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Havasu Falls

44 Reviews
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About This Campground

Tribal Lands

Grand Canyon National Park

Arguably, one of the most stunning natural sights in the American Southwest is spectacular Havasu Falls, which tumbles over a redrock cliff and into a vivid turquoise pool. The brilliant colors and contrast of the scene make it appear surreal and otherworldly. But this is no roadside attraction.…

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Access

  • Walk In
    Park in a lot, walk to your campsite
  • Hike In
    Hike a trail to your campsite

Stay Connected

  • WiFi
    Unknown
  • Verizon
    Unknown
  • AT&T
    Unknown
  • T-Mobile
    Unknown

Site Types

  • Tent Sites
  • Dispersed
  • Group
  • Equestrian

Features

For Campers

  • Market
  • Trash
  • Picnic Table
  • Reservable
  • Drinking Water
  • Toilets
  • Fires

Reviews

44 Reviews of Havasu Falls

Ratings Breakdown

  • 0
  • 0
  • 1
  • 3
  • 40
Chris M.
Reviewed Sep. 3, 2020

Words can’t describe

This is by far one of the most beautiful places that I have ever camped. It’s at the bottom of the Grand Canyon on the havasupi reservation. Tickets are super hard to get. Arrive the night before and camp in the parking lot. It’s a hot 10 mile hike down to your location. You need to leave at least…

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Lyssa M.The Dyrt PRO User
Reviewed May. 4, 2020

Gorgeous

Challenging hike to the falls (easier earlier in the morning), but unlike anything you’ve seen before. Come to bask in the beauty of this natural wonder, carefully preserved and cared for by the Havasupai tribe to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude for allowing us to share in this beauty.

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Location

Havasu Falls is located in Arizona

Coordinates

36.25676506 N
112.7004434 W

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Nearby Campgrounds

About This Campground

Arguably, one of the most stunning natural sights in the American Southwest is spectacular Havasu Falls, which tumbles over a redrock cliff and into a vivid turquoise pool. The brilliant colors and contrast of the scene make it appear surreal and otherworldly. But this is no roadside attraction. The only way to enjoy this sight is to work for it—namely, by making the 10-mile hike down into Havasu Canyon, a tributary of the Grand Canyon. But before you can make the hike, you have to obtain a permit from the Havasupai Tribe (not the national park). Due to the sensitive nature of the canyon, and the limited space in the canyon to accommodate visitors, permits are very, very limited—and dayhiking into the canyon is not permitted. Permit reservations become available on Feb. 1, with camping available from Feb. 1 through Nov. 30. Permits are $100–$125/night; all reservations are for three nights. If you’re fortunate enough to obtain a coveted Havasu Canyon permit, the journey starts with an 8-mile trek from Hualapai Hilltop down to Havasupai Village. The route is waterless and mostly shadeless, where summer temps can soar above 100 degrees. The village has a lodge, cafe and small store. From the village, the “campground” in Havasu Canyon is another 2 miles down the canyon, and is not a traditional campground. Instead of designated campsites, the camp area is a mile-long stretch along the banks of Havasu Creek where you can pitch your tents wherever you like—however, you should choose sites away from the creek, and that don’t damage vegetation or nearby cliffs. There are picnic tables and vault toilets located in the camp area, and water can be obtained from a nearby spring; this should be treated (boiled or filtered) before drinking. Campfires are not permitted, but contained camp stoves are allowed. Campers in Havasu Canyon are invited to explore at will, but be courteous of their tribal hosts, and respect the land. Swimming in the brilliant blue pool beneath Havasu Falls is a must-do, especially on sweltering summer days. From the campground, you can hike 0.5 mile down the canyon to Mooney Falls, another spectacular waterfall in a sheer-walled amphitheater of red rock. Adventurers can continue down a series of ladders, steps and steep trail to follow the creek up to 8 miles down the canyon, where it empties into the Colorado River. This trail is strenuous and not recommended for children.

Connection Details

We rate connection speeds from campers like you who submit speed tests with Field Reports.

  • Good- 10+Mbps

    Campers can make calls and send texts & emails, watch an HD movie, play multiplayer games, and more.

  • Fair- 3Mbps-10Mbps

    Campers can make calls, send texts & emails, video chat, stream video, and play online games.

  • Poor- 0Mbps-3Mbps

    Campers might be able check email, send texts, and make calls.

  • Available-

    Campers have been able to connect here but we don’t know the quality of the connection.

  • Unknown-

    Connectivity is not known for this campground.

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