Lee D.
West Des Moines, IA
Joined September 2018
Retired in 2017 and my husband and I have been traveling in our camper van about 75% of the time ever since.
Beautiful Gorge

After spending several very quiet nights in sparsely occupied campgrounds, we arrived at Watkins Glen to a full campground. The Six Nation Campground is comprised of six loops, each named after a tribe, with a total of over 300 sites. It looked like some of the sites were being rehabbed. The Mohawk Loop is the only one with electric hookups. There are also cabins, but I did not see them. Rates vary depending on how many nights you spend, whether you have an electric or non-electric site, and if you are a NY resident or not. Although the sites are spaced a decent amount apart, most do not have trees or any other barrier to separate them. However, despite our loop being completely full, we did not feel too close to our neighbors. The bathroom/shower facility was reasonably clean. There are two shower stalls and four toilets, and I feared it might be overwhelmed when the loop was full, but I never had to wait. 

There is a large day-use area with some nice playground equipment and there are additional playground areas (not as nice) in the loops. There is also a swimming pool but since we were there in October, it had already closed for the season (despite temperatures hovering near 90 degrees)! Normally, there is a trail that leads from the campground to the South Rim Trail, from which you can access the Gorge and other trails, however, due to recent heavy rains, this trail was closed when we were there. There are three access points to the trails: south entrance, upper entrance, or main entrance. From any of these, you can do a loop or just part of the trails. The most popular Gorge trail can get very crowded. We arrived at 10 am on a Tuesday in October and by the time we left at noon, the trail was much more crowded. I can only imagine how crowded it could get on the weekends (judging by the size of the parking lot). 

We travel a lot around the country and as such, trash and recycling policies can vary greatly. There was a sign on all the dumpsters listing materials accepted for recycling so we assumed we should use one dumpster for all garbage and recycling (this is how it was in Acadia NP). It wasn’t until later that we saw on a bulletin board that there is a recycling bin near the camp office. This could easily be confusing and could easily be remedied with additional information on the sign indicating where to bring recyclables!

Waterfalls!!

The biggest draw to this state park (which no one in Pennsylvania I spoke with seemed to know about) is the 22 waterfalls! We saw 18 of them on a four-mile moderate hike, but if you want to see the additional four, you could make it a seven-mile hike. The trails are very well marked. 

We stayed in the large loop, which is a peninsula on Lake Jean. Many of the sites have lake views. The bathhouse was clean but not adequate for 73 sites. The campground was about ¾ full and there was often a wait in the bathroom. Showers looked reasonable but I did not use them.

There were many tent campers in this loop, which does not allow pets (the other, smaller loop does allow pets). There are no hookups at all in the park. The water had been tested earlier in the season and unsafe levels of manganese were detected. All water spigots were shut off and covered but we were told it was safe to wash our dishes and brush our teeth. However, the water for the dishwashing sink was turned off as well as the water in the restroom at the trailhead. Since we had a reservation, we received a phone call in advance of our stay letting us know about this.

There are trails to the beach, but we woke to rain the next morning, so we did not explore this. 

One trash/recycle area a distance away from the campsites which seems typical for PA state parks. Alcohol is strictly forbidden– we were warned that if a ranger saw any alcohol outside of our vehicle, we would be cited. Quiet hours are 9 pm– 8 am, which is more restrictive than other state parks, however, some did not observe these quiet hours (a guitar-playing singing camper thought he was talented, but I disagree!)

