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Camping

Established Camping

Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park

Warning 2 Alerts are In Effect

There are 2 alerts for this campground. Camp safely!

Fall is the season where bears become very focused on finding food to gain fat storage to survive winter. Visitors have recently reported black bears entering Chisos Mountains campsites while visitors were present. Please remember the following when camping in bear country: <ul> <li>Keep a clean camp.</li> <li>Store food, cooking equipment, and scented items in bear boxes when not in use.</li> <li>Do not leave water out unattended.</li> <li>Collapse your tent during the day if you are not in the campsite.</li> <li>If a bear approaches you:</li> <ul> <li>Group together and pick up small children.</li> <li>Stand tall, appear large, wave arms or jacket.</li> <li>Scare the bear away by shouting and throwing small sticks or rocks.</li> <li>Fight back aggressively if the bear attacks.</li> </ul> </ul>

This is the season bears begin avtively foraging to put on weight for the upcoming season. Visitors have recently reported black bears entering Chisos Mountains campsites while visitors were present. Please remember the following when camping in bear country: <ul> <li>Keep a clean camp.</li> <li>Store food, cooking equipment, and scented items in bear boxes when not in use.</li> <li>Do not leave water out unattended.</li> <li>Collapse your tent during the day if you are not in the campsite.</li> <li>If a bear approaches you:</li> <ul> <li>Group together and pick up small children.</li> <li>Stand tall, appear large, wave arms or jacket.</li> <li>Scare the bear away by shouting and throwing small sticks or rocks.</li> <li>Fight back aggressively if the bear attacks.</li> </ul> </ul>

About

National Park Service

Big Bend National Park

Overview

Big Bend's vast undeveloped areas provide excellent opportunities for backcountry experiences if you seek solitude, wilderness, and adventure!__The backcountry sites listed here are primitive backcountry road campsites and primitive backpacking sites in the Chisos Mountains. All are designated sites located in remote locations. Campers must be self-sufficient.__Visit the park's Backcountry Use web page to learn about proper planning and trip preparation for this remote area. Backcountry Regulations are strictly enforced.______ These are primitive sites and do not offer water, electricity, toilet access, or any amenities.__ Primitive Chisos campsites are BACKPACK-ONLY campsites with NO vehicle access. Campsites are from 1-6 miles (1.6 to 10 km) from the trailhead.__Maximum group size is 15 people. Overnight backpackers may park in the large amphitheater lot adjacent to the Chisos Basin Campground. Most primitive roadside campsites require a high clearance vehicle. The park highly recommends a four wheel drive vehicle. Road conditions can change quickly.__High clearance vehicles are defined as an SUV or truck with at least 15 inch (38 cm) tire rims AND at least 8 inches (20 cm) of ground clearance from the lowest point of the frame, body, or suspension.__

Recreation

Splendid Isolation! Big Bend National Park is beloved as one of the few large public land areas in Texas. Major activities include camping, backpacking, hiking, birdwatching, river trips, enjoying the spring bloom, and adventuring along backcountry roads. The spring months of March and April are the busiest, as well as the Thanksgiving and New Year___s holidays, although the park is open and visited year round.

Facilities

Splendid Isolation! Big Bend National Park is beloved as one of the few large public land areas in Texas. Major activities include camping, backpacking, hiking, birdwatching, river trips, enjoying the spring bloom, and adventuring along backcountry roads. The spring months of March and April are the busiest, as well as the Thanksgiving and New Year___s holidays, although the park is open and visited year round.

Natural Features

From an elevation of less than 1,800 feet (550 m) along the Rio Grande to nearly 8,000 feet (2438 m) in the Chisos Mountains, Big Bend includes massive canyons, vast desert expanses, forested mountains, and an ever-changing river. Here you can explore one of the last remaining wild corners of the United States__

