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Top Equestrian Camping near Croatan National Forest

471 Reviews

Do you love the outdoors and horses? If you're looking for a rustic but comfortable experience, horse camping in Croatan National Forest is the way to go. Finding a place to stay in North Carolina while traveling with your horse is easy. These scenic and easy-to-reach Croatan National Forest campsites are perfect for equestrian campers.

Best Equestrian Camping Sites Near Croatan National Forest, NC (29)

  1. Camper-submitted photo from Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    1.

    Elkmont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    118 Reviews
    473 Photos
    950 Saves
    Gatlinburg, Tennessee

    Overview

    Located eight miles from Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Elkmont Campground is the largest and busiest campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. At an elevation of 2,150 feet, the area enjoys a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers.

    Recreation

    The Little River runs through the campground offering visitors the option to camp waterfront. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the Little River and countless other streams and rivers that snake through the mountains. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails easily accessible from Elkmont Campground. The nearby and popular Laurel Falls Trail leads to a spectacular 80-ft. waterfall. Hiking and fishing are not the only reasons for visiting the Smokies: Picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are popular activities. With around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies are the most biologically-diverse area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    Elkmont Campground has 200 tent / RV campsites with paved driveways, gravel tent pads, fire rings, and picnic tables. Although most sites will accommodate tents or RVs, extreme slope or length of driveway make certain sites more suitable for tents than RVs. Please check the descriptions and measurements of individual sites.In addition to these tent / RV sites, Elkmont has 20 walk-in sites for tents. Campers on these beautiful wooded sites will have a short walk from their parking area to their tent pad. Nine of Elkmont's campsites are wheelchair accessible ADA sites. These sites have wide concrete driveways, raised fire rings, and wheelchair accessible picnic tables. All of these sites are located near accessible restrooms. Three of the sites provide 5 amp electrical service for medical equipment. Restrooms at Elkmont Campground have flush toilets, cold running water, and utility sinks. Potable water is available at spigots near each restroom; use of hoses is not allowed. Elkmont Campground does NOT have electric, water, or sewer hook-ups. There is no RV dump/fill station at Elkmont campground. The nearest RV dump/fill station is located across from Sugarlands Visitor Center approximately 6 miles from Elkmont. Elkmont is strictly an overnight campground; there are no day-use facilities. The nearest picnic area is Metcalf Bottoms Picnic Area, west of Elkmont on Little River Road. Due to its central location and variety of amenities, Elkmont Campground tends to be heavily used during the summer vacation months and in October. Sites along Little River are in particularly high demand. Even when Elkmont is full, campsites are often available at Cosby Campground, located at the northeast corner of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    Natural Features

    Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Little River and Jakes Creek run through the campground, offering easy access for fishing or cool summertime splashing. Trailheads for Little River Trail, Jakes Creek Trail, and Elkmont Nature Trail are located adjacent to the campground. Historic remnants of Little River Lumber Company's logging camp and old buildings from the Elkmont resort community offer campers a glimpse of life at Elkmont nearly a century ago.

    Nearby Attractions

    Gatlinburg, one of the Smokies' most famous tourist towns, is located about nine miles from Elkmont and offers organized rafting trips, museums, restaurants, galleries, an aquarium, skiing and more.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night

  2. Camper-submitted photo from Townsend-Great Smokies KOA

    2.

    Townsend-Great Smokies KOA

    28 Reviews
    66 Photos
    249 Saves
    Townsend, Tennessee
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  3. Camper-submitted photo from Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    3.

    Smokemont Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    51 Reviews
    433 Photos
    403 Saves
    Cherokee, North Carolina

    Overview

    Situated in the stunning Great Smoky Mountains National Park, this sunny group camp offers an ideal setting for camping excursions. Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World-renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian culture, this is America's most visited national park.

    Recreation

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a hiker's paradise, with over 800 miles of maintained trails ranging from short, leg-stretchers to strenuous treks, with a number of those trails, including The Smokemont Loop Trail and the Bradley Fork Trail, accessible from the camp. But hiking is not the only reason for visiting the Smokies: Fishing, picnicking, wildlife viewing and auto touring are also popular activities. Campers can enjoy high-quality backcountry fishing in the cool waters of the countless streams and rivers that snake through the mountains, with trout available in abundance. The nearby Bradley Fork River provides a great place to splash in the stream or fish for trout. Wildlife viewing is a popular pastime, and with around 1,500 bears living in the park, it's not uncommon for visitors to spot one. From the big animals like bears, deer, and elk, down to microscopic organisms, the Smokies have the most biological diversity of any area in the world's temperate zone. The park is a sanctuary for a magnificent array of animal and plant life, all of which is protected for future generations to enjoy. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park.

    Facilities

    Smokemont Group Camp offers an unforgettable outdoor experience with the added convenience of flush toilets, drinking water and sinks. The campsites can accommodate up to 20 guests and provides tent pads, grills and fire rings. There is also a flat, grassy area that is perfect for group activities like football, volleyball or simply soaking up the sun.

