MarinMaverick

Pro

San Geronimo , CA

Joined October 2019

Northshore - Lake Britton

Unlike the other campground on Lake Bitton (Dusty Campground) this is a more developed campground. It can be reserved - through PGE.

There is water. There are showers.  And it is much larger - 20 plus sites. It can accomodate trailers. Lots of people here with boats as there is a boat launch. Sites have tables and fire rings.  Pretty open so privacy can be an issue.

Towards the end of the summer the lake can get "murky" and full of algae.  So you won't be swimming say in September.  The lake offers fishing, boating and kayaking,  Easy access from the campground. There is a "beach" like area on the lake.

If you get there at the end of the season you will get fall color.

Yo are an easy ride to get to Burney Falls State Park - or you can go across the lake to get h=there.

Dusty Campground on Lake Britton

There is also a north campground called northshore on Lake Britton.  This is a review of the very small but great Dusty Campground. on the south eastern side of the lake.  I am a tent camper so reviewed from that perspective. Not sure trailers could get down there.

It is very small - less than 10 sites, but each is right on the lake.  Lake Britton is great - seldom crowded during the week.  You can fish, boat, kayak etc.  But be aware that for "swimming" late in the summer and early fall it "mucks" up with algae so is really not for swimming then.

These sites are on the lake under oaks and pines. The campground is run by PG & E. The water comes from their Pit River complex and is regulated.  There is a large dam at one end of the lake.

There  are vault toilets. Each site has a picnic table and fire ring. There is no water.

You are real close to McArther Burney Falls State Park.

If you are into fall colors this is the place.

Be aware - no rservations - first come first served.

Like the lower loop

Do not get me wrong. Samuel P. Taylor is a great redwood park. But for camping I like the lower loop as it is on the Creek. The upper loop is on the hillside. Larger sites. Mixed redwoods. But you are on the hillside not the Creek.

Sites have tables. food storage and fire rings. Nice bathrooms and showers.

Good hiking trails. Great creek with a couple swimming holes. Great place for bikes. Cross Marin trail goes thru park.

Best Along The Creek

There are two loops here. What is the lower loop is a smaller number of sites which are all on the creek. The first few you park on the road and carry your equipment down to your site. It is a short distance. The last few sites on this loop are typical drive in sites.

This loop being on the Creek I like better for tent camping. Redwoods on a creek what more do you need.

Table, fire pit, food locker. Restroom with showers.

Swimming holes in the creek but most of it is low flow and shallow (except in winter).

Great hiking. Great for bikes. The Cross Marin trail goes thru the park whchc is a paved bike path thru the redwoods.

Black Rock Campground - Joshua Tree - Place to Start Your Trek

This campground is a little outside the main Joshua Tree area.  It used to be the only campground you could reserve ahead.  So we usually spend the first night here and then head into the main park in the morning.  It has full facilites and water on sight. It has a small visitor center/ranger station as well.

You drive through a residential area and then you are at the campground.  You are on a knoll or incline so you are looking down over the valley.  There is horse site as well but I do not know the details of that.

We are tent campers. There are  good tent sites as well RV sites.  A great place to watch the star, the sunset and the sunrise.  Trail right fromt= the campground up to a hill/mountain behind the campground.

Be prepared.  We have been snowed on here and wind whipped. Always go in February.

Sites have tables, fire rings and water. Modern bathrooms.

You are surrounded by Joshua Trees and if you catch them in the right time they are blooming.

Beach Bluff

I am a tent camper so rating this site is a bit hard.  If I had a van or camper the rating would be higher.

You are perched out in the open on a bluff above the ocean.  So the view and sunsets are epic.  But being on the bluff when the wind comes in, in a tent with no cover, it can be fierce.  Also you are right next to highway one, so there is also the noise factor.  Not much traffic at night, however, but trucks during the day.

It is a good launch site to get to the southern end of the Lost Coast.  Also close to the UC Angelo Coast Range Reserve which has great hikig trails.

Minamalist site - table and fire ring with primitive toilets.

Eel River Access

Not sure I would consider this as a destination, more of "on the way" stop. That being said you can spend some quality time here in the redwoods, and when the water is right, hang in the Eel River.

I have always used it to pass through when I am on my way north and got a late start. Not sure that is fair to the area.

