgah Campground

    6.

    Mount Pisgah Campground

    40 Reviews
    93 Photos
    547 Saves
    Mills River, North Carolina

    Overview

    One of the most popular of the Parkway's campgrounds, Mount Pisgah Campground is perched in the rolling mountains of western North Carolina on the southernmost end of the famous Blue Ridge Parkway. Surrounded by dense hardwood forests at an elevation of 4980 feet, it offers shady, cool respite from the summer heat. Whichever end of the day appeals, spectacular sunrise and sunset panoramic views can be enjoyed from nearby overlooks. Several popular hiking trails, ranging from moderate to strenuous, are accessible from the campground. Drenched in history, this area was once part of the holdings of George Vanderbilt and the site of his hunting camp house, Buck Springs (no longer standing), is close by.

    Recreation

    Several popular hiking trails, ranging from moderate to difficult, are easily accessible from the campground. The Frying Pan Trail leads adventurers 1.6 miles (2.6 km) south to the Fire Tower at Frying Pan Mountain. Hiking north on the trail you'll arrive at the Pisgah Inn and from there, the Buck Spring Trail leads visitors through the thick hardwood forest and along rocky terrain to the Mt. Pisgah Parking Area. From the parking area it is a 1.6 mile (2.6 km) uphill trek to the top of Mt. Pisgah. The Shut-In Trail is the original route from the Biltmore Estate to the Buck Spring Lodge, and heads north along the Blue Ridge Parkway toward Asheville. The Buck Spring Lodge was a mountain getaway for George Vanderbilt, owner of the famous Biltmore Estate. The North Carolina Mountains to Sea Trail follows both the Buck Spring and Shut-In Trails, and connects to trails in Pisgah National Forest.

    Facilities

    Several popular hiking trails, ranging from moderate to difficult, are easily accessible from the campground. The Frying Pan Trail leads adventurers 1.6 miles (2.6 km) south to the Fire Tower at Frying Pan Mountain. Hiking north on the trail you'll arrive at the Pisgah Inn and from there, the Buck Spring Trail leads visitors through the thick hardwood forest and along rocky terrain to the Mt. Pisgah Parking Area. From the parking area it is a 1.6 mile (2.6 km) uphill trek to the top of Mt. Pisgah. The Shut-In Trail is the original route from the Biltmore Estate to the Buck Spring Lodge, and heads north along the Blue Ridge Parkway toward Asheville. The Buck Spring Lodge was a mountain getaway for George Vanderbilt, owner of the famous Biltmore Estate. The North Carolina Mountains to Sea Trail follows both the Buck Spring and Shut-In Trails, and connects to trails in Pisgah National Forest.

    Natural Features

    Mount Pisgah is part of the Appalachian Mountain Range, an area of the country with scenery that never disappoints, whether blanketed in wildflowers in the spring or bursting with red, orange, and yellow hues in the fall. The Blue Ridge Parkway is a scenic byway that follows the high crests of the central and southern Appalachians for 469 miles from Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. At an elevation of 4,980 feet (1,518 m), Mount Pisgah offers moderate to cool temperatures during camping seasons.

    Nearby Attractions

    The beautiful Pisgah Inn is located adjacent to the campground and offers a restaurant and country store. Additionally, historic Asheville, North Carolina is about 20 miles away, offering grocery stores, fuel and medical facilities.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    7.

    Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    31 Reviews
    186 Photos
    228 Saves
    Maggie Valley, North Carolina

    Overview

    Cataloochee campground is located in the historic Cataloochee Valley--a relatively remote part of Smoky Mountain National Park. The secluded setting offers visitors the ability to enjoy a multitude of recreational activities like hiking and fishing, without the crowds, which are sometimes common in other parts of the park.

