Top Glamping near La Pine, OR

Searching for the best camping near La Pine, OR? There are tons of hikes and other fun activities to partake in, as well as sights to see and explore. At The Dyrt, campers like you share their favorite spots, plus tips and photos. No matter where you're headed in La Pine, you'll find the best spot for you and your camping crew.

Best Glamping Sites Near La Pine, OR (26)

    Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground

    1.

    Tumalo State Park Campground

    74 Reviews
    173 Photos
    602 Saves
    Bend, Oregon

    Nestled in the heart of sunny central Oregon, Tumalo rests along Oregon's spectacular Deschutes River. The campground is simultaneously close enough to the town of Bend to make an quick jaunt to the grocery store, but far enough away to escape the commotion. Its location makes it an ideal stepping stone for any type of outdoor activity you could possibly dream of: lush green golf courses, clear blue-ribbon trout steams, pristine alpine lakes, miles upon miles of challenging yet scenic hiking and mountain bike trails, and of course the Cascade Mountains are all within easy reach.

    Campground info:

    Approximately 23 full-hookup sites More than 50 tent campsites Seven yurts (two pet-friendly) Two seasonal group camping area Two seasonal group picnic areas Seasonal hiker/biker camp Showers and flush toilets Firewood and ice sales (in season) Universal Access Four campsites and one yurt are accessible to campers with disabilities.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $21 - $61 / night

  1. 2.

    Thousand Trails Bend-Sunriver

    26 Reviews
    48 Photos
    138 Saves
    Sunriver, Oregon

    Central Oregon is where the east face of the Cascade Range meets the high desert, among a landscape of towering volcanoes, sprawling forests, and vast lava fields. The area is considered an outdoor recreation mecca for its year-round opportunities to stay and play. A good place to begin is the High Desert Museum, which provides information and interpretive displays about the diverse landscape and wildlife found in the area. Nearby attractions include the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Lava River Cave, and Paulina Lake. Central to the area is the town of Bend, which has become notable for its assortment of craft breweries, as well as its flavorful bistros, art galleries, and local arts and crafts shops. A popular summer activity is floating down the Deschutes River, which flows right through the middle of town. The Bend–Sunriver RV Campground is situated alongside the Little Deschutes River, and located approximately 20 miles south of Bend. Visitors have access to more than 300 shady, wooded RV and tent campsites, all equipped with picnic tables and fire rings; many sites are ADA accessible. Back-in RV sites can accommodate vehicles/trailers up to 40 feet. A limited number of sites have electrical hookups, and a dump station is available onsite. The resort also features a selection of cottages, cabins and yurts. Campground amenities include water faucets, restrooms, showers, laundry facilities, Wifi service, a small store and a restaurant. Pets are welcome, and the resort features a dog park. Campsites are $34–$57/night; other accommodations are $84–$169/night; reservations available. There’s plenty to inside the campground as there is outside. Onsite activities include picnic areas, a kids’ playground, game room, sports courts, mini golf, disc golf, and hiking and biking trails. There’s also a large, outdoor pool, spa, and hot tub. Fishing for salmon, whitefish, and rainbow trout can be enjoyed on the river nearby. Outside of the campground, the activity options are practically endless. Summer offers access to 100s of miles of hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding trails in the Deschutes National Forest and Three Sisters Wilderness. There’s also rock climbing at Smith Rock State Park, sunning, swimming, floating, paddling, rafting and fishing on the Deschutes and Metolius Rivers, and bird and wildlife watching in several locations. Winter offers skiing and snowboarding on Mount Bachelor, in addition to cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and more on local trails.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Cascade Meadows RV Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Cascade Meadows RV Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Cascade Meadows RV Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Cascade Meadows RV Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Cascade Meadows RV Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from Cascade Meadows RV Resort

    3.

    Cascade Meadows RV Resort

    7 Reviews
    29 Photos
    37 Saves
    La Pine, Oregon
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake

    4.

    Diamond Lake

    58 Reviews
    148 Photos
    462 Saves
    Diamond Lake, Oregon

    Overview

    Meandering along most of the east shore of the mile-high Diamond Lake, this large campground boasts spectacular views of both Mount Bailey and Mount Thielsen, and offers visitors abundant recreational opportunities.