Nice Pennsylvania State Park

Very large park with a variety of campsites ranging from tent, 20/30 amp, 50 amp, and yurts. Price is the same for all electric sites, regardless of amperage. There is a 40-foot maximum vehicle length allowed in the campground– not a problem for our 17-foot van but the staffer who checked us in remarked that many people come in with larger rigs trying to squeeze in and are unable to. We had no problem securing a site with no reservation on a Monday evening after Labor Day. Very close to two Frank Lloyd Wright properties– Kentuck Knob and the more widely known Falling Waters. Other things to do in or near the park include whitewater rafting, rail trail biking, hiking, zip-lining and touring Laurel Caverns. The nearby town of Ohiopyle has many outfitters and several restaurants. The sites are all located on roads leading off the main road; we stayed in a 20/30amp site on Cherry Road (Site 49). It was right next to the bathroom which was good and bad. Good for proximity but bad because we could hear the hum quite clearly. Also, the door to the women’s room would hit you in the rear quite forcefully unless you held onto it (it took me three times to remember to do this)! There was a dishwashing sink in the women’s room (and I’m assuming in the men’s room?); it was very clean, but the only downside was having to do the dishes by myself! Alcohol is prohibited. Only certain areas allow pets. Only one garbage/recycling station outside of the campground. Wood and ice are available 24/7 on the honor system– very nice not to have to wait until a host is on duty to get what you need. Quiet hours 9 pm-8 am, a bit longer than most campgrounds but except for some sites with campfires still burning with people talking, it was very quiet in this campground. Surprisingly strong cell signal for being deep in the woods.

Nice but not the nicest NY State Park

This is a HUGE state park campground with 355 sites (although a number of them were being restored when we were there). Most of the sites are on the lake; some have more of a direct view while others have a filtered view through the trees. The sites are very close together and some have trees to provide privacy, but many do not. We were fortunate to have an empty site on either side of us, otherwise it would have felt very crowded. Site 27 did not have an obvious “driveway” and it looks like the last rainfall caused the person in this site to get stuck in the mud as tire tracks remained. The sites are also littered with pinecones and tree roots, so you must be cautious not to trip on them. The bathrooms are clean but small and don’t have air dryers, hooks, or garbage receptacles. The showers had been shut down for the season, but we received a phone call in advance letting us know of this and the alternative available showers in a nearby park. There is one garbage/recycling area in the park. There is a paved roadway that goes all the way around Fish Creek Pond and Square Pond, making it good for bicycling or walking. Nice amphitheater. Also saw basketball and volleyball nets plus a very small swing set

Not the bargain it used to be!

I read the reviews and was excited to be in a state park near the water for such a reasonable price. Imagine my surprise when we found out that a water/electric site for an out of state camper was $45 per night! This was our first visit to a Rhode Island State Park so not sure if they are all like this but this one definitely caters to Rhode Island residents who camp in large RVs! The sites with the best views are the full hookups (water/electric/sewer) and the rates for out of state campers are significantly more than for residents. I’m used to paying $5 or even $10 more for being from out of state but here the fee is double or more for out-of-state campers. Geez– way to make us feel welcome! 

There are four areas, and each has advantages and disadvantages. Area One has the best views and full hookups but there is no bathhouse; Area Two also has full hookups, no view and some of the sites (55-65) are decidedly not level; Area Three is for tents only with no hookups but is close to the bathhouse; Area Four has water and electric hookups, the pads are not paved (as in the others) but most of the sites have more separation than in the other sections. See the photo below to understand the different areas. 

No matter where you camp, there are noise issues. Road noise continued throughout the night and there is a wind turbine on the property. I’ve never been this close to one and yes, there is noise, although the road noise bothered me more. Alcohol is prohibited throughout the campground. There are pay showers available. There are the remains of two bunkers but other than walking by them, you cannot go inside. One (in Area One) is a grassy knoll with stairs to a lookout. 

On the plus side: The bathrooms were clean, there is excellent cell service, Judith Point lighthouse is nearby, it is close to the ferry to Block Island, and there are numerous recreation options available (playground, tennis courts, volleyball net, and basketball courts). Also, the grouchy staffer I read about in reviews was not there the night we arrived and, in fact, the two staffers were very friendly and even recommended a good restaurant in the nearby town.

First to Review
Breathtakingly beautiful lake

This was the second of four huts on Maine Huts and Trails network of trails and it is situated very close to a gorgeous lake. The fall colors were at peak when we were there. I had never heard of Maine Huts and Trails (a small non-profit organization) and likely would not have if we had not traveled with an organized group for a three-day hut to hut experience. Although they are called huts, I would call them lodges. There is a large main area with showers, compostable toilets, a kitchen, and shared dining and living room space. There is a pack-in, pack-out policy. There are no electrical outlets or cell service, so you are off the grid. 

