Cabins
Group
Tent Sites
Fires Allowed
No Pets
Drinking Water
About Grant Grove Cabins
Operator
National Park
Access
Drive In
Features
+ More
ADA Accessible
Alcohol Allowed
Drinking Water
Electric Hookups
Fires Allowed
Firewood Available
Market
No Pets
Picnic Table
Reservable
Showers
Toilets
Trash Available
WiFi
Location
Grant Grove Cabins is located in California
Latitude
36.7417 N
Longitude
-118.9634 W
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3 Reviews of Grant Grove Cabins
Sequoia at its Best

Absolutely beautiful scenery all around. If you have never seen a giant sequoia tree, this is a must. From this site you are in the middle of the giant groves will easy access to the General Grant tree and others like it. Bear are prevalent so take precautions.

Nice cabins very close to giant sequoia groves

We were able to stay in the cabins for a night and they were small but clean. Some cabins have electric and some do not, but honestly, electric is not necessary while camping here so if you can’t don’t have it don’t worry. The area is very close to some awesome sequoia groves and was very quiet which was great. There are showers for people who stay in certain areas, but you need tokens from the front desk at check in. Don’t forget to ask, we didn’t know until we were naked, ready to go :). Hosts were very nice. Overall, great experience here.

First to Review
Our favorite place in this world

Somewhere up near the starry night a pinecone the size of a cat begins its descent to the soft, needle laden ground below. It softly thumps against a branch, and then another, and still another. What seems like minutes, indeed enough time to walk a ways down a path, or find the restroom, or toss a ball many times with kids, the soft thumping grows a little louder, and boldly becomes a clunk…clunk…thunk…until the pinecone emerges from the cover of limbs and lands…bouncing…on the ground at my feet. This is the mighty sugar pine; a tree whose girth is so large in its own right that our family of five cannot manage to stretch our arms, hand-in-hand, around the whole of the tree. And yet, like the small dog that mercilessly barks, the giant sugar pine displays its fantastically large pinecones as a means to say, "I am here", rather than get lost among the biggest trees in the world by volume---the giant sequoias.

This isn't just a land of giant trees. Sequoia and King's Canyon boast some of the most grandiose monuments in all of the continental United States: the deepest canyon, the tallest mountain, incredible caves, the view from Morro Rock, a collection of some of the highest mountain passes, and an expansive backcountry wilderness. Despite the many wonderful park visual aids to teach visitors about the size of these great sequoias, and even standing at the foot of these great trees, I found it impossible to comprehend their size. The extremes of this beautiful place bring with them a sense of humility, much like standing at the edge of the ocean, and all that remains is peace and serenity. While we found this park to be far more awe-inspiring than Yosemite, really than any of the any parks we've visited, it is far less touristed and crowded.

And then there is the wildlife. California Black Bears were resting in every meadow that we walked by, usually making a meal of grubs in the rotting logs. We stopped to let a mama Quail pass with all her babies in a row behind her. Marmots greeted us from the hidden nooks, running here and there to find something to nibble.

With a national park like this, I'd be willing to sleep in my car! But I didn't have to, fortunately. We stayed in a cabin in Grant Grove, centrally located in the park. The cabin was furnished perfectly, and included all that we needed for bedding. There was a lovely fire fueled stove outside on the covered patio. The showers were good enough and there was a place to wash dishes. Grant Village has a large market for groceries, a restaurant and a visitor center. There is a free shuttle that runs through the park to alleviate any concerns about parking. This review is for General Grant Cabins, which are reservable from a separate entity via the National Parks system. However, it is alongside a campground area where tents and RVs can be parked. This is marked cabins only due to the NPS divisions--search for the campground to learn how to set up a tent or park an RV at the very same location.