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Top Tent Camping near Franklin, NC

2,897 Reviews

Looking for the best options for tent camping near Franklin? You can find tent campsites by type, including drive-in, walk-in, and even hike-in for a backpacking adventure. Would you prefer a quiet dispersed site or an established camgpround with amenities? Either way, The Dyrt makes it easy to find the perfect place to pitch your tent.

Best Tent Camping Sites Near Franklin, NC (391)

  1. Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    1.

    Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    118 Reviews
    473 Photos
    948 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Overview

    Located eight miles from Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Elkmont Campground is the largest and busiest campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. At an elevation of 2,150 feet, the area enjoys a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers.

    Recreation

    The Little River runs through the campground offering visitors the option to camp waterfront. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the Little River and countless other streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Elkmont Campground. The nearby and popular Laurel Falls Trail leads to a spectacular 80-ft. waterfall. Hiking and fishing are not the only reasons for visiting the Smokies: Picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are popular activities. With around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies are the most biologically-diverse area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    Elkmont Campground has 200 tent / RV campsites with paved driveways, gravel tent pads, fire rings, and picnic tables. Although most sites will accommodate tents or RVs, extreme slope or length of driveway make certain sites more suitable for tents than RVs. Please check the descriptions and measurements of individual sites.In addition to these tent / RV sites, Elkmont has 20 walk-in sites for tents. Campers on these beautiful wooded sites will have a short walk from their parking area to their tent pad. Nine of Elkmont's campsites are wheelchair accessible ADA sites. These sites have wide concrete driveways, raised fire rings, and wheelchair accessible picnic tables. All of these sites are located near accessible restrooms. Three of the sites provide 5 amp electrical service for medical equipment. Restrooms at Elkmont Campground have flush toilets, cold running water, and utility sinks. Potable water is available at spigots near each restroom; use of hoses is not allowed. Elkmont Campground does NOT have electric, water, or sewer hook-ups. There is no RV dump/fill station at Elkmont campground. The nearest RV dump/fill station is located across from Sugarlands Visitor Center approximately 6 miles from Elkmont. Elkmont is strictly an overnight campground; there are no day-use facilities. The nearest picnic area is Metcalf Bottoms Picnic Area, west of Elkmont on Little River Road. Due to its central location and variety of amenities, Elkmont Campground tends to be heavily used during the summer vacation months and in October. Sites along Little River are in particularly high demand. Even when Elkmont is full, campsites are often available at Cosby Campground, located at the northeast corner of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    Natural Features

    Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Little River and Jakes Creek run through the campground, offering easy access for fishing or cool summertime splashing. Trailheads for Little River Trail, Jakes Creek Trail, and Elkmont Nature Trail are located adjacent to the campground. Historic remnants of Little River Lumber Company's logging camp and old buildings from the Elkmont resort community offer campers a glimpse of life at Elkmont nearly a century ago.

    Nearby Attractions

    Gatlinburg, one of the Smokies' most famous tourist towns, is located about nine miles from Elkmont and offers organized rafting trips, museums, restaurants, galleries, an aquarium, skiing and more.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

  2. Camper-submitted photo from Black Rock Mountain State Park

    2.

    Black Rock Mountain State Park

    52 Reviews
    292 Photos
    377 Saves
    Rabun Gap, Georgia

    Situated at 3,640 feet, Black Rock Mountain State Park is Georgia’s highest park and is often home to much cooler weather than the rest of the state, offering relief for much of the year. RVers should check the weather in Clayton, GA before embarking up the steep, winding roads on icy days. With over 50 campsites and 10 cabins in Black Rock Mountain State Park, every kind of camper will find comfort.

    Though the park is named for Black Rock Mountain, it is also home to four other peaks, topping out at over 3,000 ft each. Five different hiking trails can be found within the park, providing access to the diverse wilderness of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Hop on the newest trail, the Norma Campbell Cove Trail, or opt for something more traditional like the Eastern Continental Divide. No matter what you choose, the views are sure to impress.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $30 - $150 / night

  3. Camper-submitted photo from Tallulah Gorge State Park

    3.