Nearby Attractions

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Location

Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park is located in Texas

Detail location of campground

Directions

Big Bend National Park is located in West Texas, a considerable distance from cities and transportation hubs. While the isolation of Big Bend is a draw for many visitors, it also means you must be well prepared for and carefully plan your trip. There is no public transportation to or within Big Bend National Park. Several highways lead to Big Bend National Park: TX 118 from Alpine to Study Butte or FM 170 from Presidio to Study Butte (then 26 miles (42 km) east to park headquarters) or US 90 or US 385 to Marathon (then 70 miles/113 km) south to park headquarters).__ Visit the park's Directions &amp; Transportation web page for details. Distances between towns and services are considerable. Be sure you have plenty of gas, oil, food, and water for your trip. The park has four camp stores, but supply and selection can be limited. There are also small stores in the communities outside the park. The last major shopping areas (grocery and hardware stores) are Alpine, Fort Stockton, and Del Rio. Each backcountry campsite is in a remote area of the park. Check the site listing for your reservation for detailed directions on how to get to that specific site.__ If you are staying in a backpacking site, park in the Chisos Basin amphitheater parking area, located near the Chisos Basin campground.

Address

PO BOX 129
Big bend national park, TX 79834

Coordinates

29.3278148953683 N
103.205955800996 W

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Access

  • Drive-In
    Park next to your site
  • Walk-In
    Park in a lot, walk to your site.
  • Hike-In
    Backcountry sites.

Stay Connected

  • WiFi
    Good
  • Verizon
    Available
  • AT&T
    Available
  • T-Mobile
    Available

Site Types

  • Tent Sites
  • RV Sites

Features

For Campers

  • Pets

For Vehicles

  • Water Hookups

Reviews

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9 Reviews

Shana D.The Dyrt PRO User
Reviewed May. 30, 2023

Amazing!

So many great back country campsites in Big Bend! The park is massive and I appreciate the many options that are provided for people to get out of the RV campgrounds and out in solitude. . Every campsite we saw in the back country had a bear box on site. Obviously no other facilities.

Sitecamp de Leon
Month of VisitMay
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Shana D., May 30, 2023
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Shana D., May 30, 2023
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Shana D., May 30, 2023
  • (10) View All
Charly S.
Reviewed Oct. 25, 2022

It was a strenuous hike, but worth it!!

I went here in November 2020. It was a one of a kind experience! I saw lots of wildlife- javelinas, coyotes, some beautiful birds, and even a BEAR!! I stayed at Pinnacles 3. It was a steep uphill 3.8 mile hike. Very difficult, but so rewarding! Stunning views!

Sitepinnacles 3
Month of VisitDecember
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Charly S., October 25, 2022
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Charly S., October 25, 2022
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Charly S., October 25, 2022
  • (17) View All
skyler H.
Reviewed Sep. 12, 2022

Back country camping

I definitely enjoyed this type of camping because of the insanely beautiful view! But, we went over the summer and of course we were miserable from the heat. So, I recommend going during cooler months

Sitela noria 2
Month of VisitJuly
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by skyler H., September 12, 2022
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by skyler H., September 12, 2022
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by skyler H., September 12, 2022
  • (4) View All
Emily C.
Reviewed Jul. 24, 2022

Short hike and large camping area

This was our first experience with hike-in backcountry camping, and some of us struggled with the short hike to this spot but it was well worth it. The trailhead and parking area is a little difficult to find, but there are bathrooms and an information area right beside it. We made the reservation a few months before and most sites were already booked. The hike had wonderful views and so did our campsite, which was very large and could’ve fit many more than the 3 tents we had with us. A food locker was available and we did fine without a propane fire set-up, eating our food cold. We brought plenty of water to be sure we’d have enough.

Siteboulder meadow 1
Month of VisitJanuary
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Emily C., July 24, 2022
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Emily C., July 24, 2022
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Emily C., July 24, 2022
  • (4) View All
Rae T.
Reviewed Aug. 29, 2021

Chisos Campground

Majestic!

SiteGrapevine
Month of VisitSeptember
Rae T.
Reviewed Aug. 29, 2021

Grapevine Trail

It was very peaceful and spacious. Beautiful scenery in front of the mountains.