It has redwoods, and some real old ones. It has a river which can be roaring or meandering. You can hang in the river and you can fish. While it is off Highway 101 I was not disturbed by the noise (maybe I was just tired). It can be hot in the summer but is temperate in the spring and fall. Site are in the redwoods so pretty and private. Have tables, fire rings and food storage. There are three loops, one on the opposite side of the river but they are not always open- depends in height of the river.

This campground is the loop on the left or south side of the easterns side of thh Eel river.  Except in summer, usually etiher it or the Hickey loop (the northern lopp) are open.  I like to be along the river so try to snag a site in the loop which is on teh river bluff. You are not actually on the river but on a bluff above the river. This is a river canyon.

Eel River Access

Not sure I would consider this as a destination, more of "on the way" stop. That being said you can spend some quality time here in the redwoods, and when the water is right, hang in the Eel River.

I have always used it to pass through when I am on my way north and got a late start. Not sure that is fair to the area.

It has redwoods, and some real old ones. It has a river which can be roaring or meandering. You can hang in the river and you can fish. While it is off Highway 101 I was not disturbed by the noise (maybe I was just tired). It can be hot in the summer but is temperate in the spring and fall.

Sites are in the redwoods so pretty and private. Have tables, fire rings and food storage. There are three loops, one on the opposite side of the river but they are not always open- depends in height of the river. I like to be along the river so try to snag a site in the Hickey loop

You are not actually on the river but on a bluff above the river. This is a river canyon.

On Your Way North

Not sure I would consider this as a destination, more of "on the way" stop.  That being said you can spend some quality time here in the redwoods, and when the water is right, hang in the Eel River.  I have always used it to pass through when I am on my way north and got a late start. Not sure that is fair to the area.

It has redwoods, and some real old ones.  It has a river which can be roaring or meandering. You can hang in the river and you can fish.  While it is off Highway 101 I was not disturbed by the noise (maybe I was just tired).  It can be hot in teh summer but is temperate in the spring and fall.

Site are in the redwoods so pretty and private. Have tables, fire rings and food storage.

There are three loops, one on the opposite side of the river but they are not always open - depends in height of the river.  I like to be along the river so try to snag a site in the Hickey loop You are not actaully on the river but on a bluff above the river.  This is a river canyon.

Another Hidden Gem

You wander down a road with signs all over that this is private property and you wonder if you are lost. And then you see the campground to the right and the beach and boat launch straight ahead.  You have found it.

This small campground (in the midst of native lands) is right on the Big Lagoon, one of many, in this area. And it is a short walk to a beach where agates abound.  And all off the beaten path.

First come, first served so plan accordingly. On weekends can be packed but I was there on a weekday.  Also was there six years ago and had a similar experieince.  On the freshwater lagoon you can kayak, canoe, paddle board etc.  There are lots of birds to watch.  On the beach there is large expanse and you can hunt for agates.

A well maintained park with a host (who has wood) good wooded sites with privacy and typical tables, fire pits.  The restrooms were clean and there are coin showers as well. Less expensive then the state parks and can be less crowded.

Things Are in Flux...

This is a site, very small, right off the highway (noisy) but right on the beach (sunset).  I have stayed here before - driving through - but this time things are in flux.  They are redoing the sites - some are open - some roped off.  So there were folks in sites and folks camping in the parking lot.  Seemed like no one was in charge.

But the roped off sites show they have upped their game.  There are site improvements with new tables, fire pits and better delineation of sites. New parking lot.

The sites are right next to each other with no privacy.  That coupled with the location near the road, you will not be hanging in your site.  But you are directly on a large expansive beach.

Beautiful Tidepools and Sunsets

When you go - get a campsite that backs onto the bluff (rim trial) and you can watch the sunset each night from your campsite.

I love the Trinidad area, from the harbor to Moonstone Beach. And the best way to see the area is at Patrick's Point.  You are on the coast, by the beach, so think damp and wind.  the sites (there are several loops) all are a bit different. I like the Abalone Loop because you can get a site on the bluff. You can walk ten steps and watch the sunset each night.

As an added bonus you will hear the seals barking as you go to sleep..

There are great tidepools here.  You need to hike down to them and the tide needs to be right.  There is a native american village to explore, trails to walk and views to take in at every point.

Not sure why, but usually do not have a problem getting a reservation or extending my stay.

