Cabins
Tent Sites
No Fires
No Pets
Water Unknown
About Yellowjacket Guard Station

Yellowjacket Guard Station is a historic Forest Service Ranger Station and Work Center. Originally constructed in 1925 and remodeled in 1934 by the Civilian Conservation Corps, the structure is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Recreation

Hikers, horseback riders, mountain bikers and off-road enthusiasts will find many trails in the surrounding area. Hunting is also a popular activity. Click here for an Idaho OHV safety message

Facilities

The spacious guard station can sleep a maximum of four people in two bedrooms, with a double bed and one single bed. No linens or bedding are provided. The living room contains a couch, wood stove, table and chairs. The small kitchen is equipped with a propane range/oven, a propane refrigerator and sink, but no running water. Guests must bring their own drinking water, as well as dishes, utensils and cookware. The guard station is eqiuped with propane lights and a vault toilet is located outside.

Natural Features

The guard station sits in the Yellowjacket Mountains within the Salmon-Challis National Forest in Idaho. The sizable front porch awards views of the scenic mountain meadow surrounding the station. A dense conifer forest covers the mountains and a few aspens dot the landscape. Beagle Creek flows nearby.

Nearby Attractions

Bighorn Crags, Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area and Panther Creek.

ADA Access: N

Price
$40.00
Operator
USDA Forest Service
Access
Drive In
Features
No Electric Hookups
No Fires
No Pets
Not Reservable
No Sewer Hookups
No Showers
No Water Hookups
Location
Yellowjacket Guard Station is located in Idaho
Latitude
44.9947 N
Longitude
-114.4828 W
Get Directions
Directions
From Salmon, Idaho, take Highway 93 south 5 miles, to a right turn at Shoup Bridge onto Forest Road 021 and travel 44.5 miles to Cobalt Work Center facility on Panther Creek Road 055. Continue 8 miles south on Panther Creek Road, where you will come to Porphury Creek turnoff to the right, heading west. Continue approximately 11 miles along Porphury Creek Road/Forest Road 112 to Yellowjacket Guard Station.
1 Review of Yellowjacket Guard Station
First to Review
Great Wilderness Access

This is one of the coolest places that I have ever stayed. I stayed here for a couple of nights before venturing into the Frank Church. Although this spot isn't quite in the wilderness, it sure feels like it! Driving up to Yellowjacket and through the abandoned mine sites feels like a step into the past. The "ghost town" looks more like several abandoned mines, but is still so interesting to see. The guard station sits in a little meadow beside a creek in a small canyon. The first night that I stayed here, the loudest thunder that I have ever heard rolled through the area! This is truly a wild, unpredictable, beautiful place.  The guard station is a lovely building. Depending on the time of year, there is available water, as well as water from the creek. There is a fire ring surrounded by stump seating in the field. There is a pit toilet a little ways from the guard station that oddly smells like pipe tobacco. There are also corrals for horses, and it seems like a great place to go riding. There aren't official tent sites, but there is lots of flat, grassy spaces that several tents can be comfortably set up in. I was in this area for about 2 weeks and didn't see anyone I didn't plan to! A refreshing breath of solitude. It is a pretty far trek to drive out, make sure to have directions ready ahead of time. In mid-May, this place was seemed like ground-zero for ticks. Watch out and check often! Other wildlife seen included rattlesnakes and deer, and I wouldn't be surprised if Bigfoot was hanging out here somewhere. This is a really unique place to experience and a great starting point to explore the Frank Church Wilderness and Salmon-Challis National forest. I would absolutely recommend visiting this spot.