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Top Dispersed Camping near Eastman Lake

Searching for a dispersed campsite near Eastman Lake? Dispersed camping is the perfect way to get off the grid. You're sure to find the perfect dispersed campsite for your California camping adventure.

Best Dispersed Camping Sites Near Eastman Lake, CA (36)

    Camper-submitted photo from Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site

    1.

    Goat Meadow - Dispersed Camp Site

    23 Reviews
    40 Photos
    755 Saves
    Fish Camp, California

    Dispersed Camping is allowed in the National Forest except in the area surrounding Huntington Lake, Shaver Lake, Bass Lake, Redinger Lake, and the Merced River Canyon. Campfire permits are required at all times whenever you plan to have a fire on public land outside of a developed campground. When building a fire please remember to only pick up down and dead wood that is no larger than wrist size and to never leave a campfire unattended.

    You can obtain a campfire permit at any Forest office or online at www.prevetnwildfireca.org. Be sure to check and see if campfire restrictions are in effect, when campfire restrictions are in place you will not be able to make a fire in dispersed camping areas (Developed Designated Campgrounds Only) but, you will be able to operate gas stoves, and lanterns with your permit.

    When camping in the Forest proper food storage is also required either using a bear box, or by the proper use of the counter balance method. While camping anywhere in the forest also keep in mind that there are other people in the forest and we advise you to respect them and their space.

    You may stay at one campsite for a limit of 14 days and you may stay on each district for a limit of 21 days before we will ask you to vacate. Please follow ENVUM maps for all designated roads and vehicle limitations.

    We ask you to always remember to pack out what you pack in. Human waste needs to be buried 6 to 8 inches deep. For any other questions about visiting and camping in the forest and in the wilderness please visit LeaveNoTrace.org.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    Camper-submitted photo from Hardin Flat Road
    Camper-submitted photo from Hardin Flat Road
    Camper-submitted photo from Hardin Flat Road
    Camper-submitted photo from Hardin Flat Road
    Camper-submitted photo from Hardin Flat Road
    Camper-submitted photo from Hardin Flat Road
    Camper-submitted photo from Yosemite “Boondock National” Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Yosemite “Boondock National” Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Yosemite “Boondock National” Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Yosemite “Boondock National” Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Yosemite “Boondock National” Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Yosemite “Boondock National” Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Bridgeport Travertine Hot Springs Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Bridgeport Travertine Hot Springs Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Bridgeport Travertine Hot Springs Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Bridgeport Travertine Hot Springs Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Bridgeport Travertine Hot Springs Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Bridgeport Travertine Hot Springs Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping

    5.

    Inyo National Forest Dispersed Camping

    12 Reviews
    34 Photos
    686 Saves
    June Lake, California

    Many people enjoy the solitude and primitive experience of camping away from developed campgrounds and other campers. Dispersed camping is the term used for camping anywhere in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Dispersed camping means no services, such as trash removal, tables, or toilets. There are extra responsibilites and skills that are necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resources scenic and unspoiled for other campers.

    Most of the land in Inyo and Mono counties is publicly owned. Dispersed camping (camping outside of designated campgrounds) is allowed throughout much of the area. If you plan to backpack into a wilderness area to camp, you will need a wilderness permit, issued at Inyo National Forest visitor centers. If you wish to camp outside of developed campgrounds/sites, there are a few things you need to know:

    Land Ownership: The three major land-owning agencies in the Eastern Sierra are the Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the City of Los Angeles. Dispersed camping is allowed on most Forest Service and BLM land. However, camping is prohibited on land owned by the City of Los Angeles.

    Maps: Anyone planning a dispersed camping trip should invest in a copy of the Inyo National Forest map, which depicts land ownership as well as roads, streams, trails and other features. The map also shows “restricted use areas” where dispersed camping is not allowed.

    Restricted Use Areas: Certain high-use recreation zones, including those along paved roads leading into the mountains, are not open to dispersed camping (see Inyo National Forest map). Dispersed camping is not allowed in the following areas: Horseshoe Meadow, Onion Valley, Big Pine Creek, Bishop Creek, Rock Creek, McGee Creek, Convict Lake, Mammoth Lakes, Reds Meadow Valley, June Lakes Loop, Lee Vining Canyon, Lundy Canyon, Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, and any research area.

