Kelsey M.
South Strafford , VT
Joined August 2018
Outdoor educator and ethusiast always ready for a new adventure. Currently on a solo road trip around the U.S. www.instagram.com/kels.and.no.one.else/
Amazing Beach Camping (but a little pricey)

There is only one campground in then Assateague park and it's right on the beach. Get ready to get sand everywhere. Be sure to check the forecast before you go because if it gets windy you'll be sure to feel it. I visited in later October and there were very few campers but I imagine the campground fills up in warmer months. The park is small to there are just a few one-way roads leading in and out.

The campground was two loops with drive-in sites as well as walk-in sites that are more removed from the road. There are also cold water showers to help with some of the aforementioned sand.

You'll surely see at least a few ponies on your visit as well as other great wildlife. If you have the time I highly recommend taking the drive over to the Chincoteague side (about an hour) and exploring there. I rented a bike from the Bike Depot and rode it into Chincoteague for a few hours.

Camping on the beach

There is only one campground in then Assateague park and it's right on the beach. Get ready to get sand everywhere. Be sure to check the forecast before you go because if it gets windy you'll be sure to feel it. I visited in later October and there were very few campers but I imagine the campground fills up in warmer months. The park is small to there are just a few one-way roads leading in and out.

The campground was two loops with drive-in sites as well as walk-in sites that are more removed from the road. There are also cold water showers to help with some of the aforementioned sand.

You'll surely see at least a few ponies on your visit as well as other great wildlife. If you have the time I highly recommend taking the drive over to the Chincoteague side (about an hour) and exploring there. I rented a bike from the Bike Depot and rode it into Chincoteague for a few hours.

Great Stop on the Parkway

The Doughton Park campground off of the Blue Ridge Parkway is a great place to spend the night without if you are driving along the Parkway and don't want to venture too far off course. The campground is much larger than I expected. There's an RV section on one side of the Parkway and a tent section that is on the other side. I only explored the tent side.

Although a little bit confusing, with concentric loops, there are many sites to choose from. Some loops and sites are more wooded and further from roads and amenities while others are more central and along a field. I opted for a more central site and ended up being the only person camping in that loop. At the end of October there were only three other campers in the whole tent side of the campground.

The hosts were friendly and helpful in choosing a site. The bathrooms are small but clean and there are easily accessible water sources about. There has been a young bear hanging about in the campground so they, very reasonably, ask that you keep all scent sources in your car.

The Blue Ridge Parkway is an incredible drive, my favorite section is south of this campground in North Carolina. Just along the VA-NC border the Blue Ridge Music Center is well worth the stop. There is free music there daily from 12-4!

Lovely Stop on the Parkway

The Doughton Park campground off of the Blue Ridge Parkway is a great place to spend the night without if you are driving along the Parkway and don't want to venture too far off course. The campground is much larger than I expected. There's an RV section on one side of the Parkway and a tent section that is on the other side. I only explored the tent side.

Although a little bit confusing, with concentric loops, there are many sites to choose from. Some loops and sites are more wooded and further from roads and amenities while others are more central and along a field. I opted for a more central site and ended up being the only person camping in that loop. At the end of October there were only three other campers in the whole tent side of the campground.

The hosts were friendly and helpful in choosing a site. The bathrooms are small but clean and there are easily accessible water sources about. There has been a young bear hanging about in the campground so they, very reasonably, ask that you keep all scent sources in your car.

The Blue Ridge Parkway is an incredible drive, my favorite section is south of this campground in North Carolina. Just along the VA-NC border the Blue Ridge Music Center is well worth the stop. There is free music there daily from 12-4!

Convenient Stop on the Parkway

The Doughton Park campground off of the Blue Ridge Parkway is a great place to spend the night without if you are driving along the Parkway and don't want to venture too far off course. The campground is much larger than I expected. There's an RV section on one side of the Parkway and a tent section that is on the other side. I only explored the tent side.

Although a little bit confusing, with concentric loops, there are many sites to choose from. Some loops and sites are more wooded and further from roads and amenities while others are more central and along a field. I opted for a more central site and ended up being the only person camping in that loop. At the end of October there were only three other campers in the whole tent side of the campground.

The hosts were friendly and helpful in choosing a site. The bathrooms are small but clean and there are easily accessible water sources about. There has been a young bear hanging about in the campground so they, very reasonably, ask that you keep all scent sources in your car.

