Top Equestrian Camping near Umpqua National Forest

The Dyrt can help you find the perfect horse camping site near Umpqua National Forest. Finding a place to stay in Oregon while traveling with your horse is easy. These scenic and easy-to-reach Oregon campsites are perfect for your horse camping excursion.

Best Equestrian Camping Sites Near Umpqua National Forest, OR (9)

    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from Diamond Lake

    1.

    Diamond Lake

    58 Reviews
    148 Photos
    452 Saves
    Diamond Lake, Oregon

    Overview

    Meandering along most of the east shore of the mile-high Diamond Lake, this large campground boasts spectacular views of both Mount Bailey and Mount Thielsen, and offers visitors abundant recreational opportunities.

    Recreation

    At an elevation of 5,183 feet, Diamond Lake provides outdoor enthusiasts with a multitude of recreational opportunities year-round. The area offers a scenic backdrop for swimmers braving its cold, refreshing waters, and anglers casting a lines from boat or shoreline. Rainbow trout thrive in the lake, as it is stocked annually with 300,000 fingerlings. Bicyclists will enjoy riding on the 11-miles of paved trail around the lake, while hikers can head out for the day on one of many trails leaving from the area. Interpretive programs are offered on Saturday evenings at the campground amphitheater.

    Facilities

    At an elevation of 5,183 feet, Diamond Lake provides outdoor enthusiasts with a multitude of recreational opportunities year-round. The area offers a scenic backdrop for swimmers braving its cold, refreshing waters, and anglers casting a lines from boat or shoreline. Rainbow trout thrive in the lake, as it is stocked annually with 300,000 fingerlings. Bicyclists will enjoy riding on the 11-miles of paved trail around the lake, while hikers can head out for the day on one of many trails leaving from the area. Interpretive programs are offered on Saturday evenings at the campground amphitheater.

    Natural Features

    Explosive geologic events have shaped the distinctive landscape on the 984,602-acre Umpqua National Forest, and the area provides spectacular scenery as well as an abundance of natural and cultural resources. The translation of the word, "Umpqua," meaning "thundering waters," defines the area. High mountain lakes, heart-stopping rapids, peaceful ponds and thundering waterfalls, including the 272-foot Watson Falls on the North Umpqua Highway, are available to visitors. Several designated wilderness areas provide opportunities undisturbed solitude. Encompassing 19,100 acres, Boulder Creek Wilderness is an incredible landscape, with dense old growth forests and steep terrain that tower above Boulder Creek. The most popular area in Boulder Creek is Pine Bench. This flat area overlooking Boulder Creek is home to a grove of old growth Ponderosa pines. Diverse ecosystems support a wide range of habitat for wildlife common to the area. From eagles and owls, to salamanders and salmon, these species, along with many others, depend on surrounding undeveloped wilderness, clean streams, and diverse forests to live.

    Nearby Attractions

    Access to Diamond Lake is within walking distance, and boat ramps and fish cleaning stations are accessible to visitors. A nearby resort offers bicycle, boat and horse rentals as well as lodging, restaurants, a grocery store, laundry facilities and fuel. Trails for hiking and mountain biking are within 10 miles of the campground. Visitors may want to take some time to visit nearby Crater Lake National Park, the only national park in Oregon! The amazing Crater Lake area offers a glimpse into the volcanic history of the area. The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), one of the world's premier National Scenic Trails, showcases some of North America's most fantastic scenery, winding its way its way from Mexico to Canada through California, Oregon and Washington, and is accessible near the campground.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $16 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Natural Bridge Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Natural Bridge Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Natural Bridge Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Natural Bridge Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Natural Bridge Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Natural Bridge Campground

    2.