    Recreation

    At an elevation of 5,183 feet, Diamond Lake provides outdoor enthusiasts with a multitude of recreational opportunities year-round. The area offers a scenic backdrop for swimmers braving its cold, refreshing waters, and anglers casting a lines from boat or shoreline. Rainbow trout thrive in the lake, as it is stocked annually with 300,000 fingerlings. Bicyclists will enjoy riding on the 11-miles of paved trail around the lake, while hikers can head out for the day on one of many trails leaving from the area. Interpretive programs are offered on Saturday evenings at the campground amphitheater.

    Facilities

    At an elevation of 5,183 feet, Diamond Lake provides outdoor enthusiasts with a multitude of recreational opportunities year-round. The area offers a scenic backdrop for swimmers braving its cold, refreshing waters, and anglers casting a lines from boat or shoreline. Rainbow trout thrive in the lake, as it is stocked annually with 300,000 fingerlings. Bicyclists will enjoy riding on the 11-miles of paved trail around the lake, while hikers can head out for the day on one of many trails leaving from the area. Interpretive programs are offered on Saturday evenings at the campground amphitheater.

    Natural Features

    Explosive geologic events have shaped the distinctive landscape on the 984,602-acre Umpqua National Forest, and the area provides spectacular scenery as well as an abundance of natural and cultural resources. The translation of the word, "Umpqua," meaning "thundering waters," defines the area. High mountain lakes, heart-stopping rapids, peaceful ponds and thundering waterfalls, including the 272-foot Watson Falls on the North Umpqua Highway, are available to visitors. Several designated wilderness areas provide opportunities undisturbed solitude. Encompassing 19,100 acres, Boulder Creek Wilderness is an incredible landscape, with dense old growth forests and steep terrain that tower above Boulder Creek. The most popular area in Boulder Creek is Pine Bench. This flat area overlooking Boulder Creek is home to a grove of old growth Ponderosa pines. Diverse ecosystems support a wide range of habitat for wildlife common to the area. From eagles and owls, to salamanders and salmon, these species, along with many others, depend on surrounding undeveloped wilderness, clean streams, and diverse forests to live.

    Nearby Attractions

    Access to Diamond Lake is within walking distance, and boat ramps and fish cleaning stations are accessible to visitors. A nearby resort offers bicycle, boat and horse rentals as well as lodging, restaurants, a grocery store, laundry facilities and fuel. Trails for hiking and mountain biking are within 10 miles of the campground. Visitors may want to take some time to visit nearby Crater Lake National Park, the only national park in Oregon! The amazing Crater Lake area offers a glimpse into the volcanic history of the area. The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), one of the world's premier National Scenic Trails, showcases some of North America's most fantastic scenery, winding its way its way from Mexico to Canada through California, Oregon and Washington, and is accessible near the campground.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $16 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Sunset Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Sunset Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Sunset Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Sunset Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Sunset Cove Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Sunset Cove Campground

    5.

    Sunset Cove Campground

    11 Reviews
    63 Photos
    126 Saves
    Crescent, Oregon

    Overview

    Located next to Odell Lake, Sunset Cove Campground is in the midst of sparkling lakes, tranquil streams and nearby scenic peaks that provide visitors with the perfect backdrop for fishing, boating, hiking and biking throughout the area.

    Recreation

    Odell Lake also offers beautiful campsites tucked away in thick forests and some excellent opportunities for water recreation as boating, fishing and wind surfing are all popular. Boats are the most effective way to fish this lake but be aware of afternoon winds as the lake can get rough. Both motorized and non-motorized boats are allowed on this body of water.

    Facilities

    Odell Lake also offers beautiful campsites tucked away in thick forests and some excellent opportunities for water recreation as boating, fishing and wind surfing are all popular. Boats are the most effective way to fish this lake but be aware of afternoon winds as the lake can get rough. Both motorized and non-motorized boats are allowed on this body of water.