    Natural Features

    Smokemont Group Camp is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges, blanketed in wildflowers during the spring and bursting with vivid foliage in the fall. At 2,200 feet, Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Great Smoky Mountains National Park preserves a rich cultural history of Southern Appalachia. From the pre-historic Paleo Indians to early 19th century European settlers, the park strives to protect the historic structures, landscapes and artifacts that tell the stories of the people who once called these mountains home.

    Nearby Attractions

    The adjacent Smokemont Campground provides additional camping facilities for smaller groups. The Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Oconaluftee Indian Village and Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, located six miles away in Cherokee, North Carolina, provides cultural and historical information about the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Cherokee also provides grocery stores and fuel.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Customers who cancel a group overnight facility reservation less than 14 days before the arrival date will pay a $10.00 service fee AND forfeit the first night's use fee.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian

    $50 / night

  4. Camper-submitted photo from Tsali Campground

    4.

    Tsali Campground

    12 Reviews
    10 Photos
    152 Saves
    Almond, North Carolina

    Enjoy mountain biking, horseback riding, fishing, motorized boating, kayaking or camping at Tsali Recreation Area, all located within steps of Fontana Lake. Follow the Trail. The Tsali (pronounced “SAH-lee”) Recreation Area’s four-loop trail system has become a popular destination for mountain bikers and horseback riders. It is best known as a challenging mountain bike course. The Right Loop , rated moderately difficult, offers 13.9 miles of single track, with shorter 4- and 8-mile loops possible. The Left Loop , rated moderately difficult, is 11.9 miles of single track with views toward the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Fontana Lake. The Mouse Branch Trail , rated moderately difficult, is 8.7 miles of single track and includes old logging roads. The Thompson Loop , rated moderately difficult, is 7.3 miles of single track. Hikers may travel the trails on any day, but mountain bikers and equestrians–the primary users–are kept separated by alternating days on the trails. Be sure to follow the trail schedule: Jan./Feb./March/April/June/Sept./Nov./Dec. Right Loop and Left Loop: Horses – Tuesday , Thursday, & Saturday Mountain Bikes –Monday, Wednesday, Friday & Sunday Mouse Branch and Thompson Loop: Horses – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, & Sunday Mountain Bikes – Tuesday, Thursday, & Saturday May/July/August/October Right Loop and Left Loop: Horses – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, & Sunday Mountain Bikes – Tuesday, Thursday, & Saturday Mouse Branch and Thompson Loop: Horses – Tuesday, Thursday, & Saturday Mountain Bikes – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, & Sunday There is a per-person day use fee for trail use. Fees can be paid at either the Tsali Bike or Horse Trailheads. Sleep under the Stars. Open early April through October, Tsali Campground offers 42 campsites on a first-come, first-served basis. Many sites accommodate small RVs, but no hookups are available. Each campsite has a picnic table, fire ring and lantern post. Accessible flush toilets, hot showers and drinking water are available. Campers pay fees at the campground fee station. Get in the Water. Fontana Lake offers flatwater paddling and motor boating. One boat launch is located at Tsali, while another is located nearby on FR 2553 at Lemmons Branch. Ample parking is available at either launch. Fishing is permitted year-round, and anglers will find some of the best fishing for walleye in the state. Anglers can also catch black bass, crappie, catfish and white bass. Check out the brochure.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access

    $10 - $20 / night

  5. Camper-submitted photo from Gee Creek Campground — Hiwassee/Ocoee Scenic River State Park
  6. Camper-submitted photo from Standing Indian Campground

    6.

    Standing Indian Campground

    19 Reviews
    49 Photos
    226 Saves
    Otto, North Carolina

    Overview

    Whether traveling with an RV or tent, Standing Indian Campground is a prime place to stop for a night or spend several days in the picturesque Nantahala National Forest. The campground's many amenities provide a comfortable home base for exploring this fun and historic section of the forest. Standing Indian is located within a 20-minute drive of Franklin, North Carolina.

    Recreation

    The Standing Indian Basin is a premier hiking destination. The campground provides access to numerous trails, including the world-famous Appalachian Trail, which journeys from Georgia to Maine. Visitors who wish to get their feet wet can experience the Nantahala River, well-known for whitewater rafting, kayaking and trout fishing (fishing license required). Big and small game hunting is available in the surrounding area.

    Facilities

    The campground has four loops with sites available first-come, first-served or by reservation. Sites are equipped with campfire rings, grills, lantern posts and picnic tables, and are in close proximity to drinking water, flush toilets and showers. A dump station is nearby. The campground also has a group camping area, Kimsey Creek.

    Natural Features

    The campground is surrounded by 5,000' peaks and crossed by several natural streams. It sits at an elevation of 3,880 feet at the headwaters of the scenic Nantahala River, amidst lush forests of evergreen trees and rhododendrons.

    Charges & Cancellations

    There is not a premium type site available but there is some nonelectric double site that is $40.00 per night.

    • Pets
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $40 / night

  7. Camper-submitted photo from Deep Creek Tube Center & Campground

    7.