The bunkhouses are shared and each one accommodates up to eight people. 

When it is open and staffed, meals are provided, and the food is good. Dietary needs are taken into account. 

Now for the bad news: One of the four huts (Poplar Stream) has already temporarily closed and all the huts are in jeopardy of not operating during the winter due to a severe financial shortfall. The catch 22 is that they likely do not have money for advertising so very few people know about them. I’m hopeful that by spreading the word on The Dyrt, more people will discover how beautiful they are, become members, donate to them, volunteer, and/or hopefully enjoy time spent in one of the huts.

Beautiful lodging you may not be able to visit!

I had never heard of Maine Huts and Trails (a small non-profit organization) and likely would not have if we had not traveled with an organized group for a three-day hut to hut experience. Poplar Flat is one of four gorgeous huts (and huts do not begin to describe these accommodations– they are more like lodges) on a trail system. The huts were constructed 11 years ago, and Poplar Stream was the first one completed. The main “hut” has showers, radiant heat floors, and compostable toilets. There are no electrical outlets or cell service, so this is an off-grid experience. There is a pack-in, pack-out policy. 

The bunkhouses are shared and each one accommodates up to eight people. When it is open and staffed, meals are provided, and the food is good. Dietary needs are taken into account. 

Now for the bad news: Poplar Flats hut is currently not open to the public (we stayed there as part of a group) and all of the huts are in jeopardy of not operating during the winter due to a severe financial shortfall. The catch 22 is that they likely do not have money for advertising so very few people know about them. I’m hopeful that by spreading the word on The Dyrt, more people will discover how beautiful they are, become a member, donate to them, volunteer, and hopefully enjoy time spent in one of the huts (I believe that the other three are still open).

Great park with great trails!

We loved our two-night stay at this park. It is a very compact park and once you are settled, everything is within walking distance. 76 sites plus 12 cabins in two loops– an “old” one and a “new” one. The old loop has 35 sites (sites 1-12 have electric hookups but, in my opinion, they are not nearly as nice as other sites with no hookups. These 12 sites are very close together (1-6 are more like parallel parking spots) with no privacy between them. Sites 36-72 are in the new loop and can vary significantly. I was told there are future plans for electric hookups in the new loop. If you are camping in the summer, you will want Sites 36, 38, 40, 42, 48, 50, or 76 as these are very shaded and private. The sites on the outside of the grassy area(52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72) were in full sun, which was very nice in September but could be brutal during hot summer months. Some have trees for separation, but these sites are spaced a generous distance apart. The sites on the inside of the loop seem less desirable to me and no one occupied them during our stay. 

Only the bathhouse in the new loop (which was very clean) had showers, which were very nice (clean with a good hard spray and hot water). 

The office was staffed until 6:30 pm and since we pre-registered, the process was very smooth. There is one garbage/recycling area between the two loops and the bonus for us was propane canister recycling. There are a large day-use area and a shelter available to rent, along with two playgrounds (one designated for ages 2-5 and the other for ages 5-12). During the summer months, there is a swimming hole fed by Lower Falls; swimming is only allowed when lifeguards are present. 

What we loved most about our stay here was the hike on the Gorge and Rim Trails. You can make a loop by hiking both. It was a good workout, but the views were incredible on the Gorge Trail. With your camping fee, you can also visit nearby Buttermilk Falls State Park and there is a similar, but shorter, Rim/Gorge Trail which was also worth visiting.

Closest campground to Ausable Chasm

We travel in a 17-foot camper van, but no one ever believes that we are no bigger than a standard cargo van and can easily fit in a regular size parking space. Upon arrival at Ausable Chasm, we were told we had to take a site with water and electric since we had a camper van. These sites were $13 more per night and we really did not need the hookups. We were finally able to convince the staff that we could take a standard tent site, which was more than big enough. 

The road through the campground is dirt and rutted but the speed limit is 5 mph, so it wasn’t that bad, but it would be a mess if it was raining. 

