Standard (tent/RV)
Cabins
Dispersed
RV Sites
Tent Sites
Fires Allowed
Pets Allowed
Drinking Water
About Mammoth Campground

The only campground in the park open year-round, Mammoth Campground—elevation 6,200 feet (1890 m)—is located five miles south of Gardiner, Montana and the park's North Entrance. Situated in a high sagebrush steppe, scattered juniper and Douglas fir trees provide shade during hot summer months. The campground is close to fishing, hiking, and the Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces. Great wildlife viewing opportunities abound with elk and bison occasionally passing through the campground.

ADA Access: Five accessible campsites, accessible routes along paved roadway, ramp to amphitheater. The North Entrance Wash Tub in Gardiner, Montana has public showers, including an accessible shower and bathroom. They have a ramp that enters at the side of the building. This would be the closest accessible shower facility to the Mammoth Campground.

Price
$5.00 - $20.00
Operator
National Park Service
Access
Drive In
Walk In
Hike In
Features
ADA Accessible
Alcohol Allowed
Drinking Water
Fires Allowed
Firewood Available
Pets Allowed
Phone Service
Picnic Table
Toilets
Trash Available
Water Hookups
Location
Mammoth Campground is located in Wyoming
Latitude
44.9736 N
Longitude
-110.6932 W
Get Directions
Directions
Located at Mammoth Hot Springs, five miles south of the North Entrance.
46 Reviews of Mammoth Campground
A Jumping Off Point

Situated just below Mammoth, this campground is frequently visited by a myriad of wildlife. Elk, bison, and a fox we're our neighbors while we visited. In the off season, this campground is quiet, though the only restroom open is the one nearest the pay station (behind it - beside the main road). A perfect place to stay before (or after) spending a day in the park.

A Jumping Off Point

Situated just below Mammoth, this campground is frequently visited by a myriad of wildlife. Elk, bison, and a fox we're our neighbors while we visited. In the off season, this campground is quiet, though the only restroom open is the one nearest the pay station (behind it - beside the main road). A perfect place to stay before (or after) spending a day in the park.

A Jumping Off Point

Situated just below Mammoth, this campground is frequently visited by a myriad of wildlife. Elk, bison, and a fox we're our neighbors while we visited. In the off season, this campground is quiet, though the only restroom open is the one nearest the pay station (behind it - beside the main road). A perfect place to stay before (or after) spending a day in the park.

new scenery

Campsites were close to a high way and far away from the rest of the park. A nice stop for a change of scenery, but not the best scenery around. The campground hosts were awesome! And so was a wolf ranger talk we went to!

Chilly Camping

This campground is the only one in the park that stays open year round which makes it a wonderful place to go in the winter if you are up for some cold nights. They keep one bathroom right near the entrance open and the thing is heated so it is actually quite nice. You can also have the place almost completely to yourself making for a very peaceful getaway in a place that is normally crawling with tourists. Overall, it is one of my favorite places to stay in the winter.

Year-Round Campground in Yellowstone

Mammoth Hot Springs campground is the only (year-round) campground open in Yellowstone from late fall to spring. This campground has about 85 sites, and half of those are open in the winter. Summer time makes this campground feel quite crowded, and allows for RVs up to 75 feet, but in winter there is a tight turn that makes it only open to RVs under 30 feet. The campground is set in tiers on a hillside, so if you get a site near the top, you have an excellent view of the surrounding valley and Electric Peak.

This campground has drinking water available but no dump station. We usually haul to Billings and dump at Cabela's there, or stop at Canyon campground if heading out the East Entrance. In the off-season this campground is a very nice stay - quiet even though it is close to the road, and not usually full until spring. The town of Gardiner, MT, is only a few miles north, which offers restaurants and gas (although there is also both available in Mammoth Hot Springs). Just up the hill above the campground is the town of M. H. Springs, which is a nice place to spend time. If you are traveling with kids, be sure to stop in the awesome Visitor Center and museum. Lots of hands-on stuff to explore. Just up from the Visitor Center are the Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces, a geological feature sure to knock your socks off in any season.

For the more adventurous souls like us, you can access the Boiling River Trail to the north of the campground and jump in the river, even in the middle of winter. The Boiling River flows into the Gardner River, creating the perfect all-season hot tub. In addition to thermal features, there are tons of wildlife viewing opportunities right from the campground, especially elk, bison, and bighorn sheep.