    Natural Bridge Campground

    9 Reviews
    27 Photos
    216 Saves
    Prospect, Oregon

    Natural Bridge Campground stretches along the scenic Upper Rogue River, with majestic conifers creating pleasantly shaded sites and privacy between campsites. The Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway and the Rogue Gorge are popular sites nearby. Additionally, the entrance to Crater Lake National Park is 11 miles away, making this campground a popular place for those venturing into the Park for day trips.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • ADA Access
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $15 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from NF 2612 Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from NF 2612 Dispersed Camping
    Camper-submitted photo from NF 2612 Dispersed Camping

    3.

    NF 2612 Dispersed Camping

    1 Review
    3 Photos
    47 Saves
    Diamond Lake, Oregon

    Many people enjoy the solitude of camping away from developed campgrounds. Many people prefer to drive out on a Forest Service road and pitch their tent near a stream or at a spot with a nice view. Call any of our ranger stations for recommendations about where to camp.

    Be aware that some areas may be closed to dispersed camping and that campfires may be prohibited in the summer, so call a ranger station ahead of time to ask. Generally, you cannot camp within a mile of developed recreation areas such as trailheads or picnic areas. Also, you cannot camp on the Forest for longer than 14 days at a time or more than 28 days in a year.

    There are usually no facilities or services available to dispersed campers, such as trash removal or toilets. Please practice Leave No Trace by using existing sites when possible, packing out your trash, camping 100 feet from water, and digging a 6-8 inch hole for human waste.

    • Pets
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Equestrian
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    • Dispersed
    Camper-submitted photo from North Waldo Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from North Waldo Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from North Waldo Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from North Waldo Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from North Waldo Lake
    Camper-submitted photo from North Waldo Lake

    4.

    North Waldo Lake

    12 Reviews
    40 Photos
    249 Saves
    Oakridge, Oregon

    Overview

    Waldo Lake is one of the largest natural lakes in Oregon. It offers a uniquely peaceful setting on the water and along remote shorelines, surrounded by forests of Douglas fir and mountain hemlock. Recreation in the area is abundant with the lake an ideal location for water activities like sailing, canoeing and swimming.

    Recreation

    Waldo Lake is circled by the Jim Weaver Loop, 20 miles of trail for hiking and biking. Bikes are allowed on the trails, but not in the nearby Waldo Lake Wilderness. There is also easy access to the Pacific Crest Trail and North Waldo is also a popular starting point for many wilderness trails and lakes, most notably the Rigdon, Wahanna and Torrey Lakes. There is a 1-mile Shoreline Trail between North Waldo Campground and Islet Campground which provides a short and pleasant hike along the lakeshore.

    Facilities

    Waldo Lake is circled by the Jim Weaver Loop, 20 miles of trail for hiking and biking. Bikes are allowed on the trails, but not in the nearby Waldo Lake Wilderness. There is also easy access to the Pacific Crest Trail and North Waldo is also a popular starting point for many wilderness trails and lakes, most notably the Rigdon, Wahanna and Torrey Lakes. There is a 1-mile Shoreline Trail between North Waldo Campground and Islet Campground which provides a short and pleasant hike along the lakeshore.

    Natural Features

    Situated high on the western slopes of the Oregon Cascades at 5,400 feet in elevation, Waldo Lake is one of the purest lakes in Oregon (9.8 square miles with a maximum depth of 427 feet). It has no permanent inlet to bring nutrients into the lake for plant growth. The lack of plant life contributes to its purity, allowing you to see to depths of 120 feet on a calm day.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Phone Service
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Group

    $27 - $40 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Imnaha Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Imnaha Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Imnaha Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Imnaha Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Imnaha Campground

    5.

    Imnaha Campground

    1 Review
    5 Photos
    35 Saves
    Prospect, Oregon

    Sites are located near Imnaha Creek. Activities and points of interest include structures constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corp in the 1930s, hiking trails and Imnaha Springs. Facilities 5 campsites Drinking water Vault toilet No garbage disposal - Please pack it out

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Equestrian
    • Picnic Table
    Camper-submitted photo from Kelsay Valley Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Kelsay Valley Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Kelsay Valley Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Kelsay Valley Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Kelsay Valley Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Kelsay Valley Horse Camp

    6.