Bathrooms and shower rooms are individual rooms, but the doors are not labeled so it’s a game of “what’s behind door number 1?”  There was no light in the shower room that I looked at so a night shower would be out of the question. The bathrooms were clean and had soap, paper towels, a garbage receptacle, and a mirror in each. 

Lots of ant hills throughout the campground so be cautious where you set up a tent. Each site has a picnic table and a fire ring. Large and nice-looking playground, pool, volleyball net, disc golf and mountain biking/hiking trails. It also looked like there were cross country ski trails but not sure if the campground or cabins would be open in the winter. 

Biggest advantage is that Ausable Chasm(a separate business) is directly across the street from the campground and it is very close to the ferry that will take you to Burlington, VT, our next destination.

Beautiful park but campground not as nice as other NY state parks

Ranger Review: Men’s Rebel Stretch Shell Jacket at Letchworth State Park 

 

CampgroundReview: 

I’ve visited Letchworth State Park, known as the Grand Canyon of the East, in the winter and the summer, but this is the first time in autumn and the first time camping. Although this very large state park is starkly beautiful, the campground is not as nice as other New York state parks we have recently been to. We were in the 600 loop, the farthest from the camp office and closest to the Genesee River (although we could not see it from our site). The sites on the outside of the 600 loop were larger and more private; most of them were pie-shaped and had many trees that provided ample separation. The sites on the inside of the loop were much smaller and less private. The bathrooms were reasonable but dated. The showers did not look very inviting and although I did not use them, I overheard someone comment they were the worst showers they had ever experienced! 

I highly recommend the free tour of the Mt. Morris Dam on the other side of the river from the campground. The tour is interesting and lasts approximately one hour. Offered at 2 pm in the offseason and twice per day during the summer.

It rained almost the entire time we were there, so we didn’t take any long hikes. We did a short hike to the Lower Falls. The footbridge was closed for repairs when we were there. The Middle Falls and Upper Falls can be seen with very short walks. There is also a restaurant in the park which was ok but not fantastic

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Product Review: 

As a Ranger for The Dyrt, I get to test products. At this campground, we tested the Men’s Rebel Stretch Shell Jacket by Red Ledge. The price of this jacket is much less than many other available brands, so we were interested in checking it out and ordered one for my husband. 

Positives: 

  • Affordable price 
  • Workmanship appears to be solid and of good quality. 
  • Seams are all sealed. Feels comfortable, although the material has a slightly rubbery feel 
  • Water beads up very well 
  • The waist is adjustable. 

Negatives: 

  • The hood adjustment is a bit awkward 
  • There are no zippered air vents at the armpits 
  • The front Rapid entry zip pockets are designed to protect your cell phone from rain, but it makes it slightly awkward for slipping your hands in. 
  • Ordered size large because the sleeve length on the XL would have been too long, but this did not leave a lot of room for layering. 

Bottom line: 

Although it is well made and a good value for the price, it is not as functional as my husband would have liked.

Nice and quiet campground in the woods

Once again, we arrived after dark (the days are way too short in the fall)! and although Google Maps guided us correctly to this campground, we also appreciated the very good signage directing us! This campground is set way back in the woods and except for the hooting owl and an occasional barking dog from other campers, it was VERY quiet. No road noise at this campground! 

The campsites are spread out over a big area. Sites 1-9 are located near Berry Pond and are serviced by a pit toilet. The rest are about 1.5 miles south on the loop road. We were originally in site 29 but we would have had to walk through a path in the woods to get to the bathroom; since it was dark when we arrived, we were happy to switch to Site 32, much closer. Our site was level but not all of them appeared to be so. Many trees provide privacy. It looked like the restroom/shower building was fairly new and it was very clean. There is also a group campground and day-use areas.

The next morning, I set off to walk the loop road, thinking it would be a couple of miles at most. Surprise– it was over four miles and HILLY! I got a good workout, but it was a beautiful walk. The reward was seeing Berry Pond and the view when I finally reached the top of the hill. Wish we had more time to take a hike or explore the area more.

