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Top Dispersed Camping near Mount Rainier National Park

Looking for the best dispersed camping near Mount Rainier National Park? Dispersed camping is an excellent way to get away from it all and to disconnect. Find the perfect dispersed campsite for your next adventure.

Best Dispersed Camping Sites Near Mount Rainier National Park, WA (38)

    Camper-submitted photo from White River Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from White River Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from White River Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from White River Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from White River Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from White River Dispersed Camping

    1.

    White River Dispersed Camping

    12 Reviews
    35 Photos
    447 Saves
    Greenwater, Washington

    The historic Mather Memorial Parkway (State Route 410) is the gateway to a recreational haven. On a clear day, enjoy spectacular views of Mt. Rainier. For more excitement, take a spin in the off-road vehicle area at Evans Creek, or zip down the slopes of Crystal Mountain Ski Area. Or if you prefer solitude, escape into the solace of the forest and leave the world behind.

    Mather Memorial Parkway Created in 1931, this paved two-lane classic Cascades drive along Highway 410 from Enumclaw to the eastern edge of Mount Rainier National Park presents majestic views of Mount Rainier and surrounding peaks. More than 200 miles of trails accommodate hikers, horses and mountain bikes. Drive, hike or ride to the Suntop Lookout Cabin at the top of Forest Road 7315. Choose a primitive campsite along forest roads east and west of the parkway. In November buy a permit at the Enumclaw office and take the family out to the woods to cut your own Christmas tree. Most forest roads are unpaved and minimally maintained. Cell phones have limited coverage in the mountains.

    Dispersed camping is the term used for camping in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Typically, it refers to roadside car camping, but also refers to backpacking in undeveloped sites. Dispersed camping means there are no services like trash removal, and amenities such as toilets, tables and fire pits, are not usually available.

    It is your responsibility to plan ahead and learn the extra skills necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resources scenic and unspoiled for other campers.

    Dispersed camping along Forest Service roads is allowed where there is adequate space to safely park completely off the roadway and not on any vegetation. Whether car camping or backpacking, choose an existing campsite on bare or compacted soil. Unless signed as an area where a fee is required, dispersed camping is free. Dispersed camping is prohibited in developed campgrounds and areas posted closed or no camping. Some designated Wilderness areas have additional restrictions.

    • Pets
    • Phone Service
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol
    Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Cora Lake Back Country
    Camper-submitted photo from Cora Lake Back Country
    Camper-submitted photo from Cora Lake Back Country
    Camper-submitted photo from Cora Lake Back Country
    Camper-submitted photo from Cora Lake Back Country
    Camper-submitted photo from Cora Lake Back Country

    3.

    Cora Lake Back Country

    3 Reviews
    19 Photos
    137 Saves
    Longmire, Washington

    This trail is open to hiker, motorcycle, horse and bicycle use. No motorized use from March 1 to June 30.

    This begins on Forest Road 8420 and climbs steeply to Big Creek and Cora Falls before reaching Cora Lake. Skirting the lake, it passes a junction with Teeley Creek Trail #251, enters a dense forest and climbs to its terminus on Forest Road 8440. Features include Cora Falls, Cora Lake, and High Rock.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park

    4.

    Ipsut Creek Camp — Mount Rainier National Park

    2 Reviews
    25 Photos
    72 Saves
    Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    Part of the Northern Loop Trail in Mount Rainier National Park.

    • Fires
    • Dispersed
    • Picnic Table
    • Toilets
    Camper-submitted photo from Skate Creek Dispersed

    5.

    Skate Creek Dispersed

    1 Review
    1 Photo
    196 Saves
    Longmire, Washington

    Dispersed camping, or camping outside of campgrounds, is permitted throughout most of the Forest! Always follow Leave No Trace principles and PACK-OUT all trash and leave the area cleaner than you found it.

    The Motor Vehicle Use Map shows the roads, trails and areas where you can legally drive. These roads, trails and areas are designated by type of motor vehicle allowed and the allowable season of use.

    The following guidelines apply to anyone camping outside of developed campgrounds on the National Forest:

    Camping

    Camp 100 feet away from lakes and streams. Camp outside of fragile meadows and restricted areas, preferably on bare or mineral soil. Leave your campsite cleaner than you found it. Clean up and remove any trash, manure and straw before leaving. Avoid trenching. Water

    Streams and lakes are home to many microscopic organisms; some of them can make you very sick! Treat your water or bring water from home. Never clean dishes in a stream or lake.