    Kelsay Valley Horse Camp

    Be the first to review!
    12 Photos
    Diamond Lake, Oregon

    Overview

    This campground and trailhead is located along the Wild and Scenic North Umpqua River. Visitors will experience the river's rushing waters as they pass through lush high Cascade meadows. Spring arrives late in the high country and it is welcomed here with an explosion of colors. Purples, reds, yellows, greens, and white are arranged in a riotous bouquet. This site is designed to accommodate pack and saddle use as well as standard camping.

    Recreation

    The campground serves as a base camp for many trailheads that are local favorites for horse riding. Please be courteous and only reserve equestrian site(s) if you bring a horse. Campers in equestrian site(s) without pack or riding horses may be turned away or directed to another campground.

    Facilities

    The campground serves as a base camp for many trailheads that are local favorites for horse riding. Please be courteous and only reserve equestrian site(s) if you bring a horse. Campers in equestrian site(s) without pack or riding horses may be turned away or directed to another campground.

    Natural Features

    Umpqua National Forest visitors are often taken aback by unique and surprising landscapes shaped by explosive geologic events. The 984,602-acre forest provides spectacular scenery and an abundance of natural and cultural resources. The translation of the word, "Umpqua," meaning "thundering waters," defines the area. High mountain lakes, heart-stopping rapids, peaceful ponds and thundering waterfalls, including the 272-foot Watson Falls on the North Umpqua Highway, offer visitors a renewed sense of spirit. Diverse ecosystems support a wide range of habitat for wildlife. From eagles and owls to salamanders and salmon, these species, along with many others, depend on surrounding undeveloped wilderness, clean streams and diverse forests to live.

    Nearby Attractions

    This site provides access to Porcupine Connect Trail 1412A , which connects to the North Umpqua Trail 1414 and Windigo Pass Trail 1412 . The North Umpqua Trail heads southeast to enter Mount Thielsen Wilderness where it connects with the Tolo Creek Trail #1466 , Lucile Lake Trail #1459 , Maidu Lake Loop Trail, and the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail #2000 . In addition, Lemolo Lake and Resort are just a short drive away.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • RVs
    • Tents
    • Equestrian
    • Standard (Tent/RV)

    $10 / night

    Camper-submitted photo from Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park
    Camper-submitted photo from Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park

    7.

    Douglas County Fairgrounds RV Park

    2 Reviews
    10 Photos
    7 Saves
    Roseburg, Oregon
    • Pets
    • Electric Hookups
    • Phone Service
    • Reservable
    • ADA Access
    • RVs
    Camper-submitted photo from Harralson Horse Campground
    Camper-submitted photo from Harralson Horse Campground

    8.

    Harralson Horse Campground

    1 Review
    2 Photos
    2 Saves
    Deschutes National Forest, Oregon

    Although located away from the lake, this small horse camp offers a quiet camping opportunity for equestrians away from the busy North Waldo and Islet Campgrounds. Ride opportunities include: * The Harralson Trail (#4364), which connects the camp with the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (#2000) * The Jim Weaver Loop (Waldo Lake Trail #3590), which connects with trails in the Waldo Lake and Three Sisters Wildernesses. Note that there no equestrian improvements (corrals and hitching posts), as well as no water on site, so plan your visit accordingly. Picnic tables and fire rings are available. Drinking water can be obtained at North Waldo Campground and horses can be watered near the campground off of the Waldo Lake Trail (#3590). Please note that stock is not allowed in any of the Waldo Lake developed camps. Harralson is a good staging area for those wanting to explore the trails in or around the Three Sisters and Waldo Lake Wilderness areas. The trail around Waldo Lake is another nice ride, but be aware that stock is not allowed in any of the Waldo Lake campgrounds.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Tents
    • Group
    • Equestrian
    • Standard (Tent/RV)
    Camper-submitted photo from Whitefish Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Whitefish Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Whitefish Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Whitefish Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Whitefish Horse Camp
    Camper-submitted photo from Whitefish Horse Camp

    9.