Typical but nice National Park campground

Fairly typical national park campground. Two huge loops; sites varied in size; some were clearly for tents only as they had huge boulders that separated the driveway area from the rest of the campsite. Ours was site A46 and was a large pull-through. Easy access to the bathroom which was clean. I thought there were enough trees to separate the sites and provide privacy. Generators are annoying but their allowable hours are limited. Unusual that there were windows in the bathroom, and you could see into the handicapped stall from the windows! No showers, no hookups, no hot water. I did like the“drain” for dishwater– I’ve never seen one like this before. It was located just outside of the bathrooms in the A Loop. The biggest plus to this campground is access to the Cadillac Mountain trail, a challenging but rewarding hike! Also, as a senior, can't beat the price of $15 per night!

So much potential to make this campground wonderful

It made me sad to think what this campground used to be (either that or the website was terribly misleading, however, since the property is for sale, I am thinking that it may have fallen on hard times). 

I called a week ahead to make sure there would be space. Heath, the owner, called back later the same day, very apologetic that it took him so long to return my call (less than a day did not seem to be too long to me). He assured me there was space, so we made our plans. We did not plan on arriving after dark, but we did, having had too much fun admiring the fall color. I called ahead to let Heath know we would be arriving late and left a message (it took three different phone numbers to reach an answering machine). No one was there when we arrived. It was challenging in the dark, but we found two open spaces and backed into one of them. We were not able to use the electrical connection as it required both input and output 30 amp connections and we need a 110 for one of the connections.

I was so tired that, despite the heavy road noise from Route 2, I fell asleep shortly after 9 pm. However, we were woken out of a sound sleep at around 2 am to the sounds of a woman shouting loudly and angrily (at her kids, husband, someone). This went on for a few minutes and no one sounded in distress and then all was quiet again. Even the road noise had subsided. 

The bathrooms were small but reasonable. There was a laundry area and a game room/lounge, stocked with a pool table, couch and chairs, books, (recent) newspapers, and games. There was also an above-ground pool and a separate tent area. Cell service was strong and WiFi is available, but we did not use as we did not have the password. 

RV sites were$35 and tent sites were$25, cash or check only. The next morning, we checked the office again and it was still locked up with no trace of anyone having been or being around. There was no place to leave the money and we never heard back from Heath, so we left. There could be so much potential to this conveniently located campground and I hope that someone is able to revive it.

Centrally located campground in Franconia Notch

As far as the individual sites go, they are fairly standard. Roomy enough with a picnic table and fire ring and most are reasonably spaced far enough apart with trees to provide privacy. However, the noise from Highway 93 is intolerable! 18-wheelers blowing by at all hours of the day and night, making it very difficult to enjoy a restful sleep. I had reserved site 46 because it was across the street from the Pemigewaset River but I could not hear the river over the highway noise. You can hear the highway noise from all the sites, but I think 33, 34, and 35 are the quietest. The Lonesome Lake Trail runs right through the campground which is good news/bad news. Easy access to the trail but there are a number of sites that directly border the trail, which could impede privacy. No cell service. There is a store, and two restrooms with pay showers; one of these also has a dishwashing sink, and washer and dryer, a nice perk. Franconia Notch State Park has a lot to offer and this campground is centrally located. If it wasn’t for the horrible highway noise, I would give this campground 4 stars; however, it is the ONLY campground in the park, so I guess that’s that!

Wish all campgrounds were this nice!

Moe and her husband built this campground after he retired (sadly, he has since passed away so now Moe and her energetic dog, Rusty, run the place). It is located just a few miles down the road from the state park with the same name (I was a bit confused at first, thinking the state park has a campground, which it does not). This is a small, fifteen site campground located on the Bear River, and it is immaculate. It is obvious that Moe takes great pride in her campground with many little touches like flowers and seasonal, yet tasteful decorations. There was only one additional site occupied when we were there, so it was very quiet. Our site (site 7) backed up directly to the river with a path to access it. The restrooms were spotless, as was the shower. There is no additional fee to use the shower and it had plenty of hot water and a great spray. Sites are all level and trees provide sufficient privacy between them. In the middle, there is a grassy area with a table, several Adirondack chairs, and a horseshoe pit. There is potable and non-potable water, and a dump station and an information board with information on nearby hiking trails and weather.

Glorious sunsets and an even more beautiful morning view!

