What do you eat when car camping?

I’m thinking about going car camping and would like to eat out as little as possible. What do you guys recommend to eat and bring, considering the small amount of storage and limited resources to actually cook the food. I do plan on bringing a very small generator and small microwave.

I have a two burner coleman camp stove and that’s all I use to cook.

I kind of just rotate between.

  1. fried rice
  2. burritos
  3. pasta

I’m a simple man haha. I don’t eat meat so that keeps things simple for me. If you’ve got a microwave you can pretty much cook anything you’d like :slight_smile:

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If I had a camping microwave I would be eating mug scrambled eggs all the time. Crack two eggs in a porcelain mug, swish with a fork, microwave for 40 seconds, swish with a fork, microwave for 20 more seconds, at this point it is probably done (xl eggs may require 10 more seconds). Add cheese. Mmm. As long as you don’t overlook it (I never have, I eat this for lunch every day basically) the taste and texture is great.

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@Clark With a microwave, you have so many options! One thing we do (on our camping stove but ideally made for microwaves) are meals in a pouch. Like Taylor, I am a vegetarian (but husband is not!) so the Tasty Bite Indian food is a good staple. Another one I have tried and liked are Vana plant-based meals (in a pouch). We used to do burritos but once you open the pack of tortillas, you have to store them in a fridge or cooler so we switched to nachos. We make them in 8" cast iron pans so we each customize them the way we want them. Another option is Barilla makes cooked pasta (for two or one hungry person). You heat in the microwave or on a stovetop - ready in less than five minutes. Hope some of these ideas work for you!

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We eat basically what we eat at home.
Quinoa with veggies for dinner and protein of choice. Left over quinoa is used for breakfast burritos.
Rice with curry cubes, (just add water) and grilled veggies is easy and not much clean up. S&B is the brand we use.
Lunch is usually sandwiches/PBJ.
Boxed Mac/cheese is easy and quick. Add veggie hotdogs or regular hotdogs. Easy meal.
We don’t do pancakes or French toast. Too much to clean up. Syrup attracts bugs.
We have a 2 burner Coleman propane stove so, 2 pan meals are ideal.

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We eat a lot of the same stuff we eat at home, and I either cook on the fire or over my backpacking stove and a pot support for large pots that a friend welded for us. I think the key to making it easy is prepping beforehand. I throw together “meal kits” of individually prepped &bagged ingredients in a gallon sized ziplock bag. I’ll put soy curls (a vegan chickn substitute), fajita seasoning, a lime, a small chunk of coconut oil, sliced peppers and onions, tortillas, each in a small bag added to a big one. It makes cooking super easy and we do reuse the bags for dry ingredients. Cold stuff gets stored in the cooler. I like to check out dirtygourmet.com for meal ideas. If you are going to cook over the fire, don’t forget pot holders!

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I go for one pot/pan meals. Pan: my favorite is slice Fieldroast Italian sausage in half and fry with veggies to eat in a wrap (cook double and have for 2 meals). Pot: knorr side dishes with spinach and tofu jerky; chili beans (right out of the can or heat with extras); oatmeal. No pot/pan: salsa, chips, cheese and lunchmeat plate; spinach salad.
I usually bring some backpacking meals as a backup if I get stuck or run out (or find someone in need - which has happened a few times). Lunch is usually a variety of bars (currently on a Taos maple and pecan bar binge) and nuts. I bring Liquid IV or other electrolyte powder in easy to use packets.
Being in a car means you can stock up locally on longer trips. I go with the local goods and get adventurous in my combinations :slight_smile:

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