Some of the sites have wear - the wood on the tables and food storage lockers shows the effects of the damp air. Just bring a tablecloth and you will be fine. Coin operated showers also show wear but are functional. Usual tabel, fire ring and food sotrage lockers.

North Coast Camping At It's Best

I love to return to this place.  It has campsites in a redwood forest along a small stream. And then there is a meadow in front where the elk come down to graze.  They have benches all around the meadow so you can watch the elk from a safe distance.

There are miles and miles of trails through old growth (and second growth) redwoods.

Magical. You can hike to the beach, pick up a section of the coastal trail, or simply visit different groves of redwoods.

It can be damp here - think beach and redwoods, so be prepared fro dampness.

Siate ahe typical tables, fire rings and food lockers. Clean rest room and coin showers as well.

You can strike out north to the mighty Klamath River, over the hill to the Fern Canyon or hang with the elk.

Great Beach Camping - Windy

So after driving a dirt road over a hill you come to a wide expanse of beach.  Here there are campsites (including a few hike in ones) on the beach.  The sites are for the most part open and subject to the wind and sand.  But you are on the beach!

Trailers can not go over the road so you have vans and truck units and tents here. Since you are on the beach think wind - sand. Bring things that provide cover as you are in the open for the most part (see photos). But if you love the beach, this is for you.

You can easiliy access the Coastal Trail and get to Fern Canyon from here.  Also you can hike in from the visitor center for the hike in spots.  And if you are lucky the Elk will come down to visit.

Has Tent Only Sites

Summit lake is a great place to hang.  There are campgrounds on either side of the lake and this one is the more primate of the two - no flush toilets.  That said there are some sites right on the lake and an area just for tents- no generators!

Some sites are a bit open - due to elevation tall trees with little underneath - so some sites not real private.

The location is good and you have easy access to both sides of Lassen.  Also connected to great hiking.

Beautiful Lake & Park

This campground is BIG. there are four loops of sites.  I am a tent camper so this area can be on the crowded side for me with not enough privacy.

That being said the lake is beautiful. Easy access for kayaks and canoes.

The sites are clean, have table, food locker and fire sit.  Bathrooms are flush with showers available.  Close by are cabins to rent on the lake and a store, rentals and even gas,

Great jumping off site to get thru Lassen Park. Can take 45 minutes to get to the other side but there is lots of hiking and incredible views.  And crazy geo thermal sites such as Bumpass Hell.

First to Review
Sweet Fishing Site

Small campground along Hat Creek.  Not as crowded as some of the other campgrounds in the area. But great to fish. Across the road is a picnic area and there is good fishing there as well. Other than fishing this is simply a place to relax.

Amenities are minimal. Table, locker, and fire circle. Flush toilets.  It is only open seasonally - closed in winter. Can get hot in the summer but there are trees for shade.  Some sites are right on the road so best to get there early to be away from road and closer to the creek.

But you can not fish from the bridge!

Access To The Delta

I am a tent camper and there are some good tent sites here.  A bit open so can be windy but pick your site.

Access to the Delta with a boat ramp.  Access to fishing all around you. Beyond water sports not a lot to do here but relax. Or go fly a kite.

Social Camping & Sharing At It's Best

I am a tent camper and I am not a climber.  And I usually have some "youths" with me when I camp.  I stand in line for Camp 4 for a reason.  It is where most of the campers are climbers.  You share your site with others.  It is a great place to learn to share and also a great place just for campfire stories and to meet your neighbors. Best climbings stories ever are shared here.

When I feel socialable this is a good place to be. You will share a site, probabaly a food storage locker and be close to your neighbors.  If you do not store your food in the locker you will have visitors.  The large bear kind or the small aggressive ground squirrel kind.

You are in Yosemite Valley on the bus line.  You can get anywhere from here.

Crowds, Crowds, Camping

I am a tent camper so bear that in mind. Do not get me wrong, pinecrest lake is beautiful.  And if you take the trail to the backside of the lake you get access to great granite back country.

But this campground is big. BIG. and crowded.  And then so many people come in for day use that it is a mob.  The layout is open not private.  Lots of tall trees but no understory.

I did camp here when it was only partially open at the end of the season - October and I pretty much had the place to myself as the "season" was over. While cold I could enjoy the lake without the movies nights, boats and crowds on the beach.

The campground has everything - table, fire pit, storage locker and bathrooms.