    Natural Features

    This area offers a beautiful mix of Oregon forest types with Douglas fir, white fir, hemlock and a few ponderosa pines towering over a variety of springtime flowers. Huckleberry is common in the underbrush of the campground. Wildlife found in the area include deer, elk, pine martens, ravens, native fish and an occasional black bear. Diamond Peak stands as a sentinel over Odell Lake as one of the blue giants of the Deschutes National Forest and the most prominent peak in the nearby Diamond Peak Wilderness. At an elevation of 8,744 feet, this shield volcano formed as the entire Cascades mountain range was undergoing volcanic activity and uplift.

    Nearby Attractions

    Campers can explore wilderness areas, rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and approximately 1,600 miles of trails that comprise nearly 2.5 million acres within the Deschutes National Forest and the adjacent Ochoco National Forest. Visitors can enjoy traveling the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway, known as Oregon's Highway in the Sky, which climbs into the clouds on a 66-mile drive through the Cascade Range, weaving past snow-capped peaks and alpine lakes. Lava Lands Visitor Center in nearby Bend, Oregon, and the unique geological landscape of Newberry National Volcanic Monument draw visitors to the region as well. It is a great starting point for visitors to learn about the diverse landscape and history of the area through interpretive programs and exhibits. Visitors can also explore the Lava River Cave, located in the Newberry National Volcanic Monument. At 5,211 feet in length, the northwest section of the cave is the longest continuous lava tube in Oregon. A nearby resort on Odell Lake offers lodging and a general store with camping supplies, coffee, snacks and fishing licenses.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Once your reservation start date has begun, neither the Recreation.gov Contact Center nor the campground manager will be able to modify your reservation.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $21 - $23 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins
    Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins
    Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins
    Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins
    Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins
    Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins

    6.

    Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins

    4 Reviews
    14 Photos
    13 Saves
    La Pine, Oregon
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • Tents
    Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed

    7.

    BEND FS 4610 Dispersed

    6 Reviews
    12 Photos
    91 Saves
    Deschutes & Ochoco National Forests & Crooked River National Grassland, Oregon

    Many people enjoy the solitude and primitive experience of camping away from developed campgrounds and other campers. Dispersed camping is the term used for camping anywhere in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Dispersed camping means there are no toilets, no picnic tables, no trash cans, no treated water, and no fire grates. If you are dispersed camping in the winter, recognize that the Forest Service does not plow or maintain Forest Roads in the winter, so plan your trip accordingly.

    Typically, dispersed camping is NOT allowed in the vicinity of developed recreation areas such as campgrounds, boat ramps, picnic areas or trailheads. There are extra responsibilities and skills that are necessary for dispersed camping. It's your responsibility to know these before you try this new experience.

    Picking a Campsite If you are going to an area where others have camped before, pick a site that's been used before. Plants, soil and wildlife are impacted by new campsites, so using existing ones will minimize your impact on the forest. If there is no existing campsite, then follow these Leave No Trace guidelines:

    Camp on bare soil if possible, to avoid damaging or killing plants and grass. Do NOT camp within 200 feet of any water source, plants near water are especially fragile. Don't camp in the middle of a clearing or meadow. Make your campsite less visible so that other visitors will see a "wild" setting. Don't try to level or dig trenches in the ground at your campsite. Select a campsite with good natural drainage. Visit the Leave No Trace website for more information.

    Campfires Campfires are allowed when you are dispersed camping UNLESS there are fire restrictions in effect due to high fire danger conditions. It is YOUR responsibility to know if fire restrictions are in effect before you go camping.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • RVs
    Camper-submitted photo from Crescent Lake Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Crescent Lake Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Crescent Lake Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Crescent Lake Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Crescent Lake Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Crescent Lake Campground

    8.

    Crescent Lake Campground

    7 Reviews
    12 Photos
    92 Saves
    Crescent, Oregon

    Overview

    Crescent Lake Campground is located on a hill overlooking beautiful Crescent Lake in Deschutes National Forest. It offers visitors the opportunity to experience the beauty and recreational opportunities of the eastern Cascade Range. Crescent Lake is the first campground in the Deschutes National Forest to offer yurts in a scenic location, great for individuals and groups alike.