50 sites, full hookup ($40), water& electric ($35) and tent ($??). Has the feel of an RV park with three rows of sites plus some more (I think the tent sites) closer to the road. Not much separation between sites. The lucky ones get beachfront sites with unobstructed views; we were in the second row. The beach was closed for the season when we were there; the campground is open May- September and an on-site caretaker is there the entire five months. Gorgeous sunsets. Coin-operated showers($1 for approximately 15 minutes)– did not use so cannot say how they were. Playground. Clean restroom but the women's only had one operable stall. Although there was a hot water spigot, I was not able to coax any hot(or even warm) water out of it. No defined quiet hours but it was very quiet by 8:30 pm.

The perfect oasis in the woods

When planning this trip, I was perusing The Dyrt (as usual) and came across this place. Previously unreviewed, my curiosity was piqued so I clicked on this glamping site and was directed to Tentrr. I had no knowledge of or experience with Tentrr but was intrigued enough to give this place a try as part of our 34th wedding anniversary celebration, which was two days before our arrival. Like Air BnB, you submit a request for your preferred dates and wait to hear back. It did not take very long for us to be accepted. Pre-payment is required and there is a 72-hour cancellation policy. We arrived around 5:30 pm (check-in is much earlier, I believe noon) and we were met by George and Lucy, our hosts. They were very welcoming, obviously taking great pride in their property and making sure they showed and explained everything to us. The site is VERY private and is accessed via a path through the woods. The canvas tent is set up on a wooden platform and there was a picnic table, all the pots and pans you would need to cook, a dishwashing station, four jugs of well water, paper towels, dish soap, hand sanitizer. Basically, EVERYTHING you could possibly need for your stay, all set up under a huge tarp. There is also a solar shower, a camping loo, and plenty of firewood, including birch bark which burns even when wet, and kindling. We enjoyed a fire at night and again the next morning and there was still wood left over. We were also welcomed with a basket with all the supplies needed to make s'mores. It poured during the night, but we stayed cozy and dry in the canvas tent (and everything under the tarp stayed dry as well).

There was some confusion regarding e-mails sent to us from Tentrr. I’m thinking they are standard boilerplate correspondence, but they told us that bedding and firewood were not provided. This was no problem as we travel with sleeping bags, but it was a nice surprise to find these things were, indeed, provided (I’m guessing these are not standard). 

The season runs from May to mid-October but the best months to visit are July– beginning of October. We were there toward the end of September and the rain notwithstanding, the weather was ideal temperature-wise. You would contend with black flies in May and ticks in June. 

The only two (minor) things to note are that the steps to the platform are steep and you need to be careful to watch your footing and the platform is on a slight downward slope so that our heads were higher than our feet. Staying here was an indulgence but we are so glad we did. We left feeling like we had two new friends in George and Lucy and would highly recommend you give this place a try if you are in eastern New Hampshire!

First to Review
More of an RV park than a campground

Named after the disastrous 1889 Johnstown Flood, this park is at the site of the dam that burst. I need to remember that my definition of a campground is different than what others think of as a campground; this is more of an RV Park. There are ten sites located on a large gravel lot and would definitely not be suitable for tents. There are five sites on either side of the large lot. All have full hook-ups for a very reasonable price ($25 cash or check only). The biggest plus to this campground is the host, Wayne. He immediately greeted us as we arrived and spent time orienting us to the campground and the area, as he is a lifelong resident of the area. He even offered to give us some firewood but when we returned from dinner, it was raining. He showed us that the restrooms were located across the street. Although they were unlocked, when we went to use them at night, we discovered the water had been turned off! It was too late to let Wayne know but he was very surprised to learn this the next morning; he had no idea who had turned the water off. The other downside is the VERY loud coal train which woke us up at just after 5 am. Normally for the restroom issue and loud trains, I would give this two stars but Wayne was very welcoming and apologetic about the restroom issue. This is not our typical type of campground, but we chose it for its proximity to the Johnstown Flood Memorial which is about a mile from the campground. If you are at all interested in the history of Johnstown, this is a must-visit. There is also a museum in the city of Johnstown, about 12 miles away.

