M.A.D. P.

Pro

swanton, VT

Joined September 2020

Our favorite Park in the whole Vt. State Park system

Quiet little park on Ricker Pond. I have been camping at this park for 50 years. 3 generations of our family get together when we can. The pond is great for swimming, kayaking, fishing and exploring. Plenty of things to do in the Groton State Forest as well. Plenty of prime lean-to and tent sites on the wate. Site #8 is our favorite but it is very popular

small and friendly State Park with plenty of things to do

Drove in on a whim and were pleasantly surprised by how well the staff accommodated us. We managed to get a prime leanto site right on the river. We were only there for an overnight but we will be back. In the Spring the water is released behind Ball Dam, creating a white water adventure. The prime lean-to sites on the water are beautiful and spacious.

There are also 4 remote sights for paddlers pn the Lake Champlain Paddlers Trail. You must call Burton Island State Park to make reservations

4 very nice remote campsites on the S.E. side of the island. Wake up to stunning sunrises and spectacular views of the Green Mountains. Spacious sites with fire rings. Shade is limited at certain times of the day. Nice hiking trails nearbye. These sites are separate from the State Park, even though reservations can only made by calling Burton Island. These sites are maintained by the park on behalf of Lake Champlain Paddlers Trail.

Nice secluded place for a picnic or a swim

No staff are present in the park. A self-service metal box is located at the entrance gate. A fee of a reasonable $4  is expected on the honor system  This is a good place for picnics, swimming and fishing. A few BBQ grills and picnic tables exist  There are no amenities and you will have to pack out what you packed in.

North Hero is also a stop on the Lake Champlain Paddlers Trail. There is plenty of room for tents and a few fire rings exist

A Vermont State Park for remote camping

Molly’s Falls Pond property consists of 1064 acres including the 411-acre pond. U.S. Route 2 traverses the northern edge of the property and there is a dam at the western end of the reservoir that is owned by Green Mountain Power Company. This 411-acre lake is largely undeveloped and is an excellent spot for swimming, boating and fishing. Anglers will find a variety of fish including rainbow trout, brown trout, northern pike, pickerel, smallmouth bass and yellow perch here. Camping and picnicking along the shores is accessible by a side road off from US. Route 2. There are 5 unofficial, remote campsites at the park. They are available on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a boat launch with 2 fishing platforms, plus a nearby port-o-let. Swimming is allowed off the shoreline, but is restricted at the boat launch. Additionally, there are 10 remote picnic sites.

Northern Forest Canoe Trail

This is only accessible by paddling the Missisquoi River. It is a very scenic spot and I have always found wood readily available. A small trail from the river leads to a bluff where there is a picnic table, fire ring and compsting toilet. There is plenty of room for several tents and hammock.

An awesome site

This is one of several sites found on Forestry Rd 55. The site we found is visible from the road but is best accessible with a 4x4 as it has a rocky entrance and can be muddy during heavy rains or spring thaw. We loved being on Clark Brook. The sites and sounds were soothing.

First to Review
State Park

A small and super friendly park. With several hiking options. Sites are clean and surrounded by forrest

State Park

Nice, clean, friendly park. Not a lot of trees for privacy, or for that wilderness feel, but the sites are spacious and the park has swimming pool with life guard. Nice park for cycling the Lake Champlain Byway.

State Park for remote camping

One of three neighboring island parks in Lake Champlain’s “inland sea”(along with Burton Island and Knight Island), Woods Island became Vermont's forty-fifth state park in 1985. Measuring one mile long and a quarter-mile wide, 125-acre Woods Island provides a unique habitat for a rich variety of plant life, including many species that are rare or threatened in Vermont.

There is no ferry service to the island and visitors must make their own arrangements. There are no docks; visitors must either beach their boat or anchor off. The beach tends to be fairly rocky, except for a point along the east shore, from which the walk to campsites is between one-quarter and three-quarters of a mile.

Woods Island is a“remote area” campground. Remote area campsites, while beautiful, are not for everybody. Sanitary facilities are minimal, and there is no potable water supply. Each campsite does have a fire ring and a nearby composting toilet. The island’s five campsites are situated around the two-mile shoreline, and are connected by a trail system. This gives you great privacy, but it also means you’re going to have to walk and carry your own gear from wherever you come ashore. If it is work, it is worth it! Camping is by reservation only on designated sites. Reservations(2-night minimum) Fires are permitted in designated fire rings only. Parking: Kill Kare State Park is the best place to park and get directions for boating to Woods Island, Knight Island or Burton Island.

https://hotshoe11.tumblr.com/post/150799746050/memories-from-woods-island-state-park

State Park

Lake front leento's have amazing view of mountains and sunrises. Plenty of tent, rv sites as well as secluded leanto's. Plenty of recreational opportunities

First to Review
An unexpected gem