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Blanding, UTAH
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This is a great backpacking campsite. Permit is required as are wag bags and leave no trace. I tracked it at 3 miles from Elephant Canyon trailhead. It was a 2 mile hike to Druid Arch from this site. No service and no water so plan accordingly.

Basic and beautiful

Very nice Forest Service campground! Sites are private, large, and well spaced. Lots of nearby ATV trails. We were there in early May and it was largely empty the first few nights. Great place to explore. Our only complaint is that some sites have road noise from the highway.

Also FYI there is lots of available dispersed camping if you continue past the campground entrance.

Great views, can be windy

Spent 3 nights here in 2 different locations. Loved it. Quiet, dispersed areas. Dirt road is well maintained but when it gets wet it can get muddy quick. Your on a cliff so winds can pick up. Plenty of spots for various sizes rigs. Great place to just enjoy sunrise or sunset. I've seen a few couples in tents so the wind is not that bad I guess.

Enjoyed it

My 1st stay was early February 2019 and it was 18 and 30mph winds. The van was rocking but I slept like a baby and was the only one there. Stayed again late April 2019 and it was full of RVs stacked against the edge so I parked away from them. Quiet night, warm, not windy at all. Just full of those pretentious RVers with their website plastered all over their rig taking selfies. It's quit the comedy to watch them shoot video(I presume for YT) never going further than the tourist plaque.

Quick stop

Making my away around the four corner states, needed a quick spot to pull over for the night. There’s nice secluded spots and then there’s areas for groups. Was able to let my dog off the leash and roam our campsite. There’s bathrooms about a half mile or less walk depending how far you park. Awesome sunrise and sunset.

The perfect campsite

Very clean, empty trashes, full toilet papers, and not to mention hiking trails and gorgeous views right outside your tent! We had a group of six and plenty of room with lots of memories made :)

Devil’s Kitchen

The Devil’s Kitchen is a “near” backcountry campsite. I say that this is "near" backcountry because the campsite is accessible with a 4x4 vehicle. Or one can reach it by hiking in. The main attraction of the area is of course a visit to the Devil’s Kitchen and the nearby needle formations in Chesler Park. The Devil's Kitchen is an natural alcove within some of the rock formations. You'll probably spot the latrine toilet before you spot the kitchen. Just past the latrine toilet is a huge rock overhang. Pass under the overhang and you'll enter the kitchen. It is an enclosed area shaded by the tall rock walls. The temperature and climate inside the alcove is cool and noticeably different than the temperature in the surrounding plateau area which is exposed and much warmer.

This is a backcountry campsite in The Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This is dispersed camping so there are no services nor amenities once you leave the trailhead. Leave No Trace principles apply. WAG bags required. Carry in any water that you might need because water is scarce or non-existant.

Chesler Park 2 (CP2) nestled within The Needles

This is a backcountry campsite reachable by a 4.4 miles hike from the Elephant Hill Trailhead in The Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This is dispersed camping so there are no services nor amenities once you leave the trailhead. Leave No Trace principles apply. WAG bags required. Carry in any water that you might need because water is scarce or non-existant.

The hike to the campsite is over hills, down canyons, across slick rock, traversing sand and across a plateau. The trail is marked by cairns for most of the way, but it is highly recommended that you use a topo/trail map and compass or GPS to navigate. Along the way you will see a variety of rock formations such as joints, fins and spires.

You will cross a canyon and creek where EC1, EC2 and EC3 are located. A short distance after EC3 you will see a directional sign for Druid Arch or Chesler Park. Follow the Chesler Park Trail for about 1 mile. Look for the CP2 wooden sign post along the trail. The campsite is nestled amongst some rock formations and spires. There is no water resources in the area. There is plenty of open space to set up 3-4 tents.

There are three additional site located within a mile in the NW direction. This site is nestled amongst some huge rock formations and has views of a plateau and some needles. There is a trailhead and latrine toilets about 2 miles west of this campsite. About 1.5 miles away is The Joint.

