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Top Yurt Camping near Bend, OR

198 Reviews

Looking for a place to yurt camp near Bend? The Dyrt lets you enjoy a unique, rustic Bend experience in a yurt. Search nearby yurts or find top-rated spots from other campers.

Best Yurt Camping Sites Near Bend, OR (15)

  1. Camper-submitted photo from Tumalo State Park Campground

    1.

    Tumalo State Park Campground

    72 Reviews
    173 Photos
    570 Saves
    Bend, Oregon

    Nestled in the heart of sunny central Oregon, Tumalo rests along Oregon's spectacular Deschutes River. The campground is simultaneously close enough to the town of Bend to make an quick jaunt to the grocery store, but far enough away to escape the commotion. Its location makes it an ideal stepping stone for any type of outdoor activity you could possibly dream of: lush green golf courses, clear blue-ribbon trout steams, pristine alpine lakes, miles upon miles of challenging yet scenic hiking and mountain bike trails, and of course the Cascade Mountains are all within easy reach.

    Campground info:

    Approximately 23 full-hookup sites More than 50 tent campsites Seven yurts (two pet-friendly) Two seasonal group camping area Two seasonal group picnic areas Seasonal hiker/biker camp Showers and flush toilets Firewood and ice sales (in season) Universal Access Four campsites and one yurt are accessible to campers with disabilities.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $21 - $61 / night

  2. 2.

    Thousand Trails Bend-Sunriver

    25 Reviews
    43 Photos
    128 Saves
    Sunriver, Oregon

    Central Oregon is where the east face of the Cascade Range meets the high desert, among a landscape of towering volcanoes, sprawling forests, and vast lava fields. The area is considered an outdoor recreation mecca for its year-round opportunities to stay and play. A good place to begin is the High Desert Museum, which provides information and interpretive displays about the diverse landscape and wildlife found in the area. Nearby attractions include the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Lava River Cave, and Paulina Lake. Central to the area is the town of Bend, which has become notable for its assortment of craft breweries, as well as its flavorful bistros, art galleries, and local arts and crafts shops. A popular summer activity is floating down the Deschutes River, which flows right through the middle of town. The Bend–Sunriver RV Campground is situated alongside the Little Deschutes River, and located approximately 20 miles south of Bend. Visitors have access to more than 300 shady, wooded RV and tent campsites, all equipped with picnic tables and fire rings; many sites are ADA accessible. Back-in RV sites can accommodate vehicles/trailers up to 40 feet. A limited number of sites have electrical hookups, and a dump station is available onsite. The resort also features a selection of cottages, cabins and yurts. Campground amenities include water faucets, restrooms, showers, laundry facilities, Wifi service, a small store and a restaurant. Pets are welcome, and the resort features a dog park. Campsites are $34–$57/night; other accommodations are $84–$169/night; reservations available. There’s plenty to inside the campground as there is outside. Onsite activities include picnic areas, a kids’ playground, game room, sports courts, mini golf, disc golf, and hiking and biking trails. There’s also a large, outdoor pool, spa, and hot tub. Fishing for salmon, whitefish, and rainbow trout can be enjoyed on the river nearby. Outside of the campground, the activity options are practically endless. Summer offers access to 100s of miles of hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding trails in the Deschutes National Forest and Three Sisters Wilderness. There’s also rock climbing at Smith Rock State Park, sunning, swimming, floating, paddling, rafting and fishing on the Deschutes and Metolius Rivers, and bird and wildlife watching in several locations. Winter offers skiing and snowboarding on Mount Bachelor, in addition to cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and more on local trails.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  3. Camper-submitted photo from Prineville Reservoir Campground — Prineville Reservoir State Park

    3.

    Prineville Reservoir Campground — Prineville Reservoir State Park

    25 Reviews
    56 Photos
    119 Saves
    Prineville, Oregon

    Located partway along the Crooked River’s 125-mile journey from the Ochoco Mountains to its confluence with the Deschutes River, the Prineville Reservoir is a vast blue pool filling a colorful canyon of volcanic rock, sagebrush and juniper. The reservoir was created in the 1960s with the construction of the Bowman Dam. The state park was established shortly after to provide campers, anglers and water lovers an opportunity to enjoy the natural area—and a chance to beat Central Oregon’s summer heat. The park lies adjacent to the Prineville Reservoir Wildlife Area, which preserves the habitat of a wide variety of mammals, waterfowl, songbirds and raptors.

