the dyrt
Group
Tent Sites
Fires Allowed
Pets Allowed
Drinking Water
About Uvas Canyon County Park
Access
Drive In
Price
$34.00
Operator
County
Features
+ More
ADA Accessible
Alcohol Allowed
Drinking Water
Fires Allowed
Firewood Available
Pets Allowed
Picnic Table
Reservable
Showers
Toilets
Trash Available
Location
Uvas Canyon County Park is located in California
Latitude
37.085 N
Longitude
-121.793 W
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3 Reviews of Uvas Canyon County Park
Nice little campground in the woodsy canyon

A nice small campground nestled in the eastern side of Santa Cruz Mountains, west of Morgan Hill, easily accessible off of Highway 101. Short hikes along the Uvas Creek and Swanson creek are right next to the campground. Trails are narrow and steep at some places but mostly shaded. Small waterfalls are the highlights of the trail, but kids will enjoy playing in the water on hot days. The 25-site campground is relatively small, so camp sites are not big. That means this may not be for campers who like more privacy or quietness. Reservations are required. Very family friendly so expect it to be crowded on weekends and a level of noise and foot traffic by your site as well. Saw mostly tent campers and some pop-up trailers. Not sure if it can handle longer recreational vehicles and the road leading to the campground itself is quite narrow. If you plan to sleep in your car, you may want to take leveling blocks as I found the car parking spot to be not leveled at all. Well maintained/clean facilities. Restrooms and showers were clean, and some even have baby changing stations. Park ranger and County Maintenance's presence was there periodically to pick up trash and to clean facilities, etc. A little buggy in the afternoon and found some mosquitoes so take bug spray. Lots of birds. Good to be disconnected, but if needed, Verizon cell service worked at the campground. As of June 30th, camp fire is still allowed in the pits. As a fan of quiet camping, I would recommend this campground for a week day get away where you can enjoy more quiet surroundings and its nature sounds.

Hiking and Waterfalls

Uvas Canyon County Park https://www.sccgov.org/sites/parks/parkfinder/pages/uvascanyon.aspx is located about 15 miles west of Gilroy, on the east side of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Get any supplies you will need before you head out, as it is a long, winding drive to the campground and there is no cell service (at least for ATT) when you are there. The ranger does sell firewood though. Each campsite has a picnic table, storage locker and firepit/grill combo, but some campsites are much larger and more private than others. There are also clean bathrooms and showers, and drinking water available throughout the campground. It is tucked back in a canyon so once the sun goes down it can get cold quickly. The website above has a link to a map of the campground, as well as the trail network that runs through the park. Generally, the campsites on the outside of the loop will be larger and more private. There are a number of trailheads that start in the campground, or close by, that lead you to a collection of waterfalls and streams, and I highly recommend doing at least the waterfall loop, if not taking a whole day and exploring all the trails. Only downside is you can't get in the streams. It is a great campground, and even though you aren't far from the madness of Silicon Valley, it is quiet, peaceful and very beautiful.

First to Review
Uvas Canyon County Park

Getting there: From San Jose it took me about 40 minutes. The road is windy, narrow, and not for the car sick. Be prepared to pay $6 for parking.

Campsites: The campsites are nicely maintained. Plenty of area to pitch a tent, all the sites have a BBQ, fire pit, and picnic table. The sites are close together to maybe bring ear plugs in case you have loud neighbors.

The Park: Really pretty, really small. I would say in 1 full day you can explore 100% of this park. No need to make an entire weekend out of this place when you can do all of the pretty stuff in just a few hours.

What to do: Go see the waterfalls. With the current California drought all of the falls were at little more than a trickle but still something to see. To hike to each fall it's about 6ish miles with just a few hundred feet of total elevation gain. The trails are large and well defined for an very entry level experience.