Elephant Canyon 3 (EC3)

This is a backcountry campsite reachable by a 2.5 mile hike from the Elephant Hill Trailhead in The Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This is dispersed camping so there are no services nor amenities once you leave the trailhead. Leave No Trace principles apply. WAG bags required. Carry in any water that you might need because water is scarce or non-existant.

The hike to the campsite is over hills, down canyons, across slick rock and traversing sand. The trail is marked by cairns for most of the way, but it is highly recommended that you use a topo/trail map and compass or GPS to navigate. Along the way you will see a variety of rock formations such as joints, fins and spires.

You will cross a canyon and creek where EC1 and EC2 are located. Continue past EC2 for another .25 miles. You might walk right past the campsite, but look for the EC3 wooden sign post. The campsite is nestled amongst some rock formations. The creek is below in the canyon. Don't count on any water being in the creek, it will most likely be dry. There is plenty of open space to set up 3-4 tents.

This is one of the first three campsites when entering The Needles District from the Elephant Hill Trailhead. There are two additional site located within half a mile. This site has views of a plateau and some needles. A quarter mile away the trail splits between the trail to Chesler Park and Druid Arch.

Elephant Canyon 2 (EC2)

This is a backcountry campsite reachable by a 2.5 mile hike from the Elephant Hill Trailhead in The Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This is dispersed camping so there are no services nor amenities once you leave the trailhead. Leave No Trace principles apply. WAG bags required. Carry in any water that you might need because water is scarce or non-existant.

The hike to the campsite is over hills, down canyons, across slick rock and traversing sand. The trail is marked by cairns for most of the way, but it is highly recommended that you use a topo/trail map and compass or GPS to navigate. Along the way you will see a variety of rock formations such as joints, fins and spires.

You will come to a scenic overlook of a canyon. To the right will be the trail to EC1. To the left will be the trail to EC2. You will need to cross the creek (often dry, sometimes flowing) to reach the site, When you cross the creek vear left on the trail. Walk about .25 miles and look for the wooden sign post with EC2. The site is perched on the side of the hill on a little flat area with room for 2-3 tents.

This is one of the first couple of campsites when entering The Needles District from the Elephant Hill Trailhead. There are two additional sites located within a quarter a mile. EC 1 is located about .25 miles north and EC3 is located about .25 miles southwest. This site has views of some bluffs and the creek below. There are two large spires above the campsite. When the sun is setting the bluffs directly in front of this site are illuminated.

Great little campground!

Many roads into area, all narrow, winding and potholed. Arrive well before dark as roads are also full of livestock. Clean bathroom but no showers. Lovely views all around. Dark sky activities in summer. Shelters and fire rings at all spots as well as nice tent pads. Some rv only spots. Water inside visitor center, pump out front didn't work. Free admission to Monument, $15 bucks to camp. Improvements to water and infrastructure in progress. Fees for admission coming in May 2019.

Elephant Canyon (EC1) Campground in The Needles District of Canyonlands NP

This is a backcountry campsite reachable by a 2 mile hike from the Elephant Hill Trailhead in The Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This is dispersed camping so there are no services nor amenities once you leave the trailhead. Leave No Trace principles apply. WAG bags required. Carry in any water that you might need because water is scarce or non-existant.

The hike to the campsite is over hills, down canyons, across slick rock and traversing sand. The trail is marked by cairns for most of the way, but it is highly recommended that you use a topo/trail map and compass or GPS to navigate. Along the way you will see a variety of rock formations such as joints, fins and spires.

You might catch site of the campsite from a hillside overlook, but you will need to cross the creek (often dry, sometimes flowing) to reach the site. Look for the post with EC1. The site is perched on a little ledge with room for 3-4 tents.

This is one of the first campsites when entering The Needles District from the Elephant Hill Trailhead. There are two additional site located within half a mile. This site has views of some needles, bluffs and the creek.

Canyonlands is an extended Grand Canyon, less crowded!

