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Top Dispersed Camping near Mt. Hood National Forest

86 Reviews

Planning a dispersed camping trip near Mt. Hood National Forest? Find the best information on dispersed campgrounds near Mt. Hood National Forest, including photos, reviews, and tips. Search nearby dispersed campgrounds or find top-rated spots from other campers.

Best Dispersed Camping Sites Near Mt. Hood National Forest, OR (33)

  1. Camper-submitted photo from Mirror Lake

    1.

    Mirror Lake

    7 Reviews
    46 Photos
    214 Saves
    Government Camp, Oregon

    Mirror Lake offers a few sites for overnight camping. The hike to the lake is one of the most popular hikes on Mt Hood. While the vast majority of hikers only visit during the day, a few primitive sites are located just above the lake.

    When I refer to primitive sites, that is what they are. There are no facilities here. No picnic tables, and no toilets. A few fire pits have been fashioned out of rock and you may also find a makeshift bench. But for some this is an ideal camping experience. By day Mirror lake can get crowded. It is surrounded on three sides by mountains and it can get loud here. But at night it is as peaceful as you could ever want. Views of Mt Hood and Tom Dick and Harry Mountain are all outstanding.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • Picnic Table
    • Toilets
  2. Camper-submitted photo from Bonney Meadows

    2.

    Bonney Meadows

    6 Reviews
    9 Photos
    264 Saves

    A small, quiet campground with corrals, Bonney Meadows is adjacent to beautiful meadows lined with single track used by hikers, bikers and horseback riders. Campers can wake up and go for a stroll along Bonney Meadows Trail #471. Located on a high ridge near a lush meadow.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Picnic Table
    • Toilets
    • Alcohol

    $10 / night

  3. Camper-submitted photo from Mount Hood National Forest -  NF 2656 -Dispersed Camping

    3.

    Mount Hood National Forest - NF 2656 -Dispersed Camping

    5 Reviews
    14 Photos
    305 Saves
    Government Camp, Oregon

    Dispersed camping, or camping outside of designated campgrounds, can be a great way to experience the forest- as long as everyone follows some rules and guidelines to protect forest wildlife, plants, water quality, and the health of others.

    Dispersed camping is not for everyone- and that's fine as the Mt. Hood National Forest has over 70 designated campgrounds. Camping outside of campgrounds means no toilets, no drinking water, no metal fire rings, and no trash service. You are responsible for leaving the site cleaner than you found it and learning the skills of Leave No Trace camping before you head out.

    Basic Rules & Guidance Some areas are closed to dispersed camping, such as within developed recreation sites, along certain roads, and particularly sensitive areas. Contact your local Ranger District for more information. You may camp on the forest for only 14 consecutive days. Please choose an existing site rather than create a new campsite. Camp at least 100 ft. away from streams, rivers, and lakes. If you didn't bring firewood and intend to build a campfire only collect already down wood. If your campfire is too hot to touch with bare hands- it's too hot for you to leave! Bring plenty of water and a shovel to help you put out your fire. Check in advance if there are any fire restrictions in effect. Treat or filter any stream water you collect for drinking, or bring water from home. Your group must be under 75 people. If it larger you must obtain a (usually free) permit in advance from the local Ranger District. When Nature Calls Be prepared for your own sanitation! To dispose of feces, dig a hole 6” deep at least 100 feet away from any water source. When you're done, fill the hole with the dirt you dug up and take your toilet paper with you to dispose of in a proper waste container. Never defecate or leave toilet paper on top of the ground. Animals might eat it, it could easily get into the local water source and contaminate it, and plus it's just gross. Leave No Trace Pack out everything you brought with you! Dispose of your garbage properly off the forest. Leave No Trace is a framework minimum impact practices for anyone visiting the outdoors. They apply to virtually every recreational activity and help increase your safety and enjoyment of the forest. Learn more about the 7 Principles of Leave No Trace. The Mt. Hood National Forest belongs to all Americans- including those who will come long after us. Do your part to keep the forest clean every time you visit.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
  4. Camper-submitted photo from White River West Sno-Park

    4.

    White River West Sno-Park

    5 Reviews
    18 Photos
    162 Saves
    Government Camp, Oregon

    Sno Park permit required November 1 - April 30

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • Dispersed
    • Trash
  5. Camper-submitted photo from Trillium Lake Airstrip Dispersed
  6. Camper-submitted photo from Alder Flat

    6.

    Alder Flat

    4 Reviews
    15 Photos
    104 Saves
    Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon

    Parking area for 4-5 vehicles overflow on the Highway 224. Alder Flat Trail #574. Link to Trail Description and Map

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol
  7. Camper-submitted photo from Trillium Sno-Park

    7.

    Trillium Sno-Park

    3 Reviews
    2 Photos
    46 Saves
    Government Camp, Oregon

    Sno Park permit required November 1 - April 30.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol
  8. Camper-submitted photo from McNeil Point Dispersed Camping
  9. Camper-submitted photo from NF2656 - Mt. Hood Dispersed Camping

    9.

    NF2656 - Mt. Hood Dispersed Camping

    2 Reviews
    12 Photos
    77 Saves
    Government Camp, Oregon

    Dispersed camping, or camping outside of designated campgrounds, can be a great way to experience the forest- as long as everyone follows some rules and guidelines to protect forest wildlife, plants, water quality, and the health of others.

    Dispersed camping is not for everyone- and that's fine as the Mt. Hood National Forest has over 70 designated campgrounds. Camping outside of campgrounds means no toilets, no drinking water, no metal fire rings, and no trash service. You are responsible for leaving the site cleaner than you found it and learning the skills of Leave No Trace camping before you head out.

    Basic Rules & Guidance Some areas are closed to dispersed camping, such as within developed recreation sites, along certain roads, and particularly sensitive areas. Contact your local Ranger District for more information. You may camp on the forest for only 14 consecutive days. Please choose an existing site rather than create a new campsite. Camp at least 100 ft. away from streams, rivers, and lakes. If you didn't bring firewood and intend to build a campfire only collect already down wood. If your campfire is too hot to touch with bare hands- it's too hot for you to leave! Bring plenty of water and a shovel to help you put out your fire. Check in advance if there are any fire restrictions in effect. Treat or filter any stream water you collect for drinking, or bring water from home. Your group must be under 75 people. If it larger you must obtain a (usually free) permit in advance from the local Ranger District. When Nature Calls Be prepared for your own sanitation! To dispose of feces, dig a hole 6” deep at least 100 feet away from any water source. When you're done, fill the hole with the dirt you dug up and take your toilet paper with you to dispose of in a proper waste container. Never defecate or leave toilet paper on top of the ground. Animals might eat it, it could easily get into the local water source and contaminate it, and plus it's just gross. Leave No Trace Pack out everything you brought with you! Dispose of your garbage properly off the forest. Leave No Trace is a framework minimum impact practices for anyone visiting the outdoors. They apply to virtually every recreational activity and help increase your safety and enjoyment of the forest. Learn more about the 7 Principles of Leave No Trace. The Mt. Hood National Forest belongs to all Americans- including those who will come long after us. Do your part to keep the forest clean every time you visit.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Dispersed
  10. Camper-submitted photo from Kevin's Mt Hood OG

    10.

    Kevin's Mt Hood OG

    2 Reviews
    12 Photos
    140 Saves
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Dispersed
    • WiFi
    • Alcohol

Popular Camping Styles near Mt. Hood National Forest

Pet-friendly camping near Mt. Hood National Forest

Recent Dispersed Reviews In Mt. Hood National Forest

86 Reviews of 33 Mt. Hood National Forest Campgrounds