    Whitefish Horse Camp

    Be the first to review!
    6 Photos
    Crescent, Oregon

    Overview

    In Deschutes National Forest, Whitefish Horse Campground offers visitors some of the most stunning scenery in central Oregon and easy access to an abundance of recreational activities in the Cascade region. A favorite among horse enthusiasts, the campground looks out onto the waters of Crescent Lake. With snow-capped peaks, high elevation lakes, scenic rivers, and several wilderness areas located nearby, this campground offers visitors the opportunity to experience both the serene and wild aspects of central Oregon.

    Recreation

    A favorite among horse enthusiasts, the campground provides visitors with access to a variety of trails. Lakes, lava flows, and forested areas provide the backdrop for many of these rides. Whitefish Creel Trail is popular with both hikers and horseback riders. This trail can be accessed from the west end of Crescent Lake and follows Whitefish Creek up through lodgepole pines to a beautiful view of Diamond Peak at Diamond View Lake. From there, the trail descends along Trapper Creek through Engelmann spruce and white fir to the west end of Odell Lake. Equestrians may want to traverse at least a portion of the spectacular Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), one of America's premier National Scenic Trails. This trail showcases some of North America's most fantastic scenery, winding its way its way from Mexico to Canada through California, Oregon and Washington. Portions of the trail traverse Diamond Peak at timberline. Wilderness passes are required for this trail.

    Facilities

    A favorite among horse enthusiasts, the campground provides visitors with access to a variety of trails. Lakes, lava flows, and forested areas provide the backdrop for many of these rides. Whitefish Creel Trail is popular with both hikers and horseback riders. This trail can be accessed from the west end of Crescent Lake and follows Whitefish Creek up through lodgepole pines to a beautiful view of Diamond Peak at Diamond View Lake. From there, the trail descends along Trapper Creek through Engelmann spruce and white fir to the west end of Odell Lake. Equestrians may want to traverse at least a portion of the spectacular Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), one of America's premier National Scenic Trails. This trail showcases some of North America's most fantastic scenery, winding its way its way from Mexico to Canada through California, Oregon and Washington. Portions of the trail traverse Diamond Peak at timberline. Wilderness passes are required for this trail.

    Natural Features

    Cresent Lake is nestled in a naturally glaciated basin behind a moraine dam, east of the towering Cascade Mountain Range. Its brilliant blue-green water, sandy beaches, and water temperature are exceptional for a high-elevation lake. The area provides habitat for mammals such as mule deer, coyote, and cougar. Migratory birds and native fish also call the area home. These species, along with many others, depend on surrounding undeveloped wilderness, clean streams, and diverse forests to live.

    Nearby Attractions

    Visitors can explore wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and approximately 1,600 miles of trails in the 2.5 million-acre Deschutes National Forest and adjacent Ochoco National Forest. Lava Lands Visitor Center in Bend, Oregon, is a great starting point for visitors to learn about the diverse landscape and history of the area through interpretive programs and exhibits. Visitors may also enjoy traveling the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway. The 66-mile drive through the Cascade Mountain range, weaves through snow-capped peaks and alpine lakes, highlighting the beauty of central Oregon.

    Charges & Cancellations

    Once your reservation start date has begun, neither the Recreation.gov Contact Center nor the campground manager will be able to modify your reservation.

    • Pets
    • Fires
    • Equestrian

    $19 - $21 / night


Recent Equestrian Reviews In Umpqua National Forest

84 Reviews of 9 Umpqua National Forest Campgrounds


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Frequently Asked Questions

Which is the most popular equestrian campsite near Umpqua National Forest?

According to TheDyrt.com, the most popular equestrian campground near Umpqua National Forest is Diamond Lake with a 4.4-star rating from 58 reviews.

What is the best site to find equestrian camping near Umpqua National Forest?

TheDyrt.com has all 9 equestrian camping locations near Umpqua National Forest, with real photos and reviews from campers.