SiteGrapevine Trail
Month of VisitSeptember
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Rae T., August 29, 2021
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Rae T., August 29, 2021
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Rae T., August 29, 2021
michael
Reviewed Jul. 4, 2021

Big Bend NP, Robbers Roost back country

It's a drove but worth the seclusion. Zero facilities, or shade, a bear box in the unlikely time a bear may be close. Make sure you can be self-sufficient, had had a great time in our GX it performed flawlessly getting to the site which actually has three "spaces". We camped in early July 2019 which was hot in the day but 70s at night. No fires and no generators so easy times and quiet peaceful sunrises and sets. Not a demanding road to get to the site but everytime it rains conditions change with washout etc. Again ZERO facilities... we had a 13 gallon water tank which was great and Panther junction where you pickup your permit has some of the best natural spring water... be prepared and enjoy!

SiteRobbers Roost
Month of VisitAugust
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by michael , July 4, 2021
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by michael , July 4, 2021
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by michael , July 4, 2021
  • (12) View All
Douglas K.
Reviewed Mar. 6, 2021

Boot Canyon 1

I went to Big Bend to do some photography. 

I arrived just before noon. The plan was to spend 2 nights camping at the Boot Canyon hike in camp ground. I planned to spend some time doing some photography. Everything I read said that you really need at least a gallon of water per person per day so I left my car at the amphitheater parking lot with 9 liters of water. 

I took the Pinnacles Trail to get to the Boot Canyon camp site. 

The hike up is beautiful. I was able to watch my progress relative to the mountains on the north-ish side of the basin (me being on the south side of the basin). 

It took me about 3-4 hours to reach the camp site. When the assent starts, it is brutal. There are a lot of switch-backs, and significant elevation is gained relatively short milage. 

Once at the top (just at the base of emory peak trail) views into Texas seem nearly endless, only limited by haze. Truly stunning views. 

From this point there is a decent for most of the rest of the trip to the Boot Canyon camping area. I stayed at Boot Canyon 1. There is a composting toilet that this camp site is closest to. There is a sign that asks that you not "pee" in the toilets. There are 2 metal containers to keep your snacks safe in the event that the javelinas or black bears decide to show up. 

When I arrived at the campsite I realized that I had consumed all but about 1.5 liters of my water that I packed in. Maps and GPS units show that there is a spring near the camp sites at boot canyon. I was unable to actually locate it though.

The site itself was well shaded. The ground is hard and I did have some extra trouble getting my tent stakes to seat securely but I did manage. Many of the spots to set down a tent were on enough of a slope that I found them unsuitable, but there were several spots that were well suited to my 2 person tent. 

After dinner I was down to just under a liter of water. This combined with the fact that I was unable to locate the spring led to my decision to not stay another night. 

I spent a couple of hours enjoying the company of some birds and then was evidently so tired that I slept fully 13 hours. I awoke to a couple of white tail deer investigating my set up, had breakfast and descended. 

Weather was good. It was sunny with mild temperatures.

The  hike  was brutal with a 50 pound pack, but it was fully with every step and the campsites are very nice. There is no water access so take in what you need.

SiteBoot Canyon 1
Month of VisitMarch
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Douglas K., March 6, 2021
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Douglas K., March 6, 2021
  • Review photo of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park by Douglas K., March 6, 2021
  • (5) View All

Frequently Asked Questions

Does Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park have RV hookups?

According to TheDyrt.com, Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park has water hookups.

What is the elevation of Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park?

Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park is located at 3734 feet.

What is the max vehicle length at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park?

Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park allows vehicles up to 30 feet.

Does Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park have wifi?

No, according to campers on TheDyrt.com, Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park does not have wifi.

Is there cell phone reception at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park?

According to campers on TheDyrt.com, Verizon signal is available, AT&T is available, and T-Mobile is available.

How hard is it to get a campsite at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park?

Some campers book as far as 6 months in advance, so on high-demand weekends it can be very difficult to get a campsite at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park. If you want to get a last-minute campsite at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park, try setting up a text message Alert at TheDyrt.com/alerts

Why is it so hard to get a campsite at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park?

There are 112 campsites at Big Bend Backcountry Camping — Big Bend National Park and over 80 million Americans who camp! Try snagging a cancellation by setting up a text message Alert at TheDyrt.com/alerts