    Tallulah Gorge State Park

    66 Reviews
    311 Photos
    475 Saves
    Tallulah Falls, Georgia

    Tallulah Gorge State Park is designated one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia and is a great place for camping near Atlanta. Tallulah Gorge is a 2-mile-long, 1000-foot-deep canyon of metamorphic rock, where the Tallulah River tumbles over six dramatic waterfalls. This unique ecosystem is also the home to several endangered plant species, including the persistent trillium. These natural features have drawn visitors to the gorge since the early 1800s, and with the construction of the Tallulah Falls Railway in 1882, it became Georgia’s first official tourist attraction. Now the gorge is a hotspot for outdoor activity, ranging from hiking, fishing and swimming, to more adventurous pursuits, such as rock climbing and whitewater paddling.

    The best way to explore Tallulah Gorge is to camp at Tallulah Gorge State Park. Located 100 miles northeast of Atlanta, this 2700-acre park provides 50 tent and RV sites (two are ADA-accessible) on the rim of the raging river gorge. The park also has one group site, and three hike-in backcountry sites. Campsites in the park are fairly compact and close together, so don’t expect a lot of seclusion. Campground amenities include flush toilets, showers, laundry facilities and a dump station. There are also two playgrounds for the kids, picnic areas, an interpretive center, and access to a sandy beach on Tallulah Falls Lake.

    The main draw to Tallulah Gorge is hiking down to Sliding Rock at the bottom of the gorge. The park only issues 100 permits per day for this hike in order to minimize impact and maintain the canyon’s natural character. These permits are given on a first-come, first-serve basis, and cannot be reserved in advance—so get yours early! Without a permit, there are many more trails to hike along the rim of the gorge, with each offering stunning viewpoints. Don’t miss the suspension bridge on the Hurricane Falls Trail, which provides a spectacular river view from 80 feet directly above the churning waterfall.

    FUN FACT: Tallulah Gorge was used as a filming location for Marvel’s Infinity War. Eagle-eyed fans may recognize Hurricane Falls in the final battle in Wakanda.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  4. Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    4.

    Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    51 Reviews
    433 Photos
    402 Saves
    Cherokee, North Carolina

    Overview

    Situated in the stunning Great Smoky Mountains National Park, this sunny group camp offers an ideal setting for camping excursions. Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World-renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian culture, this is America's most visited national park.

    Recreation

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails, including The Smokemont Loop Trail and the Bradley Fork Trail, accessible from the camp. But hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. The nearby Bradley Fork River provides a great place to splash in the stream or fish for trout. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies have the most biological diversity of any area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    Smokemont Group Camp offers an unforgettable outdoor experience with the added convenience of flush toilets, drinking water and sinks. The campsites can accommodate up to 20 guests and provides tent pads, grills and fire rings. There is also a flat, grassy area that is perfect for group activities like football, volleyball or simply soaking up the sun.

    Natural Features

    Smokemont Group Camp is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges, blanketed in wildflowers during the spring and bursting with vivid foliage in the fall. At 2,200 feet, Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Great Smoky Mountains National Park preserves a rich cultural history of Southern Appalachia. From the pre-historic Paleo Indians to early 19th century European settlers, the park strives to protect the historic structures, landscapes and artifacts that tell the stories of the people who once called these mountains home.

    Nearby Attractions

    The adjacent Smokemont Campground provides additional camping facilities for smaller groups. The Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Oconaluftee Indian Village and Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, located six miles away in Cherokee, North Carolina, provides cultural and historical information about the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Cherokee also provides grocery stores and fuel.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Customers who cancel a group overnight facility reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian

    $50 / night

  5. Camper-submitted photo from Devils Fork State Park

    5.

