Standard (tent/RV)
Dispersed
Group
Tent Sites
Fires Unknown
Pets Unknown
Drinking Water
About Verlot Campground

Verlot Campground is located just off the Mountain Loop Highway in the stunning Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

Situated on the west side of the Cascades between the Canadian border and Mt. Rainier National Park, this area is one of the most spectacular in the the country, showcasing glacier-covered peaks, wide mountain meadows and old-growth forests, rich in history and outdoor opportunities.

Verlot is a relatively quiet camp, and its close proximity to the South Fork Stillaguamish River offers an ideal setting for visitors wanting to enjoy the serenity of the flowing water or the easy access to fishing.

Recreation

The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest has 1,500 miles of trails, ranging from smooth paths through deep, quiet forests to challenging ascents up boulder-studded mountains. Hiking opportunities abound for every skill level.

The Mt. Dickerman Trail, located near the campground, switchbacks steeply for 3 miles through a dark forest to an alpine meadow, replanted in 1915 after a major forest fire. From this point, the trail rises above the timberline to an alpine meadow alive with wildflowers in July and August.

The trail is in generally good condition, and spectacular views can be seen from all directions as the trail climbs to the 5723 foot summit.

Facilities

Verlot Campground offers standard sites, accommodating both tent and RV camping. Picnic tables, flush toilets and drinking water are also available, however there are no electrical hook-ups.

Access to the Stillaguamish River and Benson Creek is available from the campground.

Natural Features

The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest offers visitors the chance to discover, or rediscover nature on a personal level. Rugged peaks, scenic rivers, and interesting wildlife define the forest and surrounding designated wilderness areas.

On a clear day visitors will see Mt. Baker, the most prominent feature of the Mt. Baker Wilderness Area. Rising to an elevation of 10,781 feet, the active volcano from which the forest takes its name is perpetually snow-capped and mantled with an extensive network of creeping glaciers. Mt. Baker's summit, Grant Peak, is actually a 1,300-foot-deep mound of ice, which hides a massive volcanic crater.

On the banks of the Stillaguamish River, visitors can explore a unique ecosystem typical of the area. Old-growth forests line the wide, gently-flowing river, known for its salmon run. Populations of chinook, coho, chum, pink, and sockeye spawn in the river and its tributaries.

Nearby Attractions

Visit or stay in one of the historic lookouts in the area. Lookouts are tangible symbols of Forest Service heritage, perched on high peaks with unobstructed views, where they have been used throughout the years to detect and control fires in remote wildlands.

Take some time to visit nearby Mount Rainer National Park. Considered a wonderland, the park offers a fantastic glimpse into glaciers, subalpine ecology, and volcanic landscapes typical in the region.

Discover the Verlot Public Service Center, near the South Fork Stillaguamish River. Built by the Civilian Conservation Corps from 1933 to 1942, Verlot`s handsome buildings reflect the architectural style and fine craftsmanship of that era and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

ADA Access: N

Sites
26
Price
$18.34 - $40.67
Operator
National Forest
Access
Drive In
Walk In
Boat In
Features
ADA Accessible
Drinking Water
Electric Hookups
Firewood Available
Phone Service
Picnic Table
Sanitary Dump
Toilets
Trash Available
Water Hookups
Location
Verlot Campground is located in Washington
Latitude
48.0917 N
Longitude
-121.7847 W
Get Directions
Directions
From Seattle, go north on I-5 to Everett. Take Exit 194 onto Highway 2. Head north at Highway 204 toward Lake Stevens. Turn north on Highway 9. Turn east on Highway 92 to Granite Falls, WA. Campground is 10.8 miles east of Granite Falls.
8 Reviews of Verlot Campground
A home by the river

We had a spot right by the South Fork Stillaguamish River. We fell sleep and woke up to river sounds and were able to walk down to it straight from our site. There was also a cute sandy beach just at the edge of the campgrounds.

Great Campground run by the National Forest Service

This amazing little campground on mountain loop highway has it all. Rain forest like forest surrounds you with the South Fork Stillaguamish River to the side.There are plenty of opportunities for fishing, hiking or kayaking here also with a hike to a glacier cave close by. There are a couple of small towns close by for supplies as well.

 There are 26 tent/rv sites that are fairly spaced out. Each has a fire pt, picnic table and tent pad. They offer drinking water, flush toilets trash removal and also firewood from the camp host who was wonderful to talk to. The bathrooms were spotless and good smelling. There were berries in abundance here so remember to read up on what's safe(most I saw were)! The sites are 18 for a single or 36 for a double site, so pretty reasonable.

All in all there is no reason you should pass this great spot up, you'll be glad you stayed here.

Nestled in the lush old growth forest of the North Cascades

Situated beside the pristine Sauk River & two miles below the trailhead for Lake Twenty Two.

Verlot

Verlot is a great basic camp ground. Water and restrooms centrally located. Located by the Stilliguamish river, plenty of beautiful views of the mountains. Campground was very clean.

Camping at verlot

We got there a bit late in the evening but managed to set up camp quickly. We did tent camping and the ground was actually nicely flat and made for a good tent platform. The bathroom was well maintained and there was a picnic table at each location we saw along with a fire pit. Overall it was a good trip and would gladly return once more.

Camping in a van down by the river

The Verlot campground is in a beautiful location within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. This small campground showed us that sometimes camping down by the river in a van isn’t really a bad life decision. The campground themselves are 2 small loops that were nicely laid out with a good number of the 26 sites being on the water. Some of the sites are more secluded than other, and a few are setup to be combined with their neighbors to accommodate large groups. Our site (#13) was one of the sites which is more separated from the neighbors on both the left and right by fairly thick underbrush and mostly shaded with the river side being left completely open. We then had a little path right down to the river. Within the site itself you get a nice decent flat area for a tent or 2 and your standard table and fire ring with a grill. There are tons of potable water spigots located throughout the campgrounds and the restroom facilities were simple but clean and fully functional. This is a great location for either just relaxing and taking in the quiet sounds of nature or as a jumping off point to explore more of the National Forest and eventually the Northern Cascades National Park.

Amenities: standard picnic tables, fire rings + grill, flush toilets, potable water

Prohibited: pets off-leash

Nearby Hikes: Lake Twenty-Two Trail, and the Heather Lake Trail

peaceful

Beautiful grounds right near the South Fork of the Stillguamish. Out site was partially shaded so stayed pretty cool during the day. Typical sites, picnic table, fire pit. There are flushing toilets which are nice :). Nestled in some amazing trees, was pretty quiet when we were there.

First to Review
Well-situated between Seattle and the mountain loop

Stopped through here on a trip around the mountain loop. This is in a great location being accessible from the city but near all the great trails in the area. The campground features running water/flush toilets and has access to the river (which was much too cold for us to swim in but I imagine this is a thing). The scenery is pleasant but it's right near the road so keep that in mind. We didn't have too much issue with this, though some sites are closer to it than others.

On a Sunday in early June, folks were still able to get walk-up sites at lunch time.