    Campfires

    Have extra water & shovel available to extinguish your fire. Never leave a fire unattended. Never burn plastic, aluminum or non-paper trash.
    Use an existing fire ring where available. If you need one, build it small and away from overhanging branches. Be sure your fire is DEAD OUT before you leave -- drown it, turn it, stir it until it's cool to the touch. Gather only dead and down wood for your campfire. Human Waste

    Choose a suitable spot at least 100 feet away from any stream or lake. Dig a hole 6 inches deep. After use, re-fill the hole with soil and replace the duff. This allows the waste to decompose naturally. Bury toilet paper in the same hole. Empty built-in or portable toilets at sanitary dump stations.

    • Dispersed
    • Market
    Camper-submitted photo from NF-52 Dispersed Camping

    6.

    NF-52 Dispersed Camping

    2 Reviews
    1 Photo
    79 Saves
    Longmire, Washington
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • ADA Access
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    Camper-submitted photo from Sluice Creek Dispersed Spot
    Camper-submitted photo from Sluice Creek Dispersed Spot
    • No image available
      • No image available

        9.

        Carbon River

        1 Review
        42 Saves
        Carbonado, Washington

        Dispersed camping is the term used for camping in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Typically, it refers to roadside car camping, but also refers to backpacking in undeveloped sites. Dispersed camping means there are no services like trash removal, and amenities such as toilets, tables and fire pits, are not usually available.

        It is your responsibility to plan ahead and learn the extra skills necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resources scenic and unspoiled for other campers.

        Dispersed camping along Forest Service roads is allowed where there is adequate space to safely park completely off the roadway and not on any vegetation. Whether car camping or backpacking, choose an existing campsite on bare or compacted soil. Unless signed as an area where a fee is required, dispersed camping is free. Dispersed camping is prohibited in developed campgrounds and areas posted closed or no camping. Some designated Wilderness areas have additional restrictions. For the best information on dispersed camping opportunities and local restrictions, please contact the nearest ranger district office.

        • Pets
        • Fires
        • RVs
        • Tents
        • Standard (Tent/RV)
        • Dispersed
        Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site
        Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site
        Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site
        Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site
        Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site
        Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site

        10.

        South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site

        7 Reviews
        18 Photos
        274 Saves
        Snoqualmie Pass, Washington

        Dispersed camping is the term used for camping in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Typically, it refers to roadside car camping, but also refers to backpacking in undeveloped sites. Dispersed camping means there are no services like trash removal, and amenities such as toilets, tables and fire pits, are not usually available.

        It is your responsibility to plan ahead and learn the extra skills necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resources scenic and unspoiled for other campers.

        Dispersed camping along Forest Service roads is allowed where there is adequate space to safely park completely off the roadway and not on any vegetation. Whether car camping or backpacking, choose an existing campsite on bare or compacted soil. Unless signed as an area where a fee is required, dispersed camping is free. Dispersed camping is prohibited in developed campgrounds and areas posted closed or no camping. Some designated Wilderness areas have additional restrictions. For the best information on dispersed camping opportunities and local restrictions, please contact the nearest ranger district office.

        Rules for Dispersed Camping These rules apply to car camping and backpacking

        You may camp in a dispersed area in an individual Ranger District for up to 14 days within a 30-day period. After 14 days, you must move to another Ranger District or off the National Forest until the 30 days has elapsed. Do not blaze new roads to campsites, create new campsites, clear ground, cut or harm vegetation or construct a trail. Do not drive beyond constructed physical barriers, such as berms or gates.
        Do not drive through streams or wetlands to access a camp. If campfires are legal in your location and you choose to have a campfire, pick a site with an existing fire pit. Do not create new fire pits. Make sure your campfire is always attended and is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave your site. Fires may be restricted or banned based on the fire danger rating. Follow Leave No Trace principles and come prepared to “Pack it in. Pack it out.” Pack all trash home. Dispose of human waste in a sanitary manner. In high use locations, areas above tree line and snow-covered areas it is not possible to bury human waste in a sanitary manner. It will need to be packed out and disposed of at home using a wag bag, blue bag, portable toilet or another Leave No Trace approved method.
        Do not block roads or gates. Keep food and scented items secure from wildlife by keeping a clean camp and store items in your vehicle or use a wildlife resistant storage canister. Failure to follow regulations can lead to legal consequences. Additional Forest rules and links to report crimes can be found on our Law Enforcement page.

        • Pets
        • Fires
        • Phone Service
        • RVs
        • Tents
        • Group
      Showing results 1-10 of 38 campgrounds

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      83 Reviews of 38 Mount Rainier National Park Campgrounds