    Devils Fork State Park

    46 Reviews
    213 Photos
    665 Saves
    Tamassee, South Carolina
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  6. Camper-submitted photo from Davidson River Campground

    6.

    Davidson River Campground

    79 Reviews
    236 Photos
    752 Saves
    Pisgah Forest, North Carolina

    Overview

    Davidson River Recreation Area offers camping and outdoor activities for the whole family. The campground boasts several loops of shaded campsites, as well as access to hiking trails, fishing spots, waterfalls and several nearby attractions within Pisgah National Forest. It lies just four miles west of the town of Brevard and less than an hour from the city of Asheville. The facility is open year-round. Learn more here to prepare for your trip.__

    Recreation

    The forest is known for its hiking trails, several of which are near the campground. Hikers can challenge themselves with the 12.3-mile Art Loeb Trail, the 3.7-mile North Slope Trail or a 1.5-mile walking trail. The Davidson River offers excellent trout fishing, plus tubing and swimming, which are kid-friendly favorite activities. Visitors wishing to learn more about the area can attend educational programs in summer and fall.

    Facilities

    Campsites are organized into eight loops and some are adjacent to the water. Sites are mostly shaded and equipped with picnic tables, tent pads, lantern posts and campfire rings with grills. The facility also provides hot showers and restrooms with flush toilets in each loop. Campers can purchase ice and firewood on-site and rent bikes nearby.

    Natural Features

    The campground is located in Pisgah National Forest at an elevation of 2,150 feet. The surrounding land boasts mile-high peaks, cascading waterfalls and slopes thickly forested with hardwoods and conifers. The group camping area is adjacent to the beautiful Davidson River.

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (828) 577-4558.

    Nearby Attractions

    Several natural and cultural attractions are within close proximity to the campground. Sliding Rock, Looking Glass Falls and the scenic Blue Ridge Parkway are among the more popular sites. The small town of Brevard offers various amenities and services, and visitors can take a trip to Asheville to visit art galleries, shops and restaurants.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Any cancellations must be taken care of directly with recreation.gov. Note that this facility does not provide refunds for No Shows or incliment weather.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents

    $35 / night

  7. Camper-submitted photo from Oconee State Park

    7.

    Oconee State Park

    42 Reviews
    134 Photos
    151 Saves
    Tamassee, South Carolina

    After hours of scrolling through nature photos and majestic mountains, the urge to get out and explore is hard to ignore. We applaud the explorers and adventurers of the world who brave the treacherous elements, as well as the sweet photos that come as a result. However, for many the ideal of a fun weekend away consists less of roughing it, and more relaxing on a beach or in a warm cabin. If you’re in the latter of these groups, you’re going to love Oconee State Park.

    Oconee is the idealistic place for families and friends looking for a nostalgic getaway complete with rustic charm and character. Dotted throughout the park are rustic, Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Cabins available for nightly and weekly rental. Meanwhile, a small, glassy lake lazily invites campers to disrupt its reflection with the canoes and kayaks located on shore.

    The Greenville region is known for 25+ waterfalls found throughout. Closer in, the 1,100+ acre state park hosts a number of wooded nature trails snake throughout. It also serves as the trailhead for South Carolina’s 77 miles Foothills Trail. Friends and families visiting can enjoy the local wildlife, as well as the regional flora and fauna which proudly thrive in abundance.

    In the summer Lake Oconee comes alive, creating the backdrop for unforgettable family vacations. Festivities begin in June, including Square Dancing, mini golf, pedal boating competitions, and so much more. However the Winter Months are just as enjoyable if you don’t mind getting cozy in a warm cabin, sipping some coco, and reading a good book. The rangers here are known for their hospitality, and are knowledgeable on the area. Stop in their lodge for a small convenience store, firewood, and great conversations.

    Oconee offers all the benefits of a mountain resort without the upscale pricing. There are 140+ sites available for rent, starting at just $21/night. Cabins and lodging is available but pricing is dependent on group sizes and room choice, so be sure plan out your trip in advance before coming.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  8. Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground

    8.

