RV Sites
Tent Sites
Fires Allowed
Pets Allowed
Water Unknown
About Apache Lake Campground
Access
Drive In
Walk In
Boat In
Features
+ More
Electric Hookups
Fires Allowed
Firewood Available
Pets Allowed
Phone Service
Picnic Table
Sanitary Dump
Showers
Toilets
Trash Available
Contact
Location
Apache Lake Campground is located in Arizona
Latitude
33.577 N
Longitude
-111.2537 W
Get Directions
1 Review of Apache Lake Campground
First to Review
Ranger Review of Primus Micron Trail Stove at Apache Lake in AZ

When traveling to new places, I want new things to look at and unique experiences when I camp. I couldn't have asked for a more unique first day in AZ when I made my way to Apache Lake Campground (at the Marina) in AZ. It was late when I arrived, and I was starved, so it was the perfect time to try my new Micron Trail Stove with Piezo by Primus!

CAMPGROUND REVIEW:

It says that it takes over an hour to go less than 30 miles to the campground, and I assumed this was one of those GPS errors…until I saw the road to get there. Mostly washboard dirt, a little asphalt and a lot of twists and turns. Upper speed limits of 20 mph made it very clear that the GPS knew what it was yapping about. At one point, I thought I was on a movie set and seriously didn't know how any car coming the opposite direction would pass, if it came to that. But all that aside, it was a beautiful, peaceful drive! Just don't do it in the dark. It's called the Apache Trail and it's Arizona's oldest highway, originally built in 1905. Serious history here! Absolutely worth the drive, if you don't have a fear of heights and have extra time to kill. It passes through a little town called Tortilla Flat and there is apparently an ice cream shop there with prickly pear gelato!

About the campground. It's deep in a valley, on Apache Lake. What a view!! Down a steep road that's about a mile off the main highway (Route 88), you can see the camp before you even get there. Once there, it's a little confusing to find what you need because signage isn't terribly apparent and it's a kind of "lazy-kicked-back" sort of atmosphere. Nothing up scale about it, at all. But that's part of it's charm. I guess I was there at the tail end of the "off" season, so it wasn't terribly busy. It's not fancy, by a long shot, but what you need is at your fingertips. You have to check in at the main building, which isn't very clear, especially upon arrival in the dark, but in the office, they will take your money, show you a map, and point you in the right direction.

There's a section for RVs with hookups (and they do have a dump station). There are restrooms in a few spots, and while not fancy, they let you "do the job" you came to do. Also some showers, and again, not the Ritz, but there is water to rinse with. I'd suggest shower shoes. The camping is kind of cool, though. It's dispersed. I mean, there are many little spots nested in the trees, around the lake, on the sand, where you can just pick a spot and stay. It was only $10 to pop a squat (I think it says $5 online, but that is incorrect). Some are far better than others (on little jetties or in the trees) but they all have sweet lake views and fire rings! You are allowed to collect dead wood to use, so that makes it easier to fire up at evenings end, but they sell firewood bundles too.

I had a little spot right off the lake, and it was quiet. A few night sounds, but nothing more than fish and birds. The only thing that bothered me were some bright lights, almost like on a jet plane, that were at the other end of the marina. I just positioned my tent so that I didn't get the runway lights right through my screen. In the morning, I took advantage of the big huge bathtub outside my tent (most people call that a lake) and took a very quick dip, since it was like ice water. Boy was it refreshing!!! Perfect little site for my first night in the desert. Not dessert. Big difference.

GEAR REVIEW:

As a Ranger for The Dyrt, I occasionally get the awesome opportunity to review incredibly gear in exchange for an honest review. This time, I was able to have a hot meal on Apache Lake thanks to the rockin' Micron Trail Stove with piezo by Primus.

This little think only weights about 3.2 oz, and folds up like a little contortionist to fit in a stuff sack that's actually got room enough to throw in a lighter. Some stoves have skin tight bags for storage, but this one is great! It has a built in piezo lighter and is easy to screw on a canister for use.

First impression: I love the size, the weight, it's solid construction, the stuff sack is the perfect size.

What I don't like: The piezo fizzled the third time I used it. Ugh.

It's super easy to use, even without reading directions. Just make sure it's screwed on the canister tightly. You don't want to strip the threads and have it launching into space, but if you don't twist it on hard enough, your flame will fail you and you'll sit there thinking you're going to have to eat your oatmeal cold. If that latter happens, try twisting just a little harder, and you'll get a better gas flow that'll give you the flame you need! We don't want hangry campers at bedtime.

While the piezo on mine didn't actually work by the time I got it to my camping trip, I found that I much preferred lighting it with a lighter, anyhow. I thought that the location and way that the piezo worked was a little delicate. Like I might break the whole stove by flicking it. Turns out that they make the same stove without the igniter for about $5 cheaper, and it saves you 14g of weight by not having it. So you have a choice!

Bottom line, I still love the stove. I'm normally an alcohol stove gal, so this was a great chance to explore the idea of a canister version to cook with. I can absolutely see this little Primus Micron making it's way into my cooler weather arsenal so that I can get more hot water, faster, for things like coffee, water bottles for my sleeping bag, and cocoa!