The Blue Ridge Parkway is an incredible drive, my favorite section is south of this campground in North Carolina. Just along the VA-NC border the Blue Ridge Music Center is well worth the stop. There is free music there daily from 12-4!

Wonderful Stop off the Parkway

This review (just as future reviews to this page should be) is about the Crab Tree Falls Campground that is in North Carolina along the Blue Ridge Parkway and is managed by the National Park Service. There is another Crabtree Falls Campground quite a ways away in Virginia. Google Maps recognizes this campground as Crab Tree Meadows Campground (which is the name of the area along the Parkway that the campground is located in) but the Parkway's Crab Tree Meadows and Crab Tree Falls campgrounds are one and the same. It's all a little confusing.

This is a wonderful stop along the Blue Ridge Parkway. There are few campgrounds that are a park of the Blue Ridge Parkway National Park area. This campground passed by more often than some of the bigger Parkway campgrounds which means that it doesn't fill up as quickly. That doesn't mean that it won't full up. I visited in late October and the campground was pretty darn full by early evening.

This is one of the few national parks where you can collect firewood. However, campers are prohibited from bringing their own wood in, especially from out of state, unless it was been properly treated.

There are picnic tables, fire pits, and running water in the bathrooms. It's a little but funny that many of the campsites share parking with neighboring sites. It was occasionally challenging to tell which parking went with which site. Many of the sites are a little removed from their parking spot which help create separation between the sites.

Loop A is for RVs while Loop B is for tents (Loop C was closed when I visited)

The campground hosts were very friendly. If you have time take the short but very steep hike down to the actual falls.

Wonderful Stop off the Parkway

This review (just as future reviews to this page should be) is about the Crab Tree Falls Campground that is in North Carolina along the Blue Ridge Parkway and is managed by the National Park Service. There is another Crabtree Falls Campground quite a ways away in Virginia. Google maps recognizes this campground as Crab Tree Meadows Campground (which is the name of the area along the Parkway that the campground is located in). It's all a little confusing.

This is a wonderful stop along the Blue Ridge Parkway. There are few campgrounds that are a park of the Blue Ridge Parkway National Park area. This campground passed by more often than some of the bigger Parkway campgrounds which means that it doesn't fill up as quickly. That doesn't mean that it won't full up. I visited in late October and the campground was pretty darn full by early evening.

This is one of the few national parks where you can collect firewood. However, campers are prohibited from bringing their own wood in, especially from out of state, unless it was been properly treated.

There are picnic tables, fire pits, and running water in the bathrooms. It's a little but funny that many of the campsites share parking with neighboring sites. It was occasionally challenging to tell which parking went with which site. Many of the sites are a little removed from their parking spot which help create separation between the sites.

Loop A is for RVs while Loop B is for tents (Loop C was closed when I visited)

The campground hosts were very friendly. If you have time take the short but very steep hike down to the actual falls.

Friendly Campground

I was just passing through when I stayed at Cosby Campground and I wish I could have stayed for longer. The nature in the surrounding area is incredible and the other campers were very friendly. It's a fairly large campground with multiple loops, some reservable, some not, some for tent campers, some for RVs.

The hosts were very helpful in finding a good spot. The bathrooms have flush toilets and sinks but no showers and were kept in good condition. The sites are far enough a part that you don't feel crammed in. A lot of the tent sites had stairs/trails up or down a small so that the site itself was set off the road.

This is one of the first National Parks I've visited in a while that allows wood collection. You are not allowed to bring in your own campfire wood unless it was purchased locally and have been treated to appropriate standards. It was a little rainy and chilly in later October but the sites still were more or less filled by early evening.

Fine- Could Get Crowded in Summer

I stopped at Highway 9 Landing while driving from Taos, NM to Nashville, TN. Just a little ways off the highway it was a nice place to spend the night right on Oklahoma's biggest lake (at least the biggest that's entirely within the state of OK). Midweek in mid-October the campground was all but deserted. The only sounds I could hear were the roadway across the lake, birds, and lapping water.

In the off season the bathrooms were sort of clean-ish. Sites have picnic tables and grills and some have good flat spots for tents but I got the feeling that it was a campground more geared to RV and van camping.