    Owens River: All land along the Owens River is owned by the City of Los Angeles, and is closed to camping.

    Length of Stay: On Inyo National Forest land, you may camp up to 28 days per six months on any one ranger district (there are 4 ranger districts on the Inyo –Mt. Whitney, White Mountain, Mammoth, and Mono Lake). Always check with your local ranger station.

    Locating a Dispersed Campsite: Look for an area at the end of a spur road or a pullout that is clear of vegetation and has a hard, compacted surface. These sites might have a primitive fire ring. Stay on established roadways; do not drive off-road to camp. Try to select a campsite at least 100 feet from lakes and streams.

    Campfires and Fire Permits: If you plan to build a campfire or use a barbeque or camp stove, you must obtain a campfire permit from a Forest Service, BLM, or CalFire office. You must have a shovel and a container of water (for drowning the fire). Clear an area least 5 feet wide all the way around your fire ring down to mineral soil. During times of high fire danger, camp fires are prohibited; always check with the local fire office or ranger station for fire restrictions.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Lake South Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Lake South Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Lake South Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Lake South Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Lake South Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Lake South Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Green Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Green Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Green Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Green Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Green Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Green Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Leavitt Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Leavitt Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Forest Route 4N39 Dispersed

    9.

    Forest Route 4N39 Dispersed

    1 Review
    1 Photo
    51 Saves
    Stanislaus National Forest, California

    Many people enjoy the solitude and primitive experience of camping away from developed campgrounds and other campers. Dispersed camping is the term used for camping anywhere in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Dispersed camping means no services like trash removal, and few or no facilities such as tables and fire pits, are provided.

    Dispersed camping takes a lot more effort than camping in a developed campground, but for those with an adventurous spirit, it can be a lot of fun.

    Here are some important points to remember about dispersed camping:

    The maximum length of stay in a forest ranger district is 21 days per year. Please practice good outdoor ethics about camping, travel and behavior while visiting. Dispersed campers are allowed to park within one vehicle length (including any tow vehicle) of a National Forest transportation route and walk into camp. Dispersed camping is not permitted in developed campgrounds and day use areas. Other areas closed to dispersed camping include historical and archaeological sites. Also, be certain that you are within the boundaries of the National Forest before setting up camp. To prevent resource damage please keep your campsite within 150 feet from a roadway. Dispersed camping is not allowed in these areas: within one mile of Pinecrest Basin along 7N83, Clark Fork Road along Hwy 108 between Clark Fork Road and Kennedy Meadows Road Leave No Trace Camping – Camp so no one notices you while you are there, and no one even knows you were there after you leave. Please respect nature and other visitors by keeping noise to a minimum. Always pack out whatever you pack in. No permanent structures are to be constructed to an area, such as building rock-lined fire pits, trenches around tents, or carving into trees. Human waste should be deposited in a hole dug 6 - 10 inches deep and then covered with organic soil. Vehicles are not permitted off of roads, but if you can safely park your vehicle adjacent and parallel to the road and are not blocking the roadway, you may park and camp. Most sites will have a parking spot nearby while other sites may not. Because the footprint of a vehicle can have a large impact to soils, please do not create new “parking spot” for a campsite. Please park in designated or already impacted spots. If you are going to an area where others have camped before, pick a site that has been used before. Plants, soil and wildlife are impacted by new campsites so using existing ones will minimize your impact in the forest.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site
    Camper-submitted photo from Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site

    10.

    Mono Basin Dispersed Camp Site

    6 Reviews
    19 Photos
    151 Saves
    Lee Vining, California

    Dispersed camping is allowed on public land in the Mono Basin—the Jeffrey pine forest off of Highway 120 east is a recommended dispersed camping area. If you plan on having a campfire, propane stove, lantern, or any open flame, you must obtain a permit. Camping is allowed on the exposed lakebed surrounding Mono Lake by permit only. Camping on the islands in Mono Lake is allowed by permit only, except during April through August when the islands are closed to all boaters. Dispersed camping is prohibited in developed recreation areas such as South Tufa, Navy Beach, Old Marina, and County Park. Permits are available free-of-charge at the Mono Basin National Forest Scenic Area Visitor Center

    • Pets
    • Phone Service
    • Tents
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol
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144 Reviews of 36 Eastman Lake Campgrounds