    Recreation

    The Cataloochee Valley features an extensive trail system that is less heavily used compared to other areas of the park. The two main trails, Caldwell Fork and nearby Rough Fork Trail, run mostly parallel to one another in the central portion of the valley. Either of these trails extend alongside scenic creeks and streams and support both hikers and horeseback riders. For hikers only, the 3.9-mile Boogerman Trail forms a nice loop off the Caldwell Fork Trail and is less than a mile walk from the campground. Anglers will agree that some of the best Rainbow and Brook trout fishing in the area can be found in the Cataloochee Basin, one of the most remote sections of the park. Fly fishing is particularly good during spring months when aquatic insects hatch in large numbers. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park. A handful of which can be found in the Cataloochee Valley, including the nearby Palmer House, built in 1869, which contains a self-guided museum.

    Facilities

    The Cataloochee Valley features an extensive trail system that is less heavily used compared to other areas of the park. The two main trails, Caldwell Fork and nearby Rough Fork Trail, run mostly parallel to one another in the central portion of the valley. Either of these trails extend alongside scenic creeks and streams and support both hikers and horeseback riders. For hikers only, the 3.9-mile Boogerman Trail forms a nice loop off the Caldwell Fork Trail and is less than a mile walk from the campground. Anglers will agree that some of the best Rainbow and Brook trout fishing in the area can be found in the Cataloochee Basin, one of the most remote sections of the park. Fly fishing is particularly good during spring months when aquatic insects hatch in large numbers. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park. A handful of which can be found in the Cataloochee Valley, including the nearby Palmer House, built in 1869, which contains a self-guided museum.

    Natural Features

    Cataloochee Campground is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges and pristine mountain streams, like nearby Cataloochee Creek. Elk are common in this part of the park, during the spring and fall. At a 2,600 foot elevation, Cataloochee provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Whether blanketed in bright spring wildflowers or exploding with vivid fall colors, the scenery at Cataloochee never disappoints.

    Nearby Attractions

    A number of the park's famous historical buildings, including the Steve Woody and Caldwell Houses, both built in the late 19th-century, are nearby the campground. The Steve Woody House, built in 1880, is located along the Rough Fork trail, an easy 2-mile roundtrip hike from the parking lot at the end of Ranger Station Road.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Indian Creek Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Indian Creek Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Indian Creek Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Indian Creek Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Indian Creek Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Indian Creek Campground

    8.

    Indian Creek Campground

    24 Reviews
    73 Photos
    480 Saves
    Cherokee, North Carolina

    Welcome to Indian Creek Campground, nestled near Cherokee, NC. This place is a real treat for anyone looking to unwind in nature. The campground is open from March to October 31, so you've got plenty of time to plan your visit.

    One of the standout features here is the creek that winds its way through the campground. Many of the campsites are right along the water, offering a soothing soundtrack of flowing water to lull you to sleep. If you're into fishing, you can even cast a line right from your campsite with a Reservation Fishing permit.

    The campground offers a mix of tent, RV, cabin, and glamping accommodations, so there's something for everyone. The sites are well-maintained, with amenities like electric and water hookups, showers, and clean bathrooms. There's also a well-stocked camp store that has everything you might need, from firewood to citronella candles to keep those pesky no-see-ums at bay.

    Pets are welcome, so feel free to bring your furry friends along. Just make sure to keep them on a leash and clean up after them. Fires are allowed, and you can buy kiln-dried wood at the store, which they'll even deliver to your site.

    For those who love a bit of adventure, the nearby Mingo Falls is a must-see. It's a short hike, but the view of the waterfall is absolutely worth it. And if you're into tubing, Smokey Mountain Tubing in Cherokee is a great way to spend a day.

    Visitors have praised the friendly and helpful staff, the peaceful atmosphere, and the beautiful, secluded sites. Whether you're here for a weekend getaway or a longer stay, Indian Creek Campground offers a perfect escape into nature.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $26 - $37 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    9.

    Balsam Mountain Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    25 Reviews
    119 Photos
    217 Saves
    Maggie Valley, North Carolina

    Overview

    Balsam Mountain Campground is located in a relatively remote part of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The secluded setting offers visitors the ability to enjoy a multitude of recreational activities without the crowds which are sometimes common in other parts of the park.