There's a marina on one side of the campground and I can imagine that in the summer there's lots of activity on the lake making this a very lively campground. It was a fine campground just not my cup of tea. (Also the sunset was incredible)

Lovely

Gallo Campground is the only campground in Chaco Canyon National Park so reserving ahead of time or getting there earlier in the day depending on the season are very important. The park is very remote so it's a long drive on a potentially very rough road to get in but once you're there the route is well worth the visit.

I visited on a Wednesday night in mid October. The campground had filled up by about 2pm Wednesday and but was full by about 11am on Thursday.

There is currently no potable water at the campground but water is available at the Visitors Center a short drive down the road. There are however flushing toilets and running water in the bathrooms. The campsites each have a picnic table and fire pit. I thought the set up of the tent only area was interesting. There is a parking lot area with sites surrounding it on three sides. The set up allows for privacy between the sites which are nestled in among the rocks and plants as well as ruins!

I wish I had spent more time in Chaco Canyon exploring the sites, hiking, and going on tours. The daily tours and ranger talks provide more insight into the canyon's history than you can get with the self guided booklets.

Pretty Nice, No Water

The Gallo Campground is the only campground in Chaco Canyon National Park so reserving ahead of time or getting there earlier in the day depending on the season are very important. The park is very remote so it's a long drive on a potentially very rough road to get in but once you're there the route is well worth the visit.

I visited on a Wednesday night in mid October. The campground had filled up by about 2pm Wednesday and but was full by about 11am on Thursday.

There is currently no potable water at the campground but water is available at the Visitors Center a short drive down the road. There are however flushing toilets and running water in the bathrooms. The campsites each have a picnic table and fire pit. I thought the set up of the tent only area was interesting. There is a parking lot area with sites surrounding it on three sides. The set up allows for privacy between the sites which are nestled in among the rocks and plants.

I wish I had spent more time in Chaco Canyon exploring the sites, hiking, and going on tours. The daily tours and ranger talks provide more insight into the canyon's history than you can get with the self guided booklets.

Pretty Great

Let me start this by saying that I am incredibly skeptical of chain campgrounds (for some reason especially KOA's). The KOA Holiday in Durango is great. I was there only a few days before closing for the season and it has snowed in much of the surrounding area so the campground wasn't too crowded. The campground is a little ways outside of historic Durango and less than an hour from Mesa Verde. The tent site I stayed in was near the showers/bathroom and laundry and in the middle of the ground but didn't feel like I was lacking privacy. The cost is basically the same as staying in Mesa Verde's campground and there's paid laundry as well as really great showers in very clean bathrooms. The staff are incredibly friendly. They have gardens on site and, because it was the very end of the season, they were giving away fresh produce for free!

Not Bad

The only campground in Mesa Verde National Park, this is the most expensive National Park campground I have stayed in. Morefield is also the only National Park campground I've visited that had wifi, free showers, and paid laundry. There were very few other campers in the tent loops mid-October. The bathrooms are kind of mostly clean. There is also water and trash throughout the campground. Most of the attractions in Mesa Verde are a little less than an hour's drive away. I wish I could have stayed longer if only to go on more of the tours of historic sites.

Not Bad

The only campground in Mesa Verde National Park, this is the most expensive National Park campground I have stayed in. Morefield is also the only National Park campground I've visited that had wifi, free showers, and paid laundry. There were very few other campers in the tent loops mid-October. The bathrooms are mostly kind of clean. There is also water and trash throughout the campground. Most of the attractions in Mesa Verde are a little less than an hour's drive away. I wish I could have stayed longer if only to go on more of the tours of historic sites.

First to Review
Not Bad

The only campground in Mesa Verde National Park, this is the most expensive National Park campground I have stayed in. Morefield is also the only National Park campground I've visited that had wifi, free showers, and paid laundry. There were very few other campers in the tent loops mid-October. The bathrooms are mostly kinda clean. There is also water and trash throughout the campground. Most of the attractions in Mesa Verde are a little less than an hour's drive away. I wish I could have stayed longer if only to go on more of the tours of historic sites.

Chilly, Beautiful, Empty in Early October

The campground was more or less deserted when I was there. It was also very cold and windy but incredibly beautiful. With easy access to area attractions, I chose to stay here because there is was just off my route between Grand Junction and Denver. There are several areas that are specifically for tents although it didn't look as if all of the tent sites had great spots to actually pitch a tent. It's also a deceptively large campground and I drove around for quite a while before finding a good site.