    Deep Creek Tube Center & Campground

    14 Reviews
    76 Photos
    212 Saves
    Bryson City, North Carolina

    16 tents-only sites on the banks of Deep Creek. 10 creekside sites with power and full hookups 16 RV sites with power and full hook-ups 3 sheltered sites with water and electricity 10 big rig sites including 3 pull-through sites with full hook-ups and cable

    A cascading whitewater stream flowing out of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Rippling trout runs, sparkling waterfalls, natural swimming holes, mountain trails lined with wildflowers and a mile of the best whitewater tubing in the Smokies. That's Deep Creek, a family vacation paradise in the Great Smoky Mountains of Western North Carolina.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  8. Camper-submitted photo from Cherokee-Great Smokies KOA

    8.

    Cherokee-Great Smokies KOA

    25 Reviews
    128 Photos
    119 Saves
    Cherokee, North Carolina
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  9. Camper-submitted photo from Trackrock Campground & Cabins

    9.

    Trackrock Campground & Cabins

    17 Reviews
    83 Photos
    178 Saves
    Blairsville, Georgia

    Trackrock Campground & Cabins and Trackrock Stables is a 250 acre paradise of meadows, hayfields, and woodlands in the beautiful North Georgia Mountains. Located between Blairsville and Hiawassee, Trackrock is completely isolated from all other commercial developments. The property is bordered on three sides by the Chattahoochee National Forest.

    As a designated Appalachian Botanical Sanctuary, great care is taken to preserve the natural environment. Wildlife, flowers, and flowering shrubs are abundant throughout the campground and surrounding area.

    With our 95 level, shady, uncrowded campsites, Trackrock offers camping for everyone – tents, popups and RVs (max 40′ please). For RVs and pop ups, we offer both pull thru and back-in sites which include water, 30 and 50 amp electricity and sewer. We also offer water and electricity sites for tents. All sites have picnic tables and fire rings. Our modern bath houses are kept spotless and are equipped with hot showers. At Trackrock we are happy to host Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, group camping and church groups.

    For those who prefer not to camp, we have cozy, comfortable one and two bedroom cabins. The cabins are fully furnished and are ready for your immediate occupancy with full kitchens and baths, (bring your own towels) covered porches, and all modern amenities including air conditioning and satellite TV.

    For fun, we have horseback riding, summer horse camps, riding lessons, swimming, fishing, playgrounds, hiking trails, hayrides, picnic pavilions, and more.

    Folks have been enjoying the relaxing and refreshing North Georgia Mountains at Trackrock for more than 50 years. Why not join them?

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
  10. Camper-submitted photo from Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    10.

    Cataloochee Campground — Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    31 Reviews
    186 Photos
    226 Saves
    Maggie Valley, North Carolina

    Overview

    Cataloochee campground is located in the historic Cataloochee Valley--a relatively remote part of Smoky Mountain National Park. The secluded setting offers visitors the ability to enjoy a multitude of recreational activities like hiking and fishing, without the crowds, which are sometimes common in other parts of the park.

    Recreation

    The Cataloochee Valley features an extensive trail system that is less heavily used compared to other areas of the park. The two main trails, Caldwell Fork and nearby Rough Fork Trail, run mostly parallel to one another in the central portion of the valley. Either of these trails extend alongside scenic creeks and streams and support both hikers and horeseback riders. For hikers only, the 3.9-mile Boogerman Trail forms a nice loop off the Caldwell Fork Trail and is less than a mile walk from the campground. Anglers will agree that some of the best Rainbow and Brook trout fishing in the area can be found in the Cataloochee Basin, one of the most remote sections of the park. Fly fishing is particularly good during spring months when aquatic insects hatch in large numbers. The park also holds one of the best collections of log buildings in the eastern United States. Over 90 historic structures, including houses, barns, outbuildings, churches, schools and grist mills, have been preserved or rehabilitated in the park. A handful of which can be found in the Cataloochee Valley, including the nearby Palmer House, built in 1869, which contains a self-guided museum.

    Facilities

    Cataloochee offers a traditional outdoor camping experience with the added convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. There are no hookups or showers at the campground. Hiking trails and fishing streams are easily accessible from the site and the nearby Cataloochee Group Camp can accommodate larger parties of guests. Additionally, the Cataloochee Horse Camp provides convenient camping for horseback riding enthusiasts.

    Natural Features

    Cataloochee Campground is surrounded by picturesque mountain ranges and pristine mountain streams, like nearby Cataloochee Creek. Elk are common in this part of the park, during the spring and fall. At a 2,600 foot elevation, Cataloochee provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Whether blanketed in bright spring wildflowers or exploding with vivid fall colors, the scenery at Cataloochee never disappoints.

    Nearby Attractions

    A number of the park's famous historical buildings, including the Steve Woody and Caldwell Houses, both built in the late 19th-century, are nearby the campground. The Steve Woody House, built in 1880, is located along the Rough Fork trail, an easy 2-mile roundtrip hike from the parking lot at the end of Ranger Station Road.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $30 / night


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471 Reviews of 29 Croatan National Forest Campgrounds