    Recreation

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks. The Balsam Mountain area features several trails that are less heavily used compared to other areas of the park. The campground offers a short nature trail located beside site 43. The hiker only Flat Creek Trail is a pleasant walk through a hardwood forest. For the adventurous hiker the Hemphill Bald and Rough Fork trails provide a 14-mile loop hike, with outstanding views and old growth trees. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Anglers will agree that some of the best trout fishing in the area can be found along the Balsam Mountain and Straight Fork Roads, some of the most remote sections of the park. Fly fishing is particularly good during spring months when aquatic insects hatch in large numbers. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it is not uncommon for visitors to spot one. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures have been preserved in the park. For the auto touring enthusiast, the 14-mile Heintooga Round Bottom Road, a one-way unimproved gravel drive, offers spectacular scenery with mountain vistas and the occasional bear or elk sighting. Buses, motorhome, vans longer than 25' and any vehicle towing a trailer are prohibited on this road.

    Facilities

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks. The Balsam Mountain area features several trails that are less heavily used compared to other areas of the park. The campground offers a short nature trail located beside site 43. The hiker only Flat Creek Trail is a pleasant walk through a hardwood forest. For the adventurous hiker the Hemphill Bald and Rough Fork trails provide a 14-mile loop hike, with outstanding views and old growth trees. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Anglers will agree that some of the best trout fishing in the area can be found along the Balsam Mountain and Straight Fork Roads, some of the most remote sections of the park. Fly fishing is particularly good during spring months when aquatic insects hatch in large numbers. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it is not uncommon for visitors to spot one. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures have been preserved in the park. For the auto touring enthusiast, the 14-mile Heintooga Round Bottom Road, a one-way unimproved gravel drive, offers spectacular scenery with mountain vistas and the occasional bear or elk sighting. Buses, motorhome, vans longer than 25' and any vehicle towing a trailer are prohibited on this road.

    Natural Features

    Balsam Mountain Campground is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges and pristine mountain streams. Elk are common in this part of the park during the spring and fall. Located at 5,310 feet elevation, Balsam Mountain's daytime temperatures rarely exceed 70 degrees F and night time temperatures may dip into the low 50's.

    Nearby Attractions

    Nearby attractions include: Maggie Valley, NC, Cherokee, NC, the Oconaluftee Visitor Center, the Mountain Farm Museum, the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Nantahala Outdoor Center, the Bryson City Railway and Asheville, NC

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Cades Cove Campground

    10.

    Cades Cove Campground

    93 Reviews
    529 Photos
    586 Saves
    Townsend, Tennessee

    Cades Cove Campground, located near Townsend, TN, is a fantastic spot for those looking to immerse themselves in the beauty of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Open from March 11 to October 31, this campground offers a range of accommodations including tent sites, RV spots, cabins, and even glamping options.

    One of the standout features here is the proximity to the Cades Cove Loop, a scenic drive that’s a hit with visitors. You can expect to see plenty of wildlife, including turkeys, bears, and coyotes. The campground itself is pretty quiet, especially at night, making it a great place to hear the sounds of nature.

    The campground has flush toilets, potable water at the toilet facilities, and a sanitary dump station. While there are no showers or sewer hookups, the convenience of having a camp store on-site makes up for it. You can grab essentials like firewood and ice without having to leave the campground.

    For those who love biking, the campground offers bike rentals, and the loop is perfect for a leisurely ride. If hiking is more your speed, there are plenty of trails nearby to explore. Just be aware that cell service is spotty, so it’s a good idea to bring a book or download some shows ahead of time.

    Visitors have mentioned that the sites are a bit close together, but the overall experience of being so close to nature more than makes up for it. Whether you’re here for a weekend getaway or a longer stay, Cades Cove Campground provides a great base for exploring the Smokies.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • RVs

    $30 / night

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Frequently Asked Questions

Which is the most popular rv campsite near Balsam, NC?

According to TheDyrt.com, the most popular rv campground near Balsam, NC is Davidson River Campground with a 4.6-star rating from 79 reviews.

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