Tent Cabin
Group
Tent Sites
Fires Allowed
Pets Unknown
Drinking Water
About Chickasaw National Recreation Area Cold Springs Campground
Access
Drive In
Features
Drinking Water
Fires Allowed
Phone Service
Picnic Table
Showers
Toilets
Trash Available
Location
Chickasaw National Recreation Area Cold Springs Campground is located in Oklahoma
Latitude
34.5009 N
Longitude
-96.9603 W
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2 Reviews of Chickasaw National Recreation Area Cold Springs Campground
Nice campground with many things to do for the kids

Have camped here a couple of times with family and alone. We typically prefer to have a camp site at the back so that we aren't completely surrounded by other campsites.

Sites in this area are closer together than sites in other campgrounds in the area.

Sites are large and flat with fire rings, picnic tables, and lantern hooks. 

Camped one night here the first week of May 2019, and was the only camper in this camp ground. It was great with a little abandoned feel to it. The camp host was a little grumpy, and the season had just started.

Things to do:

Visit the Nature Center

Hike the spring trails

Multiple swimming area along the road to the nature center

Little Niagara

See the bisons

Hike the top of Bromide lookout

Bromide Springs

swim and fish at Lake of the Arbuckles

Etc…

First to Review
RANGER REVIEW: VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG at Cold Springs Campground

Check Out The Campground: CLICK HERE

VIVO BareFoot: CLICK HERE

My Full Video Review Of The The VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG: CLICK HERE

Campground Review

Pulling into the Chickasaw National Recreation Area several camping options jump out just begging for you to choose them. I selected the Cold Springs Campground on this trip because its great location and access to the many falls of the area.

Along this turn out you can find many of the most popular stops for cool waters, hiking and natural beauty including most arguably the best stop to take a cool dip on a hot day, Little Niagara, a spring fed waterfall system which traverses some 2 mies downstream. With this being one of the first campgrounds in the area you are also just moments from the Chickasaw Cultural Center, a location which hosts many Native American educational events, stomp dance exhibitions and festivals for the community of Sulphur.

The campground has been partially modernized in comparison to other camps around the state, with a digital kiosk pay station as you enter camp, you can come any time, find a site and easily pay using any payment method. By far this surpasses the traditional honor box system which sometimes can be a bit tricky when you don’t bring exact change.

I found that campsites were large and welcoming when pulling into this camp. Big enough for RVs but ideal for tents, a variety of campers could call this space home with 65 campsites. In addition to this being the perfect site for individual campers, a group camp is located just a few hundred yards away for those needing a bit more.

The site I selected was right inside the opening loop, close to the restrooms, shaded in the rear from the road and with a large flat pad for my tent. The pad was constructed from small gravel and took little to no time to clear from fallen debris.

While the sites are dry camping, there are water spigots scattered throughout camp. Sites are equipped with a picnic table, fire ring with grill and lantern post, pretty typical of any government site, however these did look to be much more well maintained than others I have visited in the area. Restrooms at this site were well maintained and had nice flush toilets.

The only downside I found to the particular site I selected was its proximity to the gate itself and the influx of in and out traffic. Typically I would select something a bit further into the campground for privacy, but this site was so welcoming I went against my gut and with it. But for only $14 you could not beat the feeling this place offered with the woods engulfing your site and in the evening the deer roaming around ever so cautiously.

A few things to remember about this campsite:

  • Seasonally open from May through September.
  • Pets are welcome here but do require a leash at all times.

Rating:

I would give the Cold Spring Camp a 4 of 5 for its proximity, overall spaciousness and amenities. This site was only a short 5 minute drive from the Nature Center, had access to many hiking trails in the area and was secluded from the major highway just enough to make it feel much further away from town than it actually was.

Product Review

  • Name: VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG
  • Retail Price: $150.00
  • Size: 7.5
  • Color: Olive

As a Ranger for the Dyrt, I am sent items to test from time to time to give real feed back about how these items work within my active lifestyle. On this trip I was closing out my review cycle for the VIVO Barefoot Primus Trail SG shoes. These shoes are a part of the vast line of minimalist shoes VIVO Barefoot has released utilizing recycled bottles and other materials to keep in line with a Vegan outlook. The shoes are the “soft ground” version of their outdoor line, designed to grip comfortably the ground below you and provide both support and traction when running, hiking or simply walking.