Tent camping? Not even close to worth it.

I paid more than two times a National Park or state park campground for the world’s tiniest site in the middle of what is essentially a parking lot with trees and a few tables…

Slickrock Campground should only be a last resort for tent campers as it was for me. I chose to camp here exclusively for the showers which had insanely variable water temperature. The bathrooms are in need of repair (moldy sinks and such) but were overall clean.

The only redeeming factor was going to be the hot tub. Doesn’t soaking in a hot tub after a day of hiking sounds great? Even if the pools are right on the main road. When I checked in I specifically asked if the hot tub was open, the woman at the desk looked me in the eye and said, “yeah the pool is open 10-10.” Which was true enough, the pool was open but BOTH hot tubs were closed…

They currently have a deal that it’s only $20 for a single tent site as a walk-in camper. If reserve ahead of time it’s considerably more. This encourages people not to make reservations and is thus a bad business move.

Perhaps if you have an RV this is a nice place to spend an evening or two, it’s conveniently located near the town of Moab and the nearby national parks.

Gorgeous Location, Out of the Way

A great alternative when the Island in the Sky Campground at Canyonlands is full (or if you're just looking for something else up on the mesa), Horsethief Campground is a relatively well developed BLM campground. There are pit toilets, established tent pads, fire pits, and picnic tables at each site. I camped the first week of October and arrived after 5pm yet there were still several sites to choose from. The campground filled up as the evening went on.

Note that at certain times of the year there is NO WATER anywhere up by the Island in the Sky section of Canyonlands, at Dead Horse State Park, or elsewhere. Make sure you have enough water before you begin your ascent.

Horsethief Campground is a few miles away from the Canyonlands entrance and thus it's easy to get between the two in a matter of minutes. There are also mountain bike trails and hiking trails that leave from Horsethief campground. The views are incredible no matter which trail you take. 

I got up early in the morning to drive into Canyonlands to see the sunrise at Mesa Arch. It was beautiful and very much worth the early morning but it was also very crowded with other people to watch the sunrise.

Just Wonderful!

Sunset is the more secluded of Bryce Canyon's two campgrounds. I LOVE that there are separate RV and tent loops and that generators are not allowed in the tent loops. 

I ended up in B loop which is the smallest. Each site is well defined and separated by some vegetation, but not enough to provide privacy. 

The campground host was nice and took her job very seriously. She was happy to ask RVers to leave the tent sites as needed. During the day I could hear but not see the road. The free shuttle system helps minimize traffic in the park. It's an easy walk from the campground so some amazing viewpoints and there's a shuttle stop right at the campground entrance if you want to check out some further sites. The shuttle system was a little confusing when I visited because they had just switched to winter hours that day and were still figuring out the timing and system. 

Each site has a table and fire pit with a bathroom nearby. The bathrooms also have well maintained rooms to wash dishes in, something I haven't seen before. 

Bryce Canyon is incredible! If you're looking for an easy but breathtaking hike I suggest doing some of the Rim Trail. If you do this hike while the shuttles are running it doesn't have to be an out and back, you can just choose two shuttle stops to hike between.

Great Location for Visiting Zion

The South Campground in Zion is less popular than the Watchman Campground. There seemed to be less RV's in South, which for me is always a plus. I visited at the very beginning of October and if was still very warm, the temperature never seemed to drop at night. All I needed to sleep was a blanket, and not even my sleeping bag.

Upon arrival, the campground hosts chose a spot for me based on the current availability. The challenge with camping in the park is that as soon as spots are empty they are taken so there is a constant turn over and you just take what you can get. 

The sites themselves are not all the private but a conveniently located to bathrooms, water, and trash. Unfortunately I was placed right behind one of the bathrooms and the sites are such that people were walking through on their way to and from the bathrooms. 

There is a river that runs along one side of the campground and if you're really lucky, you may get one of those sites. There are a few spots where you can access the river to relax or for a quick dip. 

The Pa'rus trail runs through the campground which makes is easy to get to the Visitors Center and shuttle stop (roughly a 5 minute walk). The town of Springdale is not far away and easy to get to through the southern pedestrian entrance.

If you're looking for a hike and want to forego the shuttle lines and/or the crowds of Angles Landing (or maybe it just isn't your thing) I suggest the Watchman Trail that leaves from the Visitors Center.