    Recreation

    Crescent Lake is a prime location for boating, fishing and swimming. The Summit Lake Trail is popular among hikers and mountain bikers, offering excellent views of Diamond Peak across Crescent Lake. A boat ramp is located on-site. Visitors can take advantage of skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling in the winter months. Crescent Lake Snowpark offers a base camp for exciting winter excursions. The Summit Lake Trail is open to snowmobiling.

    Facilities

    Crescent Lake is a prime location for boating, fishing and swimming. The Summit Lake Trail is popular among hikers and mountain bikers, offering excellent views of Diamond Peak across Crescent Lake. A boat ramp is located on-site. Visitors can take advantage of skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling in the winter months. Crescent Lake Snowpark offers a base camp for exciting winter excursions. The Summit Lake Trail is open to snowmobiling.

    Natural Features

    Cresent Lake is nestled in a glacier basin east of the towering Cascade Mountain Range. It boasts brilliant blue-green water and sandy beaches. A forest of lodgepole pine provides the backdrop to this area, with mountain hemlock, fir and spruce also in the mix. Wildlife found in the area includes deer, native fish and migratory birds.

    Nearby Attractions

    Visitors can explore wilderness areas, rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and approximately 1,600 miles of trails that comprise nearly 2.5 million acres within the Deschutes National Forest and the adjacent Ochoco National Forest. Lava Lands Visitor Center in nearby Bend, Oregon, and the unique geological landscape of Newberry National Volcanic Monument draw visitors to the region as well. Visitors enjoy traveling the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway, known as Oregon's Highway in the Sky, which climbs into the clouds on a 66-mile drive through the Cascade Range, weaving past snow-capped peaks and alpine lakes.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Once your reservation start date has begun, neither the Recreation.gov Contact Center nor the campground manager will be able to modify your reservation.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $25 - $27 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from East Lake Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from East Lake Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from East Lake Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from East Lake Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from East Lake Resort
    Camper-submitted photo from East Lake Resort

    9.

    East Lake Resort

    3 Reviews
    25 Photos
    15 Saves
    La Pine, Oregon

    Lodge located on the shores of East Lake.

    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Cabins
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    • Tent Cabin
    • Glamping
    Camper-submitted photo from Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River
    Camper-submitted photo from Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River
    Camper-submitted photo from Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River
    Camper-submitted photo from Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River
    Camper-submitted photo from Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River
    Camper-submitted photo from Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River

    10.

    Wyeth Campground at the Deschutes River

    2 Reviews
    18 Photos
    20 Saves
    La Pine, Oregon

    Overview

    Wyeth Campground is a small campground located along the Deschutes River just downstream from Wickiup Reservoir. Please note that there are two US Forest Service campgrounds named "Wyeth" in Oregon. This one is on the Deschutes National Forest along the Deschutes River. The other is located within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Please make sure that you choose the one you intend to stay in.

    Recreation

    Paddling and fishing are popular activities in this area. Motorized boating is not permitted on this stretch of the Deschutes River.

    Facilities

    Paddling and fishing are popular activities in this area. Motorized boating is not permitted on this stretch of the Deschutes River.

    Natural Features

    The Deschutes River flows north through mixed conifer forest.

    Nearby Attractions

    Visitors can explore wilderness areas, rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and approximately hundred of miles of trail. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, approxiately 45 minutes by vehicle, is a great starting point for visitors to learn about the diverse landscape and history of the area through interpretive programs and exhibits. Visitors can explore Lava River Cave, the longest continuous lava tube in Oregon. Visitors enjoy traveling the Cascade Lakes Scenic Bywaywhich climbs 66 miles through the Cascade Range, weaving past snow-capped peaks and alpine lakes.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Once your reservation start date has begun, neither the Recreation.gov Contact Center nor the campground manager will be able to modify your reservation.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $11 - $19 / night

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Frequently Asked Questions

Which is the most popular glamping campsite near La Pine, OR?

According to TheDyrt.com, the most popular glamping campground near La Pine, OR is Tumalo State Park Campground with a 4.4-star rating from 74 reviews.

What is the best site to find glamping camping near La Pine, OR?

TheDyrt.com has all 26 glamping camping locations near La Pine, OR, with real photos and reviews from campers.