Definitely consider visiting Canyonlands, it's like a sister of the Grand Canyon but less crowded. There's plenty to see and do, including viewing roaming bison, looking at underpasses, and great views of the needlepoints. There's also a section where there's primitive trilobytes, and depending on when you visit, you'll be able to see the rock that appears to stand up on a tiny tip. Really worth seeing as it contains hundreds of canyons, each with different textures, depending on which side of the park you start driving into.

quiet and scenic

This is one of my favorite, lesser known camp spots and areas to explore. Valley of the Gods sits in southern Utah near Mexican Hat. The area is somewhat of a small Monument Valley. The views surrounding the campsites are of spires, towers and red rock cliffs. The best part? There are usually not many people here.

The valley and camp spots can be reached via Valley of the Gods Rd which connects highway 163 and 261. The roads can be hard to find as you will probably drive right past them. Valley of the Gods Rd is all dirt and is about 17 miles long. The drive itself is very scenic, be aware during rainy season the road can get very flooded and low clearance cars will have a hard time.

Camp spots are anywhere you want, most of them will be right off the road. Flat spots, pull offs and rock fire rings will tell you if someone has camped there before. The valley is overseen by BLM so there are no fees to camp, on the flip side of that, that means there are no toilets or any kinds of services. Some people prefer camp spots this way.

I have seen small 2 wheel drive cars to large RV's and Trailers on this road ,but like i mentioned earlier, there are big dips here and there and the rains can flood them. Use caution upon entering the Valley. Overall, amazing spots with equal scenery.

First to Review
Beautiful

Utah is one of my favorite places to visit. The hiking here is one of my favorite things to do. The Buckboard Campground was really nice to stay at because it was in a great location near lots of wonderful hikes. My family and I stayed here for 4 nights, and enjoyed hiking in the mornings. We really enjoyed our stay in this campground. One things we really appreciated was how helpful the rangers were. They put us in the right direction to our campsite as well as what good hikes were along the way. They gave us maps that were super helpful, so we definitely appreciated them and all their help. If you have any questions, I recommend asking them for help. The campground was big enough for about 50 spots, and had a few bathrooms onsite. There was also a little river that passed through on the backside of the campground. At night we could hear the rushing water which we really enjoyed. The weather was awesome when we went, and the mosquitos werent too bad. We did bring bug spray and sprayed before we went hiking. Bring your own water because there was not a water hook up available at this campground. There was a picnic table in the campsite as well as a fire ring. We used this at night to do smores, and used the table to eat our meals. The space was big enough for our truck and 2 tents. Also is dog friendly.

Lovely sites with shade & water access

It was a great decision to visit the Needles district after a few days in Island in the Sky. The landscapes were beautiful and we were lucky to nab a spot at the District Campground. The facilities were awesome - sites had some shade from being tucked into the rock formations. The restrooms were clean and had exterior space for washing dishes and water access. This would be a great place to set up shop for a few weeks and would be a great home base to explore the Needles. However, getting a site here can be tough!

Quiet, spacious and great views!

The Views is located just outside Dolores, CO with immediate access to McPhee Reservoir, Dolores River and miles of mountain bike trails. You are close enough to Durango and Cortez to get any and all necessities, but far enough away to enjoy miles of unobstructed views to the west and NO city lights to block the amazing stargazing opportunities.

The facilities are super clean, well laid out and easily accessible. The RV sites are level, spacious and very easy to park the RV.

The crew @ The Views are super friendly and Matt is a local expert on the mountain bike trails.

We loved our stay at The Views this summer and would not hesitate to stop in for more time on our next trip.

Great but small and compact

This campground does not take reservations, and is first come first serve. We arrived to the campground being full. It looked clean and well maintained. The pit toilet bathrooms were clean as well. We ended up camping down the road on an amazing primitive site, so don’t discount that as an option as well. The visitor center also has outdoor access heated bathrooms which helped relieve the stress of cold camping nights. Such a lovely park and would definitely recommend it! We saw stars for miles!

