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The Watson Place

1 Review
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About This Campground

With twisty mangrove tunnels and eerie waterways with names like “Alligator Creek,” the Watson Place campground in Everglades National Park fits right in. The Watson Place campground is the former home of Florida’s notorious outlaw and sugar cane plantation owner, Edgar Watson, known for killing…

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  • Tent Sites

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1 Review of The Watson Place

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Sarah C.The Dyrt PRO User
Reviewed Jul. 8, 2017

Know before you go!

This is a fantastic spot to spend a night or two, but before you spend any time here learn a bit about the history of this place. It's a little mysterious and a tad creepy, but it certainly makes staying here more interesting especially if you have an active imagination.

The site itself has a…

  • Camping area in the background
  • View from the dock
  • dock
Month of VisitFebruary

Location

The Watson Place is located in Florida

Coordinates

25.70963721 N
81.244898 W

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About This Campground

With twisty mangrove tunnels and eerie waterways with names like “Alligator Creek,” the Watson Place campground in Everglades National Park fits right in. The Watson Place campground is the former home of Florida’s notorious outlaw and sugar cane plantation owner, Edgar Watson, known for killing his workers rather than paying them. The story goes that Mr. Watson was gunned down at the site by fed-up residents in 1910. As a result, some locals believe the site is haunted.

In addition to its outlaw history, the Watson Place campground is a prime example of a Calusa shell mound. The Calusa tribe lived in the Everglades before European settlers brought diseases and destroyed their villages. They would collect shells, placing them together into large mounds, essentially creating small islands within the swampy environment.

Located along the Chatham River, the Watson Place campground is a large site that can accommodate groups. The open space is surrounded by dense vegetation that provides a remote feel at this boat-in only site. A wooden dock allows for easy access and a great spot to watch dolphins swim by as the sun sets.

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