    Prineville Reservoir State Park is located just 15 miles south of the town of Prineville, and 50 miles east of Bend. The park’s Main Campground features 67 sites, including full- and partial-hookup RV sites and primitive tent sites. The Jasper Point Campground features 28 partial-hookup sites. Both locations provide drinking water, flush and vault toilets, hot showers, and recycling stations; a dump station is located at the Jasper Point site. There are also a few camping cabins for rent. The park hosts interpretive programs at an outdoor amphitheater, and onsite amenities include sports courts, hiking trails, a dog park, and a fishing pier. The park host sells ice and firewood. Dogs are welcome, but must remain leashed. Seasonal campsites are $21–$33/night; cabins are $89–$99/night; reservations recommended.

    For enjoying some on-the-water fun time, boaters can launch watercraft from the ramp at the day-use area, which has plenty of parking for vehicles and trailers. Nearby, sunbathers and swimmers can enjoy some beach time at the designated swim area. Picnic tables are available for packing lunches and refreshments to enjoy by the water. For paddling around the shoreline, kayaks and SUPs can be put in from either the boat launch or the beach. Anglers can cast for trout, catfish, bass and black crappie, then take their catches back and prep them for dinner at the park’s fish cleaning station. Another boat ramp, beach and parking area is located west of the state park at Powder House Cove, near the Bowman Dam.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $37 / night

  4. Camper-submitted photo from Deschutes River Campground — The Cove Palisades State Park
  5. Camper-submitted photo from Redmond - Central Oregon KOA

    5.

    Redmond - Central Oregon KOA

    15 Reviews
    24 Photos
    26 Saves
    Culver, Oregon
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  6. Camper-submitted photo from South Shore Suttle Lake

    6.

    South Shore Suttle Lake

    11 Reviews
    36 Photos
    144 Saves
    Camp Sherman, Oregon

    Overview

    South Shore Campground is located along Suttle Lake, shaded by Douglas fir and Ponderosa pine. One section of the camp sits on the shoreline, while the other is nestled on a hillside. Most sites have lake views. The 3,400-foot elevation and the lake breezes make South Shore Campground a comfortable summertime destination.

    Recreation

    There is a boat launch available at this camp. Popular activities include power and non-motorized boating, sailing, water skiing and wind surfing. Anglers can fish for rainbow trout, kokanee salmon and brown trout, and there is a fish cleaning station on-site. Hikers and mountain bikers have access to the 3.2-mile Suttle Lake Shoreline Trail.

    Facilities

    Each site has a gravel parking spur, picnic table and campfire ring. Dump stations are dispersed through the campground. Drinking water and vault toilets are provided.

    Natural Features

    Nestled along the Cascade Mountains, the Deschutes National Forest is one of the most popular recreation forests in the Pacific Northwest. It offers a variety of landscapes, from fields of sagebrush and hay to old-growth forests and glacier-carved volcanic peaks. Suttle Lake is a natural lake formed by glaciers. It has a forested shoreline and offers views of nearby Mt. Washington.

    Nearby Attractions

    The town of Sisters is about 15 miles away, offering shopping and restaurants.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Once your reservation start date has begun, neither the Recreation.gov Contact Center nor the campground manager will be able to modify your reservation.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $26 - $28 / night

  7. Camper-submitted photo from Devils Lake Campground - Deschutes National Forest

    7.

    Devils Lake Campground - Deschutes National Forest

    5 Reviews
    9 Photos
    78 Saves
    Deschutes National Forest, Oregon

    Devils Lake Campground campground offers ten hike-in, tent-only sites. Site parking is at the South Sisters/Devils Lake Trailhead. Camping is allowed only in designated campsites. Only foot or horse traffic is permitted on trails in this area. This campground is a gateway to the Three Sisters Wilderness and one of the most popular routes to hike South Sister. Recreation Fee Site: Parking at this site requires a recreation pass May 1 – September 30. Passes are available at this site, but can also be purchased from Forest Service offices or vendors. Please check here for more information about recreation passes and where they can be purchased. Acceptable passes include: $5 Day Pass Northwest Forest Pass Interagency Annual Pass Interagency Senior Pass (America the Beautiful, Golden Age) Interagency Access Pass Interagency Military Pass Every Kid in a Park Pass Northwest Forest ePass

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $10 - $62 / night

  8. Camper-submitted photo from BEND FS 4610 Dispersed

    8.

