Group
Tent Sites
No Fires
No Pets
Water Unknown
About Mahogany Grove

Mahogany Grove Campground is set in the beautiful Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, just 40 miles from downtown Las Vegas. Visitors enjoy hiking, horseback riding and scenic driving in this forested desert oasis.

Recreation

The North Loop-Mt. Charleston National Recreation Trail begins less than a mile away. Robber's Roost Trailhead is nearby as well. The Spring Mountains Visitor Center is a short drive from the campground, offering guided hikes and educational programs.

Facilities

The campground was reconstructed and now contains six group sites, picnic and serving tables, grills, campfire circles, and tent pads. The sites are tent only, with lot-style parking. This means there are short distances to carry equipment to the campsites. Vault toilets are provided. Roads and parking areas are paved.

Natural Features

The Spring Mountains National Recreation Area is a beautiful island in the desert, brimming with breathtaking scenery and diverse flora and fauna. The Bristlecone pine, the world's oldest organism, and the rare Mount Charleston blue butterfly are both found within the Spring Mountains.

More than 100 springs create the namesake for the mountain range, making it an ideal place to escape the heat of the city.

The campground is situated so campers are awarded sweeping views of the Spring Mountains. Stands of juniper and mountain mahogany forest the site, providing privacy from the highway but only limited shade.

Nearby Attractions

More than 60 miles of hiking and horseback riding trails crisscross the area; two trails allow mountain biking. Rock climbing, picnicking and scenic driving are popular activities.

ADA Access: N

Sites
6
Price
$67.00 - $130.00
Operator
National Forest
Access
Drive In
Features
No Electric Hookups
No Fires
No Pets
Not Reservable
No Sewer Hookups
No Showers
No Water Hookups
Location
Mahogany Grove is located in Nevada
Latitude
36.3119 N
Longitude
-115.6161 W
Get Directions
Directions
From Las Vegas, Nevada, take Highway 95 north to the junction with Highway 157/Kyle Canyon. Turn left and travel approximately 18 miles to junction with Highway 158/Deer Creek. Turn right and travel approximately 6 miles to the campground.
3 Reviews of Mahogany Grove
Mahogany Grove, group campground, NV

Newly rehabbed with six beautiful sites. Handicap accessible, large concrete gathering areas, concrete benches, fire pits, clean restrooms, water on taps, lots of asphalt parking, and educational signs about the history of the area throughout. Very close to the easy hike in Mahogany Grove, which has a wheelchair accessible section, and more interesting signs about the history of the Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) and their building of many of the recreational sites in the area.

Just far enough away

This place was beautiful. It was winter when I went so the snow was a little tough to get threw, but totally worth it! Great camping, breathtaking scapes and not that far away from the city. Lots of trails to venture on.

Ranger Review: MuckBoots Fieldblazer Boots at Mahogany Grove, Mt. Charleston Campground

Enormous group campground. Went for a family gathering. Lots of shade from the gnarly pine trees growing all over the campground. Plenty of spots to hang a hammock or put a tent. Lots of already built seating in the form of stone benches.

Vault toilets were decently clean. Water is usually available but was not when I was there. Fires were also forbidden when I was there as there because of wildfire fears.

Very close to the Mt Charleston North Loop Trail. Since I was with family I did not attempt it (it’s 10+ miles long), but we did go hike at nearby Robber’s Roost which is easy. I have done the North Loop in the past, and the Rain Tree is definitely worth seeing if you can make the hike.

Gear Review: This contains a review of MuckBoots Fieldblazer boots, which were provided to me free of charge***

I was extremely excited to win a MuckBoots giftcard from The Dyrt in the June contest for Nevada. After intense deliberation, I decided to go with the Muck Fieldblazer. Although I don’t hunt, I do stomp around in the woods near my grandmother’s in Placerville California. I have also experienced miserable wet and muddy days camping at Mt. Charleston while my socks are wet from the rain. I’ve had a few chances to test the water resistance when it rained here in Las Vegas last July. They handled the above the ankle deep running water wonderfully and kept my socks dry.

After establishing their waterproof credentials, I decided to give their wearability a try on the Robber’s Roost trail, which is about short hike up to a cave, about a mile round trip. I didn’t get any blisters, and though they were somewhat tight on my calves it didn’t cause any issues.

Overall they were excellent waterproof general use boots. Because of their size I wouldn’t take them on extended backpacking trips, but for hikes and tromping around in muddy or wet environments they are perfect.

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