    Standing Indian Campground

    19 Reviews
    49 Photos
    226 Saves
    Otto, North Carolina

    Overview

    Whether traveling with an RV or tent, Standing Indian Campground is a prime place to stop for a night or spend several days in the picturesque Nantahala National Forest. The campground's many amenities provide a comfortable home base for exploring this fun and historic section of the forest. Standing Indian is located within a 20-minute drive of Franklin, North Carolina.

    Recreation

    The Standing Indian Basin is a premier hiking destination. The campground provides access to numerous trails, including the world-famous Appalachian Trail, which journeys from Georgia to Maine. Visitors who wish to get their feet wet can experience the Nantahala River, well-known for whitewater rafting, kayaking and trout fishing (fishing license required). Big and small game hunting is available in the surrounding area.

    Facilities

    The campground has four loops with sites available first-come, first-served or by reservation. Sites are equipped with campfire rings, grills, lantern posts and picnic tables, and are in close proximity to drinking water, flush toilets and showers. A dump station is nearby. The campground also has a group camping area, Kimsey Creek.

    Natural Features

    The campground is surrounded by 5,000' peaks and crossed by several natural streams. It sits at an elevation of 3,880 feet at the headwaters of the scenic Nantahala River, amidst lush forests of evergreen trees and rhododendrons.

    Charges & Cancellations

    There is not a premium type site available but there is some nonelectric double site that is $40.00 per night.

    • Pets
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $40 / night

  9. Camper-submitted photo from Greenbrier Campground

    9.

    Greenbrier Campground

    69 Reviews
    222 Photos
    633 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Greenbrier Campground TN is surrounded by the Little Pigeon River and offer RV sites, tent camping, RV rentals, cabins, and bell tents. Located only 6 miles from downtown Gatlinburg and 8 miles from the entrance to the GSMNP, we are convenient to all area attractions.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $35 - $258 / night

  10. Camper-submitted photo from Cosby Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    10.

    Cosby Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    67 Reviews
    400 Photos
    423 Saves
    Cosby, Tennessee

    Overview

    Tucked in the mountains under a canopy of cool shade beside Cosby Creek. This group campground creates a peaceful and secluded environment for visitors, offering the best that the Great Smoky Mountains National Park has to offer.

    Recreation

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Cosby Campground, including the Appalachian Trail, just three miles away via the Lower Gap Trail.Hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. White water rafting on the nearby Pigeon River. Top tourist towns of gatlinburg, Sevierville and Pigeon Forge are just 20 miles away. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy.

    Facilities

    Cosby Group Camp provides campers with a secluded environment for traditional tent camping. There are three group sites (one accessible site) that can accommodate up to 20 visitors each. Tent pads at each site, along with fire rings, grills and tables, perfect for family meals and late night s'mores.The site offers modern amenities like flush toilets and drinking water. The nearby Cosby Campground offers reservable sites and first-come, first-serve sites for smaller groups or overflow.

    Natural Features

    World-renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian culture, Great Smoky Mountains is America's most visited national park. Whether blanketed in bright wildflowers in the spring or vivid colors in the fall, the scenery at Cosby never disappoints. At 2,460 feet, Cosby Campground provides a moderate climate, typified by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Great Smoky Mountains National Park preserves a rich cultural history of Southern Appalachia. From the prehistoric Paleo Indians to the early 19th century European settlements, the park strives to protect the historic structures, landscapes and artifacts, which tell the stories of the people who once called these mountains home.

    Nearby Attractions

    Cosby, Tennessee, located about five miles from the campground, offers convenience stores and fuel. Gatlinburg, a one of the Smokies' famous tourist towns, is located about 20 miles from the site, offering visitors tours, organized rafting trips, museums, restaurants, galleries, an aquarium, skiing and more.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Customers who cancel a group overnight facility reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    • Trash

    $50 / night


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2897 Reviews of 391 Franklin Campgrounds