No Fires
No Pets
No Drinking Water
About Lake Kontrashibuna Backcountry camping

Store food in a bear resistant food container or hang in a tree twelve feet off the ground and four feet away from the tree trunk. It may be difficult to locate trees large enough to properly hang food. Bear resistant food containers are strongly recommended and can be borrowed from the visitor center in Port Alsworth. It is strongly suggested that you put anything with an odor like sunscreen, toothpaste, and fishing gear in the container as well. Cook at least 100 yards away from your camp to avoid an association made by the bear between your camp and your food. Set up camp on a durable surface away from bear trails and river banks. Please follow Leave No Trace ethics and park rules and regulations when choosing campsites, storing food, and building campfires.

Operator
National Park Service
Access
Features
No ADA Access
No Drinking Water
No Electric Hookups
No Fires
No Pets
Not Reservable
No Sanitary Dump
No Sewer Hookups
No Showers
Toilets
No Water Hookups
Location
Lake Kontrashibuna Backcountry camping is located in Lake Clark National Park & Preserve in Alaska
Latitude
60.1971 N
Longitude
-154.3353 W
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1 Review of Lake Kontrashibuna Backcountry camping
Beautiful, serene lake close to Port Alsworth

Pure solitude: there is no other way to describe our time here.

We encountered maybe a handful of other hikers in three days around the Port Alsworth area of Lake Clark National Park. And it was amazing!

Because we didn’t want to take the one-day fly-in bear viewing trip here, we coordinated a series of regularly-scheduled bush plane flights with Lake & Pen Air to get the cheapest flights to and from Port Alsworth.

After landing, we hiked with our gear out to Lake Kontrashibuna, past Tanalian Falls, and to Lake Kontrashibuna. There are no designated sites, but some areas that were clearly used for that purpose. Ours was nestled along the lake, with great views and perfect hammock trees for napping.

Our full day at the park was spent climbing Tanalian Mountain. A few miles and 3,800 feet up the trail, you’ll receive sweeping views of both Lake Clark and Lake Kontrashibuna. And, very likely, no people.

You can read much more about our two days in the park on our blog: Switchback Kids (Lake Clark)