Although not our favorite campground in the park, MHS Campground, being open all year, is an ample location to stay on your Yellowstone vacation.

Touristy Yellowstone but this campsite gets the job done!

Yellowstone is one of the more frequented parks. You will see a ton of RV's and about 1,000 people to every bison it seems like. That said, Mammoth is a great location for your first nights stay if coming in through the parks North Entrance, as we did. Grabbing a site so close to the entrance made it possible to take our time in that region of the park for a day until moving on to the next. The hot springs are very interesting. There is a wooden boardwalk for viewing them. The campground itself has a lot of sites (over 80 if I recall correctly) and the fee is $20 per night. We discovered it is open year round which would be great for winter camping in the area. You cannot reserve sites here so you will need to get in early. It was only about half full when we were there in August which really surprised us.

Enjoy Yellowstone without the crowds!

Its not that I hate crowds…I just want to avoid them when I'm camping, when I can.

To choose Yellowstone and Mammoth Hot Springs, in particular, is foolhardy to think you can avoid crowds…unless…you go in the dead of winter. Which is what we decided to do. That…and we had heard that wildlife was prolific in and around that area, driven from the higher elevations in search for food.

As luck would have it, Mammoth Hot Springs is the only campground open all year in Yellowstone.

Now, remember…it is the west…you are still above 6,000 ft. and it is winter. Plan accordingly. I would have given this wintery haven five stars…but I was longing for a hot shower several days into our trip…nope, nada, forget about it. Although, they did have flush toilets, sinks and hand dryers (indispensible if nothing else would thaw you out).

The trip there was uneventful and roads were fairly clean of snow. However, there are signs everywhere that studded tires or chains were the law. Ugh, ooops! Didn't have either…and as fate would have it…we paid the price on the way out in heavy snowfall. But that should not detract from the campground or the park.

Not so surpisingly, we enjoyed the entire campground to ourselves in the first of March. A deep blanket of snow had covered everything…so we located a picnic table…and stomped down the snow in the outline of our tent…laid out the ground tarp and set up our tent (who knows if we set up in the right location).

We did visit the hot springs, the geyser was spewing forth from the earth like clockwork, even in the winter. It was enjoyable…but we came to skinny ski our way around the area.

Our first night was exciting, as we were met with the howls, yips and snarls of a pack of coyotes. Through the thin walls of the tent, it sounded as if they were circling the tent.

There were other X-country skiers and we actually did a loop with the ranger, a planned interpretive ski excursion. We joined them for a while and then broke off to explore some of the higher elevation ski loops.

It was eerily quiet, other than the sounds of the wind through the conifers. It should be noted that it is vitally important not to startle or get too close to any of the animals, especially at this time of year. These animals are trying to conserve energy, with lack of foods…and if startled, they could burn what little reserves they have.

We were treated with numerous wildlife sitings. My camera was not the best, so they don't capture but a portion of what we saw. Most of the trails we had to blaze new track from the heavy snowfall, but we were prepared. Make sure you bring plenty of water. Most people don't hydrate enough during winter activities…and you actually need more water.

We were privileged to ski beside giant bison, heads swaying back and forth, clearing the snow to forage what grass they could find…Big Horn sheep, elk and coyotes.

One morning we rose to footsteps beside our tent…believing it was those pesky coyotes…when I unzipped the tent door…in came a cow elk's muzzle. Yes, we will just say it caught me off guard. They tolerated our presence and hung out with us.

Beautiful views at every turn…and solitude…no crowds. Consider a winter Mammoth Hot Springs trip for yourself…you'll be glad you did! And bring your studded tires or tire chains.

Always open...

This campground is always open, but how busy it is always seems to change with the season.

Right by the north entrance and Mammoth Hot Springs (which is awesome) and you'll almost always see some elk, but not as close to other "main" attractions so people will pass it by. Sites are a bit open, so you're not as secluded as some of the other campgrounds in the park, but they make up for that by being bigger than the other sites (which unfortunately can attract some pretty large RVs).
Because you don't have the shading of the forest like other sites it can get pretty warm. You have picnic table and fire ring with potable water and running water facilities.

In all her glory

Yellowstone has always been one of my favorite places on earth, but when you gather with all of your extended family to celebrate the life of a member who served in the park for many years, this location brought perfection for all.