Shipping:

I placed my order for these shoes and within 5 days they arrived at my home. Shipping for the package arrived in a VIVO red reinforced bag with bold branding on the outside. Inside the box was a hefty box containing materials about the shoe, shipping receipt, 1 pair of shoe laces, 2 insoles and the shoes neatly wrapped in branded tissue paper.

Field Testing:

I tested these shoes over 5 different wears over two weeks of doing typical things I do in my day to day life. With my stop at Cold Springs I put them to the final test, navigating on slippery rocks as I traversed the many waterfalls in the area, trekking through boggy wet grounds as I visited the neighboring Fall Festival at the Chickasaw Cultural Center, climbing on steep gravel banks and walking on various types of surface. I can only say that the shoes never seemed to miss a beat or make me feel the slightest bit uneasy in my footing.

For someone like myself, finding a shoe which suits my lifestyle is multi-fold. I have had issues with chronic sciatica over the years which has nearly grounded me from travel multiple times, my joints tend to build pressure and pop often and over time and though playing sports as a child I just wasn’t the most friendly to my body as I could be. I had seen information about minimalist shoes helping retrain your step and get your body more in line with its natural feel by extending the muscles you typically are shrinking wearing highly padded shoes, by allowing your toes to rest more naturally and less hindered while in the shoes and by allowing your joints to naturally cushion your walk. I didn’t know what exactly to expect from the shoes and was not expecting a miracle, but I was curious I will say.

Over the first 4 wears I noticed that taking the shoes off I did not experience the same pain after long days that I typically would in a standard pair of running shoes. Pain is perhaps a strong word, discomfort would be more appropriate. Instead I simply felt like I had removed the shoes. I know that sounds strange but considering I didn’t even know I had an issue it was a strange feeling indeed when I had the ah ha moment. Not only that I noticed following removal, typically I stand and stretch and hear my joint popping, however with the VIVO Barefoot shoes I didn’t have the tension release.

With these I can walk around feeling the ground below me in a comfortable way. On stones and uneven surfaces I feel like I can grip better with my feet to secure my balance and though they are taking a little adjustment I am really enjoying the overall feel of the shoes.

Pros:

  • Water resistant - When I was walking on the rocks and around the waters edge at Cold Springs, I noticed that while I could feel the water, I didn’t feel like it was sloshing inside my shoes. They are water resistant, and while that does not mean I could fully submerge my foot I felt with the hiking around the rocks I was safe.
  • Flexible - When you get this shoe you are inclined to test the shoes flexibility considering it is made from recycled plastic bottles, something I feel is much more rigid by nature than what I feel my shoe should be. They completely roll up end to end! Any shoe that will do that is a shoe I know will move and grip in any direction I am moving for sure.
  • Tight Ankle - It was great for keeping debris out of my shoe and assisted in my shoe not slipping on my foot when I was wearing it throughout the day or competing with my sock.

Cons:

  • Tight Ankle - It was very difficult to get onto my foot because it was not stretchy enough to easily slip on. Over time I know it will loosen a bit, but that by far is the worst thing about the shoe in my opinion.
  • With or without insoles - Inside the box an insert insole is provided, to get the full barefoot experience you can opt to not use these or you can use them for a bit of cushion. I was a bit conflicted by the choice. Without the insoles the shoe slips on much easier but it also is a bit more of a rough ride feel when getting used to them.

Rating:

Of 5 stars I would give the VIVO Barefoot Primus 4 stars. I love the shoes but the process of putting them on being so difficult (almost 10 minutes the first time I put them on). I feel like it will continue to take some warming up to them to really know how I like that aspect. I have found that when using them to workout that tight ankle does make a small red impression on the top of my foot and while my feet themselves do not hurt, in the long run I would not want the to be the continued outcome. I will continue wearing them and testing them and I assume this will pass.