Very quiet after the summer!

Ranger Review: Stream2Sea Shampoo & Bodywash and Leave-In Conditioner

Campground Review:

Don’t let the name fool you, the campground is across the street from the lake and there are no lake view sites. We arrived after 6 pm on a Tuesday after Labor Day and found there were only six out of 112 sites occupied. We had the entire Delphia Loop to ourselves. Some loops allow pets and others do not. One loop (the Meshach Browning Loop) has electric hookups; the other loops do not. With so few campers, we were surprised to find the office staffed until 10 pm but this made checking in easier than self-registration. The campground is gated and you need a code to get in; this gave me pause wondering about how safe it was but there were regular ranger patrols and all was quiet. Restrooms in the Delphia loop were modern and very clean. The showers were very nice and rivaled any hotel shower I’ve had. We were told there were regular bear sightings and there were bear boxes at each site; we saw many deer but not a single bear, keeping our zero bear sightings record intact. Each site also had a fire ring, lantern hook (but you would need to be much taller than me to reach it!), and very generous sized picnic table. Alcohol, weapons, and fireworks are prohibited. No/very limited cell service. Sites in the Delphia and George Beckman loops are very quiet but some sites in the other two loops are closer to the road so you will hear road noise. The lake is open Memorial Day through Labor Day so I imagine this campground would yield a very different experience in the height of summer!

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Product Review:

As a Ranger for The Dyrt, I have the awesome opportunity to review products. I'm reviewing two products from Stream2Sea because they are meant to be used together. I am hesitant to use multi-use products as generally, one or the other function is compromised. However, the Shampoo and Body Wash from Stream2Sea  was a nice surprise. Fresh scent and rinsed easily out of my hair, leaving it soft with no residue. Stream2Sea does not have a rinse-out conditioner but it is recommended that you use the leave-in conditioner. When I first used this, my hair felt a little stiff but if I used it very sparingly, this was no longer an issue. By using these two products, I was able to use one product instead of three (soap, shampoo, and rinse out conditioner). But the best thing I liked about these products was how much fuller my hair looked after blow-drying it. I don’t have much hair so anything that makes it look like I have more is a bonus in my book!

Awesome state park with many amenities

Ranger Review: Morsel Spork at West Branch State Park

Campground Review: 

This state park was very welcome after our first two unlucky Ohio state park experiences. We had no trouble pulling in at 3 pm on a Sunday after Labor Day with no reservations and snagging a very nice spot (Site 50 backs up to Kirwan Reservoir). There are two loops that are on Jay Lake where there is a beach; it was understandable that there weren’t any water view spots that had not been reserved here. A very quiet park that is well-maintained with lots of amenities. Even the rumbling of the nearby trains was on the quiet side! Nice playground with toy stocked sandpit, volleyball net, cheap laundry ($3 per load, wash and dry), dishwashing sinks, showers, and clean bathrooms. There was even a step stool for kids to be able to reach the sinks. A staffed store(9am-7pm on Sunday, 11am-7pm Monday– Thursday and 9 am– 8:30 pm on Saturday) with basic supplies and, of course, t-shirts and sweatshirts. Some of the sites have a slight grade so be cautious when selecting. Many trees that provide separation between sites. Several short hiking trails. A side note: I only saw one non-Ohio license plate besides ours in the entire park, almost like it is an Ohio secret (not anymore!)

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Product Review: 

As a Ranger for The Dyrt, I have the opportunity to test products. At this campground, I tested the large  Morsel Spork from Outdoor Element. I have to admit that when I unpacked my box from Outdoor Elements, I was surprised at how LONG our morsel sporks were(we have other sporks that are much shorter so I was expecting these to be a similar size) but then I saw a photo of someone using it with their freeze-dried meal and it was an aha moment! No need to dirty another dish because this mighty spork can reach to the bottom of the pouch with no problem! These sporks are also sturdier than others we have used. The rubber scraper edge is a nice touch – would be great for getting the last delicious bits of meals from the freeze-dried meal pouches and I’m thinking also in glass or plastic containers. A very nice addition to our camping tools.