    BEND FS 4610 Dispersed

    1 Review
    38 Saves
    Deschutes & Ochoco National Forests & Crooked River National Grassland, Oregon

    Many people enjoy the solitude and primitive experience of camping away from developed campgrounds and other campers. Dispersed camping is the term used for camping anywhere in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Dispersed camping means there are no toilets, no picnic tables, no trash cans, no treated water, and no fire grates. If you are dispersed camping in the winter, recognize that the Forest Service does not plow or maintain Forest Roads in the winter, so plan your trip accordingly.

    Typically, dispersed camping is NOT allowed in the vicinity of developed recreation areas such as campgrounds, boat ramps, picnic areas or trailheads. There are extra responsibilities and skills that are necessary for dispersed camping. It's your responsibility to know these before you try this new experience.

    Picking a Campsite If you are going to an area where others have camped before, pick a site that's been used before. Plants, soil and wildlife are impacted by new campsites, so using existing ones will minimize your impact on the forest. If there is no existing campsite, then follow these Leave No Trace guidelines:

    Camp on bare soil if possible, to avoid damaging or killing plants and grass. Do NOT camp within 200 feet of any water source, plants near water are especially fragile. Don't camp in the middle of a clearing or meadow. Make your campsite less visible so that other visitors will see a "wild" setting. Don't try to level or dig trenches in the ground at your campsite. Select a campsite with good natural drainage. Visit the Leave No Trace website for more information.

    Campfires Campfires are allowed when you are dispersed camping UNLESS there are fire restrictions in effect due to high fire danger conditions. It is YOUR responsibility to know if fire restrictions are in effect before you go camping.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • RVs
  9. Camper-submitted photo from Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins

    9.

    Paulina Lake Lodge Cabins

    4 Reviews
    14 Photos
    11 Saves
    La Pine, Oregon
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • Tents
  10. Camper-submitted photo from Olallie Campground

    10.

    Olallie Campground

    7 Reviews
    15 Photos
    87 Saves
    Mckenzie Bridge, Oregon

    Overview

    Nestled on the banks of the McKenzie River and Olallie Creek, Olallie Campground provides a superb setting for a getaway into nature. The lower loop offers mesmerizing views of both the river and the creek while the upper loop is set further in the trees with many sites facing the creek. The McKenzie River is a tributary of the Willamette River that runs for 90 miles, flowing into the southernmost end of the Willamette Valley. There are 16 campsites, for which 15 are reservable.__ Sites can accommodate vehicles and trailers up to 35 feet in length.__ There are 4 sites that have short parking spurs, on uneven slopes, and are recommended as tent sites only/not suitable for RV parking.__ Drinking water is available via one hand pump well which is located on the lower loop.__ There are two accessible double vault toilet buildings; one on the upper road and one on the lower.__ Trash receptacles are located in the campground. Reservations may be made up to 6 months in advance of arrival date by reserving online at RECREATION.GOV or by calling 877-444-6777.

    Recreation

    Fishing, rafting and swimming are three top activities in the river. A day use picnic area is also available at the campground. Nearby is the 26 mile McKenzie River National Recreation Trail, which provides access to world class mountain biking and hiking.

    Facilities

    This campground has 16 sites divided into two loops along the eastern banks of the river by Olallie Creek. No electric hookups are available at the campground. Picnic tables, vault toilets and drinking water are among the amenities available. A camp host is on-site, and firewood is available for purchase.

    Natural Features

    Olallie Campground is located in the midsection of the Cascades mountain range in western Oregon. The Willamette National Forest stretches for 110 miles with varied landscapes of high mountains, narrow canyons, cascading streams, and wooded slopes.

    contact_info

    For facility specific information, please call (541) 967-3917.

    Nearby Attractions

    McKenzie Pass-Santiam Pass National Scenic Byway, McKenzie River National Recreation Trail (hiking and mountain biking destination), and McKenzie Wild and Scenic River for boating and fishing. Fishing, rafting and swimming are three top activities in the river. A day use picnic area is also available at the campground.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Cabins

    $36 / night

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Pet-friendly camping near Bend

Recent Yurt Reviews In Bend

198 Reviews of 15 Bend Campgrounds