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Top Dispersed Camping near Bellevue, WA

47 Reviews

Looking for the best dispersed camping near Bellevue? The Dyrt can help you find the best dispersed campsites for your next trip. Each dispersed site offers quick access to one or more of Bellevue's most popular destinations.

Best Dispersed Camping Sites Near Bellevue, WA (22)

  1. Camper-submitted photo from South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site

    1.

    South Fork Snoqualmie River Dispersed Site

    7 Reviews
    18 Photos
    225 Saves
    Snoqualmie Pass, Washington

    Dispersed camping is the term used for camping in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Typically, it refers to roadside car camping, but also refers to backpacking in undeveloped sites. Dispersed camping means there are no services like trash removal, and amenities such as toilets, tables and fire pits, are not usually available.

    It is your responsibility to plan ahead and learn the extra skills necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resources scenic and unspoiled for other campers.

    Dispersed camping along Forest Service roads is allowed where there is adequate space to safely park completely off the roadway and not on any vegetation. Whether car camping or backpacking, choose an existing campsite on bare or compacted soil. Unless signed as an area where a fee is required, dispersed camping is free. Dispersed camping is prohibited in developed campgrounds and areas posted closed or no camping. Some designated Wilderness areas have additional restrictions. For the best information on dispersed camping opportunities and local restrictions, please contact the nearest ranger district office.

    Rules for Dispersed Camping These rules apply to car camping and backpacking

    You may camp in a dispersed area in an individual Ranger District for up to 14 days within a 30-day period. After 14 days, you must move to another Ranger District or off the National Forest until the 30 days has elapsed. Do not blaze new roads to campsites, create new campsites, clear ground, cut or harm vegetation or construct a trail. Do not drive beyond constructed physical barriers, such as berms or gates.
    Do not drive through streams or wetlands to access a camp. If campfires are legal in your location and you choose to have a campfire, pick a site with an existing fire pit. Do not create new fire pits. Make sure your campfire is always attended and is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave your site. Fires may be restricted or banned based on the fire danger rating. Follow Leave No Trace principles and come prepared to “Pack it in. Pack it out.” Pack all trash home. Dispose of human waste in a sanitary manner. In high use locations, areas above tree line and snow-covered areas it is not possible to bury human waste in a sanitary manner. It will need to be packed out and disposed of at home using a wag bag, blue bag, portable toilet or another Leave No Trace approved method.
    Do not block roads or gates. Keep food and scented items secure from wildlife by keeping a clean camp and store items in your vehicle or use a wildlife resistant storage canister. Failure to follow regulations can lead to legal consequences. Additional Forest rules and links to report crimes can be found on our Law Enforcement page.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group
  2. Camper-submitted photo from Joemma Beach State Park Campground

    2.

    Joemma Beach State Park Campground

    8 Reviews
    17 Photos
    209 Saves
    Lakebay, Washington
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • ADA Access
    • Trash
    • Picnic Table

    $12 / night

  3. Camper-submitted photo from Lake Dorothy

    3.

    Lake Dorothy

    2 Reviews
    65 Saves
    Skykomish, Washington

    A Northwestt Forest Pass (daily/annual) is required for entrance to Dorothy Lake. view more information here: https://www.wta.org/go-outside/passes#northwest-forest-pass-details

    • Pets
    • Dispersed
    • Toilets
    • Alcohol
  4. Camper-submitted photo from Annette Lake
  5. Camper-submitted photo from Ranger Creek Airstrip Dispersed
  6. Camper-submitted photo from US Highway 2 - Skykomish Area east to Stevens Pass

    6.

    US Highway 2 - Skykomish Area east to Stevens Pass

    4 Reviews
    2 Photos
    149 Saves
    Baring, Washington

    Traveling along Highway 2, enter the center of the forest along the Skykomish River, a rafting adventurers' dream. Grab your skis! In just two hours you will be gliding down the slopes at Stevens Pass Ski Area. Check in at the Stevens Pass Historic District for an overview of the area's colorful railroad and mining past. Recreation Area Map National Scenic Byway

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    • Dispersed

    $50 / night

  7. Camper-submitted photo from Old Cascades Highway Dispersed
  8. Camper-submitted photo from Mountain Loop Hway Dispersed Camp

    8.

    Mountain Loop Hway Dispersed Camp

    2 Reviews
    8 Photos
    47 Saves
    Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington

    What is Dispersed Camping? Dispersed camping is the term used for camping in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Typically, it refers to roadside car camping, but also refers to backpacking in undeveloped sites. Dispersed camping means there are no services like trash removal, and amenities such as toilets, tables and fire pits, are not usually available.

    It is your responsibility to plan ahead and learn the extra skills necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resources scenic and unspoiled for other campers.

    Dispersed camping along Forest Service roads is allowed where there is adequate space to safely park completely off the roadway and not on any vegetation. Whether car camping or backpacking, choose an existing campsite on bare or compacted soil. Unless signed as an area where a fee is required, dispersed camping is free. Dispersed camping is prohibited in developed campgrounds and areas posted closed or no camping. Some designated Wilderness areas have additional restrictions. For the best information on dispersed camping opportunities and local restrictions, please contact the nearest ranger district office.

    Rules for Dispersed Camping These rules apply to car camping and backpacking

    You may camp in a dispersed area in an individual Ranger District for up to 14 days within a 30-day period. After 14 days, you must move to another Ranger District or off the National Forest until the 30 days has elapsed. Do not blaze new roads to campsites, create new campsites, clear ground, cut or harm vegetation or construct a trail. Do not drive beyond constructed physical barriers, such as berms or gates.
    Do not drive through streams or wetlands to access a camp. If campfires are legal in your location and you choose to have a campfire, pick a site with an existing fire pit. Do not create new fire pits. Make sure your campfire is always attended and is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave your site. Fires may be restricted or banned based on the fire danger rating. Follow Leave No Trace principles and come prepared to “Pack it in. Pack it out.” Pack all trash home. Dispose of human waste in a sanitary manner. In high use locations, areas above tree line and snow-covered areas it is not possible to bury human waste in a sanitary manner. It will need to be packed out and disposed of at home using a wag bag, blue bag, portable toilet or another Leave No Trace approved method.
    Do not block roads or gates. Keep food and scented items secure from wildlife by keeping a clean camp and store items in your vehicle or use a wildlife resistant storage canister. Failure to follow regulations can lead to legal consequences. Additional Forest rules and links to report crimes can be found on our Law Enforcement page.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Dispersed
    • Market
  9. Camper-submitted photo from Keechelus Lake

    9.

    Keechelus Lake

    1 Review
    18 Saves
    Snoqualmie Pass, Washington
    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    • Dispersed
    • Picnic Table
  10. Camper-submitted photo from Dispersed Camping Beckler Creek

    10.

    Dispersed Camping Beckler Creek

    2 Reviews
    1 Photo
    107 Saves
    Skykomish, Washington

    Dispersed camping is the term used for camping in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground. Typically, it refers to roadside car camping, but also refers to backpacking in undeveloped sites. Dispersed camping means there are no services like trash removal, and amenities such as toilets, tables and fire pits, are not usually available.

    It is your responsibility to plan ahead and learn the extra skills necessary for dispersed camping. Camping rules and regulations apply to make your experience safe, and to keep the natural resource.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Dispersed
    • Alcohol

Popular Camping Styles near Bellevue

Pet-friendly camping near Bellevue

Recent Dispersed Reviews In Bellevue

47 Reviews of 22 Bellevue Campgrounds