Newly remodeled and excellent modern campground

After seeing photos of the beautiful modern shade structures in a friend’s Facebook post, I knew that Hovenweep was a camping spot I should keep on my list of possibilities. Sure enough it was truly lovely and very clean. The remodel allowed for large sage bushes to remain between the level gravel camping pads so that despite the lack or large trees in this region there is still a sense of privacy between sites. The modern shade structures provide a great way to string up a lantern for your late night or a way to tie your hammock up as well. The position of the campsite on the bluff of the canyon provided a great view of the sunset as well. Clean and cared for restrooms are just a close walk on well marked paths. Highly recommend this campground. Hovenweep is a really special place!

Perfect jump off

We arrived early on a Friday and met the cheerful helpful rangers at arrival. They were very helpful and gave us directions to campsites as well as info about our checkout for our river trip on the San Juan River the next day. Campsites were clean and close to the boat ramp but also allowed for seclusion. We set up our hammocks n site #1. A short walk away was the Sand Island Petroglyph Panel. Very cool and well maintained. Our kids met us for the night and enjoyed a night camping with our darling grandbaby. Loved the area and will return.

Peaceful retreat

So peaceful and less traffic than island in the sun. Didn’t see a single tour bus. Newer bathrooms a plus. If you want to get away from it all this is it.

Night 1 of 3 Canyondland MTN biking excersion

campground is very soft great for tents. Outhouse is 1/4 mile down the hill. Great views of Needles from this point. there is shade here as well.

clean and quiet

very clean pIt toilets and well maintained campground. lots of good spots for tents with plenty of room and vegetation between providing privacy. as a solo woman traveler, it felt both safe and relatIvely quiet while not being too isolated. close to hwy 191 with a paved road throughout the campground.

So many canyons to explore

The recent is just amazing. Really hot in the summer. Kinda crowded

Only services for miles!

Great place if campsites nearby are full or you want to guarantee a spot. Small store if you forget something. 

Others have mentioned the bathroom issues, which weren't great, but it's a campground, in the desert, water is a limited resource out there.

Great spot, but...

i was super excited when I arrived because it was really cute with tons of rocks to climb on and shade to hide in from the sun. We were there in July and no one was there, which was nice. But… at night time it was super windy and the sand was blowing everywhere. Just be prepared for wind and make sure you can cover your tent well and stake it down. Besides that, it is a great spot because it is cheap, $10 per night and it is only about 20 minutes from the Needles visitor center for Canyonlands National Park.

Secluded and Quiet, beautiful surrounding canyon walls

extremely tough drive and or hike in. ww took elephant hill road. this 4x4 is NO joke. high edges, steep cliffs, big boulders. tight squeezes. small wheel base lifted 4x4 preferred. we had an xterra, 08 runner, 03 tacoma (built) and 08 land cruiser. the cruiser had tough time squeezing through canyons walls. there was a section where you had to offroad backwards..wowz. wsooooooo glad to make it to camp safely. was so nervous through traversing the trails. took about 4-5 hrs to get through elephant hill road. arrived at Devils Kitchen camp 2 and 3. there are vault toilets at camp and pretty clean. took another 5 hours to get out through devils lane the next day. camped in late March, spring break week. temperature was chilly. 45 to 65 f

small, great and the overflow is even better

this is a small campground, and it is first come first serve … so plan accordingly. This is a hidden gem buried and missed among the big five … and it sits right in between the absurd contest over the designated National Monuments. The three bridges are worth the time an energy to hike into. The NPS provides a really interesting star gazing session at night. If you have a decent high clearance vehicle, the overflow area in Big Ears NM are wonderful.

We stayed at the group site near hamburger rock

We had a group site reservation though Rec.gov but do not use their longitude and latitude for your gps. If you do it will take you onto an Atv trail that looks like a road and is not clearly marked and very dangerous. However that actual campsite was awesome. There was no one for miles and our large group loved that. There is no water in the area and the ony shade was the shelter so it was hot. Its in a canyon area and gave the children alot of area to run and climb.

Pretty much perfect

Pretty rustic with pit toliets, but big beautiful sites. Solitude, nature.