The best HIKE IN camping near
Alamillo , NEW MEXICO

10 Reviews5 Campgrounds

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Most Recent Alamillo Camping Reviews
Cozy campground

I decided to stay here last minute and arrived after dark on Jan. 21st. It was easy to find- look for the drive just to the side of the canal (I turned left onto the dirt road after coming off I-25). There are 2 dirt roads - take the upper one to the right, and within a few hundred feet there is a steepish driveway to the right down to under the trees.

Tables and fire rings provided- although as another reviewer stated, there are posted fire restrictions.

Sites are very flat. There is a semi-busy road nearby but it feels secluded under the trees. One other camper set up when I got in- I was surprised to see anyone, but it was nice to know someone else was around too.

I’d definitely stay here again, even as a solo female traveler.

Lots of cell service (ATT)

Simple

Nice spot in the cottonwoods room for about 10 with good space in between. Concrete tables with fire pits although there's restrictions right now. It is right off the road and a little steep to get into.

Hoodoos and beasties

Rather hard to find the road onto the correct road to get to the right road! Once headed to the west look for the sign taking you to the right into a dry wash. Follow the arroyo past a giant "bread loaf" that is a geological unconformity. Drive into an abrupt canyon with straight walls and side slots. Eventually you run into a rock wall that can be traversed by scrambling around it and continue 1/2 mile to a short pour-off. Camping is allowed but be aware of flash floods. It's a narrow canyon with only one way out. A parallel road just to the south of San Lorenzo Canyon is all on BLM land (dispersed camping). Pack it in, pack it out.

Best free campsite I have ever been to!

We just arrived at this free campground. Concrete picnic tables and fire rings provided. We are surrounded by what looks to me like oak trees, but I have yet to confirm that. It reminds me of my home state of Minnesota!

We are near the Rio Grande Bosque, and are looking forward to our ventures observing the migratory birds of the area.

Rough Tent Camping...Great Rock Climbing

Drove down the night before in order to go climbing the next day.  Found a decent spot in a dry wash to put up the tent for the night.  It worked and allowed quick access to the crag in the morning.  Does start to get busy with climbers fairly early (8am or so).  Would be perfect for somebody with a camper-van or teardrop.

Pretty cool area

Cool place. The spots with fire pits have been blocked off by private property signs. Camping definitely at your own risk, perfect for just a day trip.

Great little spot

We stopped here after the Hot Air Ballon Fiesta. Didn’t think we’d find anything but glad we were wring lovely colors here with fall!

One of my favorite hidden back-country gems

One of my favorite hidden gems! There are no frills here…just 4 camp sites and a pit toilet in an isolated setting. No water. Pack in-pack out. The drive up to the camp ground is rough and narrow with some hair-pin turns (and spectacular views!), but it is passable (we have an old Honda CRV AWD and pull a small trailer)…just don't plan on getting there fast. I would not recommend trying the road with an RV. The camp sites are spacious, mostly flat, and provide a lovely view of the mountainside. At about 8500 ft MSL elevation, it is cool up there! August nights are very comfortable; by September, the nights are chilly. There are plenty of hiking trails and old forest-service roads to explore and even a near-by geocache (if you do that).

Climbing area where you can camp if you are chill

10-15 down 60 west of Socorro you'll find "the box" climbing area. This is on BLM land, and there is no trash pick-up or other managed facilities here, so camping is at your own discretion and you MUST leave the area as you found it (or better). There is a vault toilet at the main parking lot as you drive in, and if you drive further up the road there is a small pull-off with a couple of simple fire-pits where you will likely find a couple other climbers camping. Please be responsible about your food, trash and making a fire. There is loads of good climbing in the area and it's a great place to set up camp for a few days, but don't ruin that privilege for everyone by mistreating the area. Follow pack-in, pack-out, LNT and common sense rules.

Great place to stay for the night near Bosque del Apache

Finding this little park on the banks of the Rio Grande just outside of town in the dark would have been unlikely without the very specific directions given to us at Bosque Del Apache National Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center. “From the blinking light go east for 0.7 miles and turn left on the dirt road between the canal and the river.” Sure enough, there it is.

This small campground has about 5 sites, with picnic tables, but offers no other services—no water, fire rings or even toilets. But as the directions say, it’s close to town and it’s FREE. So, on a day where we spent most of the afternoon and watched the sunset while in the National Wildlife Refuge, this campsite served us well. We even planned to get up before sunrise to watch the birds take to the sky from their night-time roosting areas, so we weren’t there long. 

The wildlife refuge is a birder’s paradise during the late fall and winter. Species of Sand Hill Cranes, Snow Geese, Canada Geese, and a multitude of ducks winter here feeding on grain grown in nearby fields and roosting overnight in the shallow wetlands. The numbers of birds are overwhelming, and awe-inspiring. But when we learned that the Sand Hill Cranes have been making this journey for nearly 10 million years, we were simply blown away. 

There are plenty of opportunities for other recreation in the area, road cycling, mountain biking, hiking and motor-sports. As we pulled out of the campground, we noticed a beach buggy cruising by which looked as cool as it was retro – total ‘70s style. There are other free, “dry camps” in the area, BLM land, etc. as